×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

MIT Designs Tsunami Proof Floating Nuclear Reactor

cbhacking Re:Step 2. (160 comments)

We already have very advanced containment systems. There's nothing about them that would be unsuitable for oceanic use, aside from requiring a whole lot of floatation. The containment system at Fukushima wasn't even close to modern, yet it did a pretty good job anyhow. Hell, the system at Three Mile Island contained nearly all the radioactive material, and that was 35 years ago.

With even the Mark 1 containment building found at Fukushima (which was 40 years old; the same age as TMI), an incident like Chernobyl (which had *no* containment building) wouldn't have been nearly as bad. Compared to modern containment buildings though, Mark 1 isn't even *last* generation; it's outright obsolete.

yesterday
top

MIT Designs Tsunami Proof Floating Nuclear Reactor

cbhacking Re:We have them already. (160 comments)

Still, it's a reasonable proof-of-concept in many ways. Scaling it up and using a tethered platform instead of a mobile isn't a trivial engineering exercise, but we already know how to produce multi-GW nuclear plants. This gives us a good, safe place to put them. It also means they don't have to go sucking up precious river water for their heat exchangers and cooling towers; the ocean is as big a heat sink as we could hope for on Earth.

yesterday
top

Microsoft Brings Office Online To Chrome OS; Ars Reviews Windows Phone 8.1

cbhacking Re: WIndows 8.1 preview install instructions (67 comments)

If you have a Nokia, it's easy enough to flash the stock (8.0) OS back again using Nokia Care Suite. Probably also true for Samsung WP8 phones, which have a Flashing tool and ROMs have been released at least for some of them. Not sure about HTC or Huawei, but the latter has custom ROMs (so it's almost certainly possible to go back) and the former has *historically* had lots of flashing tools and at least stock ROMs available. Not sure for WP8 though.

yesterday
top

NASA To Send SpaceX Resupply Capsule To ISS Despite Technical Problems

cbhacking Re:Scrubbed ;_; (71 comments)

Space launches are tricky! SpaceX has an excellent mission success record so far, but a lot of that is because they're really, really careful around things that could cause a failure (distinct from an abort).

It's disappointing for sure, but it beats having a rocket blow up or lose control in orbit or something. That probably will happen eventually, but with any luck there will be a long-established safety record by then.

3 days ago
top

First Phase of TrueCrypt Audit Turns Up No Backdoors

cbhacking Re:To Crypt or Not To Crypt (171 comments)

A good strong PBKDF2 is probably sufficient, but yeah, 2k rounds is pathetic. iPhones were doing better (admittedly, their passphrases tend to be very short) several years ago, and that's on a mobile CPU. Having a limit of 2k rounds doesn't even make sense, it's not like it's harder to code it for more rounds or something. The only real limit should probably be 0xFFFFFFFF rounds (assuming 32-bit ints) because why have a limit at all?

3 days ago
top

Mozilla Appoints Former Marketing Head Interim CEO

cbhacking Re:Fantastic Google Chrome marketing (202 comments)

You are an idiot, several times over.

For one other, not everybody is fanatically partisan. I don't like Eich because he wanted to enshrine religiously motivated discrimination into law. I support gay marriage, and will continue to do so until the law gets out of marriage entirely and makes all the benefits which legally married couples receive instead available to everybody. I use Firefox just as much as I used to (it's not my primary browser, but I keep it installed and use it semi-regularly). The Democratic party receives more of my votes than the Republican party but I do not like Obama, Hillary, or the DNC; I voted for a third-party candidate. I will call anybody acting hypocritically a hyprocrite. For example, you took a non-partisan discussion (equality and corporate politics) and tried to imply that it was partisan (specifically, that Microlith is a blind supporter of the Democratic party) when in fact you just revealed your own partisan bias without refuting a single one of Microlith's points.

