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Computer Scientist Parachutes From 135,908 Feet, Breaking Record

cdrudge Re: Not to be outdone (161 comments)

Right. The orbit is 36,000 km from the surface, or a radius of 42,000 km, a difference of...6,000km

yesterday
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Computer Scientist Parachutes From 135,908 Feet, Breaking Record

cdrudge Re:Not to be outdone (161 comments)

MIR isn't that high currently since it was deorbited in March of 2001. Prior to that, it was at an altitude 364 km +/- 10km depending on where it was at in orbit.

Geostationary orbit is ~36,000 km from earth (radius ~42,164km). The moon is 384,000 km (+/- 21000 miles)

yesterday
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FTDI Removes Driver From Windows Update That Bricked Cloned Chips

cdrudge Re:Computer Missues Act 1990 (509 comments)

But in the mean time, your product looks bad, which makes your company look bad. You may suffer far more than what your vendor will, or their vendor, or however far up it goes in the supply chain.

Another thing is that FTDI may hurt their actual customers that inadvertently received the fake chips. If I'm a manufacturer I wouldn't be happy that somehow my supplier got the fake chips, and I'd understand the actual company not supporting the fakes, but I would rethink whether I want to use a company that harmed me in the process of protecting themselves.

yesterday
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FTDI Removes Driver From Windows Update That Bricked Cloned Chips

cdrudge Re:Computer Missues Act 1990 (509 comments)

They didn't disable it though, they simply moved the PID off their allocated range.

Was it their chip? No? Then they shouldn't touch it, regardless if it was a counterfeit chip or not. Two wrongs don't make a right. Turn the other cheek. Blah blah blah.

The chip still works, just not with FTDI's drivers.[/blockquