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In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

caseih Re:Flawed, 'cos... (453 comments)

What you say has a ring of truth to it, but from what I've read in the car magazines auto ownership is certainly stagnant, and the growth saw in the past is gone, and car companies seem to not know what to do to get demand back. They've tried the idea of a car being a lifestyle, and that didn't seem to do much especially. Now they are trying to go the entertainment route, putting everything and the kitchen sink into the center console. I highly doubt that's going to do much. Basically car makers are victims of their own success. They've saturated the market, cars are quite reliable now with minimal maintenance, and they are perceived as commodity items (albeit expensive ones). I think your arguments are likely to hold for some time yet, but the article's arguments are likely to hold more sway in the long term. The number of teenagers getting a drivinglicense is steadily declining from 30 years ago. Now arguably one huge factor in this is that they depend on others to drive them (parents or friends), but as they become adults they are likely to take their car apathy with them into the next generation. To them cars are just tools. They aren't lifestyle items anymore or fashion accessories. Just tools. When these kids who aren't car crazy begin to vote they might start voting for better public transportation, autonomous cars, etc.

4 days ago
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Corning Reveals Gorilla Glass 4, Promises No More Broken IPhones

caseih This just an iphone issue or Android phones too? (201 comments)

I have an old T-mobile Galaxy II (989) that supposedly has gorilla glass on the screen. I've dropped it numerous times and it's never once broken or shattered, and it's now an ancient phone by internet standards. Yet I've seen countless iphones with broken glass. Perhaps the more flimsy, plasticy Android phones actually have an advantage here by flexing instead of shattering? Or is there some other reason this is an Apple problem?

4 days ago
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Swedish Court Refuses To Revoke Julian Assange's Arrest Warrant

caseih Re:the NERVE of them swedes! (243 comments)

Even if you're trying to be funny, a falsehood is still a falsehood. So kindly please stop saying things that we know are untrue. Assange has neither been charged with nor convicted of rape. He is innocent until proven guilty, no matter what we know about his actions and lifestyle.

The swedes want him for questioning in regards to two (if I recall correctly) alleged rapes. However it's unlikely that if he did return to Sweden that they would even be able to charge him let alone convict him of rape. But getting him in Swedish custody paves the way for extradition to the United States where the current government wishes to punish him severely for exposing their sins. There's near certainty that's why the Swedes have pursued him thus. And that's why he's fighting this extradition tooth and nail.

It's kind of like how the mob bosses in 1930s Chicago were brought down. They never could make actual charges of murder stick, so they got him on tax evasion. Means to an end for the US government.

about a week ago
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Microsoft Releases Out-of-Band Security Patch For Windows

caseih Re:"Out of band?" (178 comments)

Yes I agree. I was wondering if Microsoft was going to be shipping the patch to customers on tapes, or what.

about two weeks ago
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Real Steampunk Computer Brought Back To Life

caseih Mechanical computers are awesome (81 comments)

Wow, that was an amazing set of videos. Particularly how the machine can do decomposition. What a brilliant man who designed this machine.

All analog computers fascinate me. Apparently analog computers implemented fire control on navy ships for many years, compensating for the speed, direction, and roll of the ship in order to aim guns. The accuracy of such a system was impressive, and they were used up until the 1980s on some older ships. Digital systems simply couldn't get the accuracy for many years.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

Slide rules are very cool as well. I want to learn how to use one.

about two weeks ago
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How 4H Is Helping Big Ag Take Over Africa

caseih Re:Hybrid vigor FTW? (377 comments)

Well said. There's a lot of disinformation being spread by well-meaning individuals, and by some not-so-well meaning individuals. Especially rubbish like "hybrid seeds are bred... [to] typically need chemicals to thrive." Except that it's strictly true; they do need chemicals like water, CO2, Nitrates to survive. But to say they *need* pesticides suggests that the pesticides are directly causing growth and contributing to the plant, with the innuendo that our food is laced (purposely even) with toxic chemicals, is dishonest.

There are lots of issues at play here with sustaining food production for the future, but articles like this one don't bring anything to the table.

about two weeks ago
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Multi-Process Comes To Firefox Nightly, 64-bit Firefox For Windows 'Soon'

caseih Re:Tempting (181 comments)

Except that on windows you get the 32 bit baggage whether you want or need it. It's not like Linux where you can install a 64 bit pure distro. So in the Windows world, moving to 64 bits just for the sake of 64 bits doesn't make as much sense. It doesn't save much.

about two weeks ago
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Drones Could 3D-Map Scores of Hectares of Land In Just a Few Hours

caseih Farm topography (94 comments)

Depending on the accuracy obtained, such mapping would be highly useful on our farm for figuring out drainage. Some areas of a field might drain better with only a very small slope, if we knew where to put the channel. Currently the only real option is to drive over the field with an RTK GPS receiver and make a GIS map of elevations. Which works well enough (depending on the grid resolution; can get really old driving every 10 feet over 160 acres), but takes quite a long time to do.

about a month ago
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Dangerous Vulnerability Fixed In Wget

caseih Re:super user (58 comments)

Yes that's good practice for any command. Though wget is used behind the scenes by, say, opkg on openwrt boxes, which has to run as root since it's unpacking and installing packages. In fact on embedded devices, most everything runs as root there, typically, even if it's a bad idea, and is going to have to change as the internet of things becomes a fact of life. Never thought I'd need to run selinux on an embedded device, but we're to the point now where that's required.

It's good to have this particular bug fixed at least.

about a month ago
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Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

caseih Re:How about we hackers? (863 comments)

Init scripts work just fine in systemd, and will for as long as there are init scripts. So vendors and apps *can* provide systemd service definition files, but they don't have to. It's backwards compatible just like upstart was in RHEL6. So no there's not a loooooooooong drawn out process to make it work. I'm running a debian box right now with systemd and everything is still in init scripts.

about a month ago
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Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

caseih Re:How about we hackers? (863 comments)

I can tell you haven't used systemd then. It doesn't use a registry at all. And services run in the same manner as they do with the init that you're used to. Talk about FUD.

about a month ago
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Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

caseih Re:It's about control (863 comments)

Good thing systemd works better than my own editing skills. That should be something along the lines of "[because of your question] it's readily apparent you have no clue about systemd."

about 1 month ago
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Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

caseih Re:It's about control (863 comments)

Today, the competent administrator can control startup, dependencies, etc on a granular basis. With systemd, that control has gone - somewhere else.

How so? Systemd has removed my ability to start and stop services?

How would a package mess with systemd's configuration? It's readily apparently no clue about systemd. Hint, it's no different than it was before. A package drops its own service definition file in a directory (sound familiar?). That's it. It's no different in this area than any other init system. If the file is bad, the service just won't start. Just as it was before. Runlevels or targets are defined the same way: with simple symlinks. Really in this aspect, systemd is no different than upstart or plain old system v init.

This post is one example why the debate gets so heated. People like you post stuff that's only nearly half true, without knowing anything about systemd, except the name of one of the authors. FUD plain and simple. A technical debate is fine, but you've got to actually know what you're talking about before you start debating. So far I've seen zero technical debate on this site regarding systemd. Certainly no one is willing to own up to the flaws in traditional init that have led to systemd's development. It's extremely disheartening to see this kind of irrational fear instead of technical discussion.

about 1 month ago
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Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

caseih Re:How about we hackers? (863 comments)

What Red Hat does is between them and their customers, plain and simple. People can complain about freedom of choice all they want (hint, you still have it), and you, as an experienced admin, are free to plot your own course.

I don't believe Red Hat has made this move on RHEL 7 in error. I think they have a pretty good handle on their customers and their needs. From what I can see on the RHEL lists that have many professional admins, there's been no hue and cry, no sky falling, etc.

I'm not quite sure what a "veteran administrator" is that the article speaks of, but I managed a fair number of servers professionally for quite a few years and I have no problem with systemd. It works stably and well (and no a reboot is not required for most updates as the daemons can be restarted on the fly if necessary). As I've said on many occasions, I've had race conditions completely stop boot scripts in their tracks before (pre-upstart RHEL). Any talk of a binary log is a red herring, plain and simple. Running CentOS 7 right now and syslog is still there, logging away to a normal log file. If one wishes to use it, there is journald to pour through when you need greater granularity and detail in debugging a problem. That has the potential to be of tremendous value for system administrators when tracking down obscure bugs and problems. The traditional syslog is still there to satisfy the record-keeping needs of many organizations, possibly under law in some cases.

As for the unix philosophy, init systems pre-systemd hardly did just one thing and hardly did it well.