3 days ago
top

Mozilla Appoints Former Marketing Head Interim CEO

cbhacking Re:It's not enough (202 comments)

Flamebait doesn't have to be off-topic. Off-topic stuff is supposed to get modded off-topic, not flamebait. Flamebait is saying things to get people pissed off, like talking about Congress outing and ostracizing religious people, and linking to a news story about the "gay mafia" (about as idiotic a term as I've ever heard).

The other of the post emself admitted it was flamebait.

3 days ago
top

Mozilla Appoints Former Marketing Head Interim CEO

cbhacking Many, many ways (202 comments)

You distort facts to imply that they mean something other than what they mean, then act like you expect us to believe your "interpretation". For example, I don't really care what the Democratic party claims - I don't vote any party's line (nor do I support Obama generally speaking, except by comparison to some), and I look at voting records instead of claimed positions - but I doubt you'll find many on either side of the aisle who disagree with the claim that they support the constitution. The constitution explicitly gives the Judicial branch the ability to do what it did to Proposition 8 (overturn it on the basis of higher law). This is to prevent the tyranny of the majority over a disliked minority group, which is one of the obvious failures of a pure democracy. As for "activist judges", you do realize that 5 of the 9 current justices were Republican presidential nominations, right?

Oh, and lots of people who call themselves "orthodox" or "fundamentalist" members of the religions you listed are fine with gay marriage. *Your* view might be that this is inherently contradictory, but their view is that however unrighteous those people are is a matter between them and God but secular law should be fair to all, or that a God of love would not turn His back on somebody on account of who they love, or any of many other arguments. You will probably find many more such people like that than you will find people who believe that the wrathful or gluttonous are nearly so bad, and that (heterosexual) adulterers deserve death. As such, it is quite obvious that religious folk can go about their daily lives without trying to enforce their religious beliefs on others. If you personally cannot, that is a failure of you personally, not of society or even of religion.

Oh, and the bit about tolerance? You really didn't think that part through, did you... it's about creating a tolerant society, not about personally tolerating everything. You present a false dichotomy: tolerate everything including intolerance, or don't be "about tolerance". Try this thought on for size: "we advocate tolerance towards every individual's nature, but oppose those who choose to be intolerant of the nature of others." It may help some people to think of it as advocating tolerance towards the ways in which God created us, and opposing those who are intolerant of some of God's creations. After all, sin is supposed to be about (making the wrong) choice, right? Are we not innocent and pure, until we choose to be otherwise? Well, religious belief is a choice. Sexual orientation is not.

Finally, there's the fact that you cite Fox News, which is just stupid around here. Even assuming that the story was both accurate and unbiased (having read both sides, Fox's account is generally the first but far from the second), that's just asking for trouble. The stories were widely reported; you can find better sources than that.

For the first story, Emmanuel is, to the best of my knowledge (though IANAL), not allowed to deny or revoke business licenses on the grounds of an implied intention to discriminate; an actual act of discrimination or at least a policy requiring it would be required first.

For the second story, that's straightforward: if you run a business open to the public, you are not permitted to discriminate against certain classes of people and refuse them service. This has probably been law since before you were born, in the case of racial discrimination (incidentally, at least one religion in the US held that black skin was the "mark of Cain" and thus they were justified in refusing to interact with them) and for that matter in the case of religion (which, unlike skin color or sexual orientation, is a matter of choice) or several other classifications. Oregon had simply expanded the list of classes against which a public business may not discriminate to include sexual orientation. If "Sweet Cakes by Melissa" had in fact been a Christian bakery - that is, a religious entity only open to Christians - they would probably have won their case. They were not.

For the third story, I'm amused that you chose an article that, aside from using a deliberately inflammatory leading question as a title, really doesn't support your views at all. The conclusion of that article is essentially thus: "he stepped down because of internal opposition to having somebody whose expressed views were contrary to company policy running the company". Or, in a simple answer to the title headline (and usually the right answer, when a headline asks a leading question): "No".

