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carmendrahl Tabs and Marriage (300 comments)

7 tabs open, but it's early in the day. The Dude (aka significant other) never uses tabs- always opens a new window. I'm a tab girl. We are learning to agree to disagree :)

about a year ago

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Tackling Athletes' Brain Trauma Before It Kills

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a month and a half ago

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "In 2007, pro wrestler Chris (The Canadian Crippler) Benoit killed his son, his wife, and himself. Benoit's autopsy showed he had chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive, brain-damaging disorder. He's far from the only athlete to be affected. The signatures of the disease have shown up in autopsies of ice hockey players, boxers, and NFL retirees. Researchers want to detect brain trauma while athletes are still alive. They're zeroing in on features like aggregates of the protein tau. Among the diagnostic hopefuls are positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; diffusion tensor imaging, which is a type of MRI; and cerebrospinal fluid sampling."
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Botched Executions Put Lethal Injections Under New Scrutiny

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about 3 months ago

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "Lethal injections are typically regarded as far more humane methods for execution compared to predecessors such as hanging and firing squads.

But the truth about the procedure's humane-ness is unclear. Major medical associations have declared involvement of their member physicians in executions to be unethical, so that means that relatively inexperienced people administer the injections. Mounting supply challenges for the lethal drug cocktails involved are forcing execution teams to change procedures on the fly. This and other problems have contributed to recent crises in Oklahoma and Missouri.

As a new story and interactive graphic explains, states are turning to a number of compound cocktails to get around the supply problems."

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This is what it's like inside a generic drugmaker in India

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about 7 months ago

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "India produces a significant chunk of the generic medications used worldwide. Yet the country has had some problems as of late – product recalls, bans, and fines to companies with plant problems. The country is also under pressure to make its patent system more Western. Cipla is one of India's largest generic drugmakers. It rarely lets cameras inside its manufacturing facility outside Mumbai. Here is a rare look inside the plant and a very basic explainer of current Good Manufacturing Practices, the FDA standard plants such as Cipla's must follow."
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Chefs Preview Edible Prototypes of Surface Tension-based Cocktail Garnishes

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about 8 months ago

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "Last fall, MIT researchers made news for developing two bioinspired cocktail toppers-- a moving cocktail boat and a floral pipette-- in collaboration with James Beard Award-winning chef José Andrés. Both the boat and floral pipette operate by taking advantage of surface tension-- either to propel the boat forward or to keep small drops of liquid inside the flower's petals. Some of those early garnishes were nominally edible. But to make them worthy of a restaurant debut requires balancing of flavors, temperature, density, and alcohol content, among other factors. A story and video go inside Andrés' company ThinkFoodGroup to see how the project is coming along. The toppers aren't available to the public just yet."
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How Heroin Addicts Helped Scientists Link Pesticides and Parkinson's

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about 9 months ago

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "Exposure to certain pesticides, including rotenone and paraquat, has been associated with a higher incidence of Parkinson's disease in population studies. But how did scientists come to think of a link between Parkinson's disease and pesticides in the first place? The answer involves the 1980s drug underworld, where criminals were synthesizing modified versions of illegal drugs such as heroin to stay one step ahead of the law. One molecule in some designer heroin cocktails, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), breaks down in the human body into 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), a nerve cell killer. Heroin addicts exposed to this molecule got Parkinson's-like symptoms. As for the connection to pesticides, MPP+ is a weed killer that was used in the 70s. It also closely resembles the structure of the pesticide paraquat. The saga, therefore, put scientists on high alert to the possibility that pesticides might play a role in developing Parkinson's."
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New tests don't prove "Into the Wild"'s Chris McCandless died from poison

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about 10 months ago

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "In 1992, 24-year-old Christopher McCandless died alone in the Alaska wilderness. His tale was immortalized in the book "Into the Wild". Last month in a New Yorker blog post, author Jon Krakauer cited a new chemical analysis supporting the idea that McCandless ate wild potato seeds that contain a neurotoxic amino acid called beta-ODAP. But the new data doesn't support his claim, chemists say. Krakauer contracted a lab that used HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography), a technique that has been used previously to separate a seed extract into the individual amino acids and other components that make it up. However, the data show that the potato seed extract was barely separated at all, so it's impossible to tell what the seeds contain. Chemists say the current data is not conclusive in any way, but that the beta-ODAP theory is worth follow-up tests, including a better HPLC separation with mass spectrometry."
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Why Are Cells The Size They Are? Gravity May Be A Factor