How does systemd remind you of windows? Have you actually *used* either in a system administration capacity?

about 1 month ago
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Researcher Finds Tor Exit Node Adding Malware To Downloads

caseih Re:So if TOR nodes can easily do it (126 comments)

What does SSL have to do with it? As you say yourself, as long as you are checking the signing key on each package, you can guarantee that the package is intact and genuine, not matter what the MITM tries to do. The worst that happens with http is that someone can determine which file you downloaded. Hence the injecting of malware can't happen to Linux packages (if the private key is secured by the distro maker). Couldn't happen to any signed executable either, but on Windows users often blindly allow programs to run even with bad signatures.

about a month ago
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FTDI Removes Driver From Windows Update That Bricked Cloned Chips

caseih Re:Can the counterfeit chip be detected? (572 comments)

Obviously there is a way, since their malware driver was detecting it and *then* changing the pid to 0x0000. In fact you can see source code for this that someone posted to the Linux Kernel Mailing list a few days ago. Hopefully the new driver will do exactly as you suggest, though I think a big warning message box saying that the device is not genuine, but continue to function might be enough for end users to let companies know their devices are using the fake chips.

about a month ago
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Delivering Malicious Android Apps Hidden In Image Files

caseih Re:Still have to install (113 comments)

Well the fact of the matter is that Google is only interested in making sure their app store is the only trusted store. The choice to make it all or nothing was deliberate on their part. They could easily have implemented user-selectable trust of signing certificates. Granted 90% of android users don't even understand the problem, let alone the solution.

Still, though, this vulnerability appears to be firmly in the area of social engineering because why would I want to download an encrypted image file that requires another separate, random app to decrypt and view it?

about a month ago
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Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

caseih Re:That's all we need ... (555 comments)

So you know the majority of system administrators? That's an awful lot of people.

I follow the RHEL mailing list and there are a lot of very smart sysadmins on that list, and none of them have expressed any concern or even comment about systemd. And it's certainly shipping, and it's been on the roadmap for some time. In short, for many people it's a non issue.

This is, by all appearances, a tempest in a teacup, mostly existing here on on slashdot, where groupthink has moved against systemd without any real argument against it other than mumblings about philosophy, or theoretical problems that haven't been shown to even exist in systemd.

If these "supervision" frameworks of which you speak were redundant, then why do they exist in the first place? Clearly system v has had some pretty big limitations. I've personally hacked many a cronjob to supervise processes started by sys v init scripts (some of the init scripts I wrote myself... yuck). Also as servers move into virtual space, and deal with hotplugging of various resources, it just wasn't enough. Took years to get consistent naming on network interfaces, for example, and even then I could never be sure which interface was which when I first brought them up (they usually followed motherboard numbering, but not always). To say nothing of adding other hotplug interfaces of different sorts. Even after the udev hacks brought some sanity, every time I'd change out a network card, or clone it to a new system with a new MAC address I'd have to either delete the udev config for it, or have it change to eth1, eth2, etc. And by the way, it's not even systemd that does all this now, it's systemd-udevd. So it's still modular and you could replace systemd with uselessd, and then run a separately-packaged udev.

It's also telling that other major commerical Unix vendors (say, Solaris, for example) have abandoned sys v init as well, or at least abandoned shell scripts as part of the init system, for a more comprehensive and capable system and framework. I'm not sure if Apple ever used system v init, but they certainly abandoned the script system in general with 10.4 and LaunchDaemon. They had good reasons to do so.

about a month ago
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Apple Doesn't Design For Yesterday

caseih Re:I don't follow (370 comments)

Not always. His yacht was hideous!

about a month ago
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Apple Releases CUPS 2.0

caseih Re:OpenSSL support dropped... (178 comments)

Always good to hear things from the original source! Thanks for posting.

Just fyi, your "homepage" link refers to your old Easy Software web site, which no longer exists. Apparently an e-cigarette company has bought up your old domain name!

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Damaged US passport chip strands travelers

caseih caseih writes  |  more than 2 years ago

caseih writes "Damaging the embedded chip in your passport is now grounds for denying you the ability to travel in at least one airport in the US. Though the airport can slide the passport through the little number reader as easily as they can wave it in front of an RFID reader, they chose to deny a young child access to the flight, in essence denying the who family. The child had accidentally sat on his passport, creasing the cover, and the passport appeared worn. The claim has been made that breaking the chip in the passport shows that you disrespect the privilege of owning a passport, and that the airport was justified in denying this child from using the passport."
Link to Original Source
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Media doublepeak in reporting BPI raid

caseih caseih writes  |  more than 7 years ago

caseih writes "The BBC reports that "The British Phonographic Industry (BPI) is investigating allegations of an extensive illegal music filesharing ring at a Honeywell plant in Scotland." What's amazing is that the article treats this entire incident as if the BPI is somehow the equivalent of Scotland Yard or even the MI-5. Not only does the article report this as being the equivalent of real crime with hyperbole, invoking the inevideble comparison to fraug, human-smugging, or even pedophilia rings, but it also has some real gems like a quote from a so-called expert saying, "Filesharing music in the workplace is illegal, misuses company resources, wastes employees' time and introduces network security risks." Regardless of one's stance on the problems of copyright infringement, this kind of bad reporting really shows how the copyright cartels have gone too far."
Link to Original Source

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