I'd congratulate you on reading something other than Fox News, but it looks like you didn't actually read that article before linking it. Oops.

Offtopic warning
Speaking of Fox News' credibility (off-topic but it was fun doing some research), I'll grant that the popular version of the story of Fox News winning a court case on the right to intentionally spread lies appears to be misleading, but some digging suggests that Fox does not, in fact, believe themselves under any requirement to tell the truth. The Fox News station WVTV was sued after it fired two reporters for threatening to tell the FCC that they were being required to insert untrue material into their news stories. WVTV won the lawsuit (on appeal) on the grounds that the reporters where not whistleblowers (which would have protected them) because “We agree with WTVT that the FCC’s policy against the intentional falsification of the news – which the FCC has called its “news distortion policy” – does not qualify as the required “law, rule, or regulation” under section 448.102.”
http://www.campaignfreedom.org... (see comments as well)
http://www.relfe.com/media_can...
http://www.foxbghsuit.com/sj04...
http://www.spj.org/a-ethics.as... (1998)

3 days ago
top

Mozilla Appoints Former Marketing Head Interim CEO

cbhacking Re:How do you know the company is dying? (202 comments)

Normally I might agree, but Firefox doesn't need to market in the same way that other companies do. Their income comes from very non-traditional sources, and their products are free. That's not to say I *like* the idea of marketing running the place, but I think it's better than it sounds. Mozilla's marketing has been about awareness, much more than about trying to sell something.

3 days ago
top

Apple's Spotty Record of Giving Back To the Tech Industry

cbhacking Re:Small donations to organizations are one thing (266 comments)

Oh, please. OS X / Darwin's implementation of the Unix standard is screwier than half the Linux distros I've used. It's the same from Mac to Mac, sure, but that doesn't mean much; the same applies from SLES machine to SLES machine or from Nokia N900 to Nokia N900. Their filesystem layout is weird, they don't use standard files for some things, or do so bizarrely (some years back, I found their fstab manpage to be wrong and the file itself to be basically useless). Their user system is not entirely conventional.

There is no such singular thing as "the real Unix command line" but I could get a (descendent of) Bourne shell on versions of NT earlier than OS X existed.

4 days ago
top

Private Keys Stolen Within Hours From Heartbleed OpenSSL Site

cbhacking Re:Tools for checking (151 comments)

The cool feature of Pacemaker is that it checks TLS *clients*, actually. There are other tools for server checks (one of which is included with Pacemaker) but it's actually very important to make sure any clients you have are invulnerable to Heartbleed as well. Software that ships with bundled or integrated OpenSSL libraries - and I've seen quite a few - could be vulnerable to this.

4 days ago
top

Private Keys Stolen Within Hours From Heartbleed OpenSSL Site

cbhacking Re:https is dead (151 comments)

If the server (or client, for that matter) was hit with Heartbleed *during* (or shortly after) the session, the symmetric encryption key may have been retrieved and an attacker who had recorded the whole session could then decrypt it. If the session was ongoing and they were in position to do so, they could MitM it.

Similarly, if the attacker used Heartbleed during the key exchange, they might have leaked the private information (from either endpoint) needed to derive the symmetric key, even if for some reason they didn't get they key directly. Same impact as above.

If the attacker had used Heartbleed to steal the authentication private key prior to your session, they could have hit you with a MitM attack (appearing to be the authentic server) and you wouldn't have known.

If the attacker recorded your session but did not MitM it *or* use Heartbleed on the server while the symmetric key was in memory, you're safe (even if they stole the private key beforehand, much less afterward). That's the beauty of PFS.

4 days ago
top

Private Keys Stolen Within Hours From Heartbleed OpenSSL Site

cbhacking Re:The CA should not revoke the certificates, (151 comments)

So does IE10.

Internet Options -> Advanced -> Security (scroll near bottom) -> "Check for publisher's certificate revocation" and "Check for server's certificate revocation" are both checked for me. I know at least one of those options dates back to IE6, in fact, although it may have been inactive by default back then. I don't know when those options were made default, but at a guess I'd say IE8 or IE9.

As a side note, if you are running Vista or later but *not* on IE11, you have TLS 1.1 and 1.2 disabled by default. They're easy to turn on (same place as above, just scroll a bit lower).

4 days ago
top

Civilization: Beyond Earth Announced

cbhacking Re:AI Optimization? (85 comments)

Your requests are, unfortunately, somewhat contradictory. You ask for a smarter AI (that doesn't put ranged units in front, for example) and then ask for one that processes faster. You complain about the late-game AI time (where the decision trees are *huge*), then say you want the AI to give a harder game without handicaps.

Don't get me wrong, I want to see optimizations too. But, I think they did a pretty decent job of balance, especially in the expansions (the original game was kind of bad in many ways, AI included). Diplomacy has gotten a *lot* better, partially because the AI's motivations are more transparent.The AI unit management is non-ideal, but it's rarely outright bad anymore (and can in fact be really good at specific goals, like "capture that barbarian camp"). As for handicaps, the AI *does* play dumber/friendlier at the lower difficulties, and always has; the point at which the AI starts needing to cheat, and the degree of its cheating, has crept up over time though.

5 days ago
top

Civilization: Beyond Earth Announced

cbhacking Re:Shut up and take my money (85 comments)

Those are good critiques of Civ5. There are a more, of course, but *most* of them boil down to the original release of the game being, basically, too big a change for them to get it right.

Let me say that again: Civ 5 was *badly* flawed at release, because it was too big a change.

For example, in a game where each unit (and tile, since they go together) is so much more precious than they were before, the 10HP system (where even a curbstomp battle costs 10% of your health, and the enemy rolling just a *little* too well can easily kill a unit that should have been wounded but near-guaranteed to survive) is stupid. They fixed that in the first expansion, and it made combat *much* better.

Then there's the silliness where ranged units turn into melee units as they upgrade. That is, sadly, still present in a few units (chariot archers, etc.) but it's way less common than it once was, and there are actual ranged units in the late-game now.

The original culture system was undeniably silly. The new one is better in many ways, although the lines between things that give faith and things that give culture and things that give tourism still feels a bit arbitrary. I mean, shouldn't world wonders *inherently* give tourism? Shouldn't religious buildings have a cultural impact as well? It's weird.

On the other hand, there are good things that I think you missed, too. You complain about three ways to trade in C5:BNW, but I see more than that (unit transfers are not explicitly trades, but they achieve much the same thing, and AI goodwill is effectively a commodity you can sometimes trade) and Alpha Centauri had the same things (Econ tech + treaties, direct trade over comlink, vote-buying in council). The tech tree has plenty of absurdities, but what else is new? That's hardly something Civ5-specific, and the power level progressions throughout the game are pretty good.

5 days ago
top

IRS Misses XP Deadline, Pays Microsoft Millions For Patches

cbhacking Re:Wow! If this is the way things work (322 comments)

If they prematurely (i.e. before they said they were going to) EOL their products, yet continue to have any meaningful funds, a lawsuit would almost certainly follow. Not a great way to make money.

5 days ago
top

Heartbleed OpenSSL Vulnerability: A Technical Remediation

cbhacking Several! (239 comments)

There have been a number of sites.
SSLLabs scanner has been updated to check for Heartbleed, and also will report when the cert validity starts (handy if you want to see whether they're using a new cert). https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltes...
LastPass has a pretty decent scanner that just focuses on Heartbleed (without all the other info that you get from SSLLabs): https://lastpass.com/heartblee...
There are some others out there as well, of course.

There's even one for client-side testing (almost as critical):
Pacemaker is an awesome little POC script (python 2.x) for testing whether a *client* is vulnerable (many that use OpenSSL are...). https://github.com/Lekensteyn/...

about a week ago
top

Heartbleed OpenSSL Vulnerability: A Technical Remediation

cbhacking Re:OSX not affected? (239 comments)

0.9.8 doesn't support any protocol newer than TLS 1.0, so while it's safe from heartbleed it's also old and verging on deprecated.

Also, it's not that rare for software to use its own copy of OpenSSL, either is a bundled library or statically compiled into the program. I don't actually know of any Mac software that I'm sure does this, but that's not saying much since I don't use a Mac. Things I would expect to find it in are cross-platform programs that use OpenSSL but want a newer branch than 0.9.8 (Python maybe?)

about a week ago
top

Heartbleed OpenSSL Vulnerability: A Technical Remediation

cbhacking Re:Don't forget about the other recent problems (239 comments)

Well, Microsoft's CAPI (CryptoAPI) actually, not IIS. IIS uses CAPI, but IIS is no more a crypto toolkit than Apache or lighttpd are. A vuln in CAPI (they've happened before) could also affect clients (IE, Outlook, anything else using the platform APIs...).

Besides, we're still waiting on a NSS issue. NSS isn't so much *broadly* used - I know of only a few product families that use it - as it is *heavily* used. The product families in question are Mozilla anything (Firefox, mostly; the N stands for "Netscape") and Chrome (for PCs). Very few browsers (though not zero; Chrome on Android 4.1 uses a vulnerable version of OpenSSL) are/were vulnerable to Heartbleed, but they'll get their turn eventually!

about a week ago
top

Navy Debuts New Railgun That Launches Shells at Mach 7

cbhacking Re:Difficult to defend against (630 comments)

Clearly, the solution is railgun-based point defense! Sure, it'll have a lower rate of fire than the current CIWS units, but imagine the light show you'd get from the sparks when of a pair of opposing slugs run into each other at a combined mach 12 or so?

Impractical today, of course, but technology marches on. In the meantime, it isn't actually that hard to deflect the projectile enough... if you can hit it at any meaningful distance. That's going to be quite impractical (just hitting it at all is likely impractical) so for the moment, yeah. Add to that the ability to scale up the gun faster than people can realistically produce defense (my WAG there, but I suspect it's true nonetheless) and offense is taking a lead right now.

On the other hand, that's been true for a long time in a different way, which also brings me to the best defensive measure I can think of: a few hundred feet of H2O. Phalanx can't hit a torpedo, either...

about a week ago

Submissions

top

Microsoft allowing WP8 users to get updates directly

cbhacking cbhacking writes  |  about 6 months ago

cbhacking (979169) writes "In June of 2012, Microsoft announced that they would be providing a system whereby "registered [Windows Phone] enthusiasts get early access to updates" without waiting for carrier approval and broad distribution. For more than a year, that has been an unfulfilled promise, and for many users, updates have been delayed or may even still be unavailable. Today, coinciding with the release of WP8 Update 3 (a.k.a. GDR3), Microsoft is allowing "developers" (anybody who has enabled app sideloading on their phone) to opt into a "Windows Phone Preview" program to allow updating immediately.

Like the update itself, this is likely a move in response to consumer demand and comparisons to iOS and Android, as there is little in the update which specifically interests developers. However, the program does warn that participation may invalidate your device's warranty; this may have been required by the carriers to relieve concerns of high support costs in the event of a botched update. While only the Microsoft portion of the updates (as opposed to driver firmware or OEM customizations) are available through this program, participating phones will also continue to receive public updates as they are rolled out."
top

Zune 3.0: Wireless Purchase, Games, 16GB

cbhacking cbhacking writes  |  more than 5 years ago

cbhacking writes "Microsoft released the Zune 3.0 yesterday. The device firmware has been immensely upgraded: it now supports connecting to wireless access points, sampling and purchasing music through a built-in store interface, playing games, and several other new things. You can read Microsoft's blurb on what's new at zune.net.