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year ago

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "Eukaryotic cells, which are defined by having a nucleus, rarely grow larger than 10 m in diameter. Scientists know a few reasons why this is so. A new study suggests another reason--gravity. Studying egg cells from the frog Xenopus laevis, which reach as big as 1 mm across and are common research tools, Princeton researchers Marina Feric and Clifford Brangwynne noticed that the insides of the eggs' nuclei settled to the bottom when they disabled a mesh made from the cytoskeleton protein actin. They think the frog eggs evolved the mesh to counteract gravity, which according to their calculations becomes significant if cells get bigger than 10 m in diameter."
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Galileo: right on the solar system, wrong on ice?

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  1 year,7 days

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "Famed astronomer Galileo Galilei is best known for taking on the Catholic Church by championing the idea that the Earth moves around the sun. But he also engaged in a debate with a philosopher about why ice floats on water. While his primary arguments were correct, he went too far, belittling legitimate, contradictory evidence given by his opponent, Ludovico delle Colombe. Galileo's erroneous arguments during the water debate are a useful reminder that the path to scientific enlightenment is not often direct and that even our intellectual heroes can sometimes be wrong."
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Looking beyond corn and sugarcane for cost-effective biofuels

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  1 year,21 days

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "The abundance of shale gas in the U.S. is expected to lower the cost of petrochemicals for fuel and other applications. That's making it harder for plant-based, renewable feedstocks to compete in terms of price. In the search for cost-competitive crops, companies are testing plants other than traditional biofuel sources such as corn and sugarcane. In a video, watch how the firm Canergy is test-growing a relative of sugarcane called energy cane, which is expected to yield 5 times the ethanol per acre compared to corn."
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AIDS activists' legacy lives on in hunt for rare disease treatments.

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year ago

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "People affected by exceedingly rare diseases are taking a page from the AIDS epidemic- they’re lobbying Congress and taking matters into their own hands to find cures. Because rare diseases afflict so few people (sometimes a dozen or less), thousands of diseases have been ignored for decades. Now, a shift in big pharmaceutical companies’ business models away from multi-billion-dollar blockbuster drugs is coinciding with a deeper understanding of the genetic underpinnings of rare diseases. And government policies introduced just last year have created new incentives to serve small patient populations. The collision of factors-patient advocates, science, and government incentives- has made rare disease drugs one of the fastest-growing areas of drug development."
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Study "extends 3-D printing to a new class of materials".

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year ago

carmendrahl (2593679) writes "3-D printers don’t build only solid objects anymore. They also build liquid objects, thanks to a research team at the University of Oxford. The group custom crafted a 3D printer to squirt tiny liquid droplets from its nozzles. The 3-D patterned droplets can mimic biological tissues, such as nerve fibers, and may have potential in tissue engineering applications. An expert not involved with the study is cautious about endorsing the tissue engineering applications because they're not yet demonstrated, but praises the team for extending 3-D printing to new classes of materials."
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Keeping science up with the massive supplement market

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year and a half ago

carmendrahl writes "Consumers who see “natural” products as safer than pharmaceuticals drove herbal and botanical supplement sales to $5.3 billion in 2011, up $1 billion in a decade. But botanicals are usually complex blends, which presents different challenges than pharmaceuticals. Some suppliers are now carefully controlling plant growth to ensure a consistent product and consistent study results. (Soil, light, pesticide use all can matter). Others are honing analysis techniques to better understand blends and ferret out intentionally doctored batches."
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Red wine compound reported to target anti-aging pathway, after all

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year and a half ago

carmendrahl writes "The red-wine molecule resveratrol's link to an anti-aging biochemical pathway has been in dispute for some time. Now, a new study by researchers at multiple institutions is supporting that link. The team concludes resveratrol does indeed activate sirtuin enzymes, which regulate a host of anti-diabetes and anti-aging disease genes. They add that making resveratrol-like molecules that act on this pathway is a viable strategy for developing drugs for inflammation, diabetes, and other diseases. However, some of the study's authors have a significant financial stake in developing resveratrol-like drugs. And scientists have mixed opinions about the study's conclusions."
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How million-dollar frauds turned photo conservation into a mature science

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year and a half ago

carmendrahl writes "Photos used to be second-class citizens in the art world, not considered as prestigious as paintings or sculpture. But that changed in the 1990s. As daguerrotypes and the like started selling for millions of dollars, fakes also slipped in. Unfortunately, the art world didn't have good ways of authenticating originals.
Cultural heritage researchers had to play catch-up, and quickly. Two fraud cases, one involving avant garde photographer Man Ray, turned photo conservation from a niche field into a mature science. And today eBay plays an important role in helping ferret out the frauds."

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Here's how the sequester's set to kick in at each federal research agency

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year and a half ago

carmendrahl writes "Unless Congress and the White House act before March 1, the automatic across-the-board spending cuts known as the sequester will kick in. And federal agencies are bracing for the fiscal impact. Federal agencies and the White House are releasing details about how these cuts will affect their operations. If the cuts take effect, expect fewer inspections to the food supply, cuts to programs that support cleanups at former nuclear plants, and plenty of researcher layoffs, among other things."
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Here's why it's so hard to predict how caffeine will affect your body

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year and a half ago

carmendrahl writes "Emergency-room visits linked to caffeine-laden energy drinks are on the rise. This gives scientists who'd like to see caffeine regulated the jitters. But the US Food and Drug Administration seems to be dragging its feet on regulating caffeine content in food and drink, because people have different sensitivities to it. Currently, caffeine-rich products like Monster Energy get around the rules because they're marketed as dietary supplements."
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Surprise-Small Doses Help Weed Out Dud Drug Candidates

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year and a half ago

carmendrahl writes "Tiny drug doses- 1% of an active dose- are unexpectedly useful in clinical trials. But don't bust out your homeopathic pills. This concept--microdosing-- is a different concept entirely. Studies with microdoses get conducted side-by-side with standard clinical trials to figure out what fraction of the full-size dose actually makes it to the site of action. Scientists at Merck used the technique with five potential new HIV drugs. Possible future applications include determining whether a patient's cancer is likely to respond to certain platinum-based drugs."
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One-of-a-kind chemistry autograph collection goes digital

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year and a half ago

carmendrahl writes "A science historian has collaborated with a publisher to digitize a one-of-a kind collection of chemists' signatures. In the shadow of World War II, a Japanese chemist named Tetsuo Nozoe traveled outside his land for the first time, and collected autographs from the people he met on the way. This turned into a forty year hobby, and a 1200-page collection. The digital collection sucks chemists in for hours- it's full of cartoons, jokes, haikus, and scribbles the signers admit to having scrawled "in a drunken state". Nobel Prizewinners and ordinary chemists signed side-by-side. The Nozoe notebook collection will be open access for at least three years, with a big goal being to identify all the "mystery" signatures in the collection with help from readers."
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How The Solar Impulse Plane Inspires Green Thinking

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year and a half ago

carmendrahl writes "Slashdotters have read quite a bit about Solar Impulse-- the first solar-powered airplane that can fly both day and night-- including news of its first intercontinental flight in 2012. The project has brought more attention to solar power as a fuel source. Now, two chemical companies are opening up about how their involvement in the project is making them think leaner and greener. An accompanying video shows Solar Impulse in flight and discusses the materials-- like carbon nanotubes-- that make it possible."
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Check Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself-with a bad trip

carmendrahl carmendrahl writes  |  about a year and a half ago

carmendrahl writes "In Austria, people can submit their street drugs to a lab-on-a-bus to ensure they got what they paid for. The government is using the bus to track emergence of new variants of bath salts and other drugs. Now, researchers have developed a test they'd like to add to the bus's offerings: it assesses drug action instead of just reporting chemical structure.
Note- this is a resubmit that fixes the broken link here."

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