The Windows software has also been improved, etter integrating the social features.

Additionally, zunes are now available in more colors, the 4GB flash player is being discontinued for a 16GB player, and there's now a HDD-based 120GB model."

Link to Original Source
top

CrossOver Games released for Linux, OS X

cbhacking cbhacking writes  |  about 6 years ago

cbhacking writes "CodeWeavers, the company that supports the open-source Wine project that allows running Windows applications on UNIX-like operating systems, has released CrossOver Games for Linux and OS X. The launch includes a considerable list of supported titles, including such popular (and graphically intensive) games as EVE Online, Counterstrike: Source (and other Steam games), and World of WarCraft.

A trial version is also available for download."

Link to Original Source
top

Microsoft .NET source to be available for viewing

cbhacking cbhacking writes  |  more than 6 years ago

cbhacking writes "A post on the blog of Microsoft's Scott Guthrie has some exciting news for .NET developers: with the release of Visual Studio 2008 later this year, the .NET Framework 3.5 source code will be released for reference purposes. Most of the libraries, including System.Runtime, System.Security, System.Windows.Forms, and System.Web will be made available with the release of VS2008, with more some additional non-core libraries coming later. The code will be available for either standalone download and viewing, or as debugging symbols with associated source for integrated debugging with VS2008.

There's a catch though: although the license abbreviation used in the post, MS-RL, usually refers to the copyleft and OSI-approved Microsoft Reciprocal License (which allows modification and redistribution), the license actually explicitly mentioned and linked to is the Microsoft Reference License, which prohibits modification or redistribution. Although an open-source release of the code would be great, this is still likely to be very helpful for debugging, examining behavior of the libraries, and selecting the correct methods or algorithms for a given situation."
top

Iraq Whistleblower Imprisoned, Tortured

cbhacking cbhacking writes  |  more than 6 years ago

cbhacking writes "Forbes.com has a telling story on the fraud and corruption that has plagues the Iraqi reconstruction efforts and, more frighteningly, the harsh penalties faced by whistleblowers. Many have been vilified, demoted, or fired outright. Now, the story has come out of Navy veteran Donald Vance, who was working as a civilian in an Iraqi company. After reporting to the FBI that his company was making illegal sales of military weapons to customers ranging from State Department workers to Iraqi insurgents, Vance was held without a trial for 97 days in Camp Cropper, an American military prison outside Baghdad. During his time there, he was subjected to "that head-banging music blaring dawn to dusk and interrogators yelling the same questions over and over."

Vance is now back in the USA and, along with a colleague who helped him gather evidence and was treated similarly in return, has filed a federal lawsuit alleging they were illegally imprisoned and subjected to physical and mental interrogation tactics "reserved for terrorists and so-called enemy combatants.""

Link to Original Source
top

cbhacking cbhacking writes  |  more than 7 years ago

cbhacking writes "Previously, searching for 'Powertoy Vista' has been a quick road to failure. However, Brandon Paddock, a MS developer, has independently produced and is maintaining a very handy tool called Search++ that adds all kinds of capabilities to the built in desktop search.
Some of the standard features are things like typing 'g <search string>' to launch a Google search, or 'play[artist|album] <name>' to find and start playing music. Another, very nice for those of us who start almost all programs in Vista from the Start menu, is the ability to start programs with elevated permissions via 'sudo <Program>'.
The basic features are great and very easy to use, but Start++ is also extensible and user-modifiable. You can even import additional search tools (called 'Startlets'), and export your own Startlets.
You can download Search++ and additional Startlets here."
top

cbhacking cbhacking writes  |  more than 7 years ago

cbhacking writes "ABC News has a well-written review of the latest version of the Microsoft Office suite, which has been shipped to manufacturers. Representing the first major upgrade since 2003, Office 2007 has an incredible and instantly visible collection of new features, including an innovative new interface. For those who downloaded the public beta (all ~5 million of us), Office 2007 has already shown itself to be an amazing software suite.

The review includes overall impressions of the new version, plus ratings of the most common individual apps. It is mostly positive, from the easy learning curve for the new interface and the capabilities it offers, to the number of things Microsoft finally got RIGHT, to the good migration tools.

In addition to the many tools and tips the review mentions, I would add the ability of Word to (via plugins) read/write ODF and to export to PDF and Microsoft's new XPS format."
top

cbhacking cbhacking writes  |  more than 7 years ago

cbhacking writes "The Pentagon is currently considering options for developing "the ability to strike targets around the world within an hour." According to Space.com, there are several main options being considered: an "Advanced Hypersonic Weapon", placing weapon payloads on small space launch vehicles, fitting missile submarines with a new design of ballistic missile with a conventional payload, or placing conventional warheads on the (traditionally nuclear) Trident missiles our subs currently carry.

Aside from the coolness factor of an autonomous hypersonic vehicle which achieves suborbital altitudes but for the most part flies towards its target like an aircraft, the main advantage of the Advanced Hypersonic Weapon seems to be that it wouldn't be confused with a nuclear launch. Several prominent people, including Ted "Series of Tubes" Stevens, have suggested that using Trident missiles would be dangerous as it may cause other countries to believe we are launching nuclear warheads at them. However, it appears to be the option involving the least re-invention of the wheel, and could be operational "before the end of this decade."

The option of weaponizing space launch vehicles seems to already be facing significant opposition. The Advanced Hypersonic Weapon is receiving some funding, but re-arming the Tridents is out at least until completion of a report on — among other things — the military and political issues.

Is it just me, or aren't there any major reasons the other weapons couldn't be equipped with nuclear warheads anyhow? Do we actually need a different weapon for everything?"
top

cbhacking cbhacking writes  |  more than 7 years ago

cbhacking writes "The Windows Vista Team has posted a blog about the "Express Upgrade" program. Basically, if you buy a new computer with XP, Microsoft will make the upgrade to Vista available for a relatively low price.

The edition(s) you can upgrade to through this offer vary by what edition of XP you have. For example, Media Center will upgrade to Vista Home Premium, and Professional or Tablet to Vista Business, for a nominal cost. XP Home can be upgraded to either Vista Home Basic or Premium, for a 50% discount off the normal upgrade pricing. Enterprise and Ultimate are not offered in this list. Note that the upgrade versions of Vista will already cost less than the full retail versions; this program reduces the cost further for people who purchase a PC just before Vista comes out (or shortly thereafter).

It seems that very few people actually upgrade the OS; they simply buy a new computer with the new version. Maybe this program will increase the Vista install base in its first few months?"

Journals

top

Another major music store offers unrestricted MP3s

cbhacking cbhacking writes  |  more than 6 years ago

When I started the RealNetworks Rhapsody software this morning, I discovered a cause for some celebration by anybody who supports DRM-free music purchases: the Rhapsody store is now offering some unrestricted MP3 downloads. At present only about 5000 albums (roughly 50000 songs) are available, but that is just an initial offer - I haven't even found an announcement anywhere - and they claim to be working to increase the number of MP3 tracks available.

The MP3s are encoded at 256kbps, and cost no more than the standard DRM-crippled music (which is also 256kbps) at 89c/song for subscribing members, or 99c/song for non-subscribers (the subscription gives the ability to listen to streamed music on demand, starting at $13/month). Prices are US dollars, and I don't know whether the service is available internationally.

The bad news: downloading the music requires running the Rhapsody player software (version 4, just released) and at present it's only available on Windows. Online streaming is available to other OSes through http://rhapsody.com/ (works in Firefox, via a plugin) but the cross-platform Real Player software cannot access the music store, and last I tried it wouldn't run in wine.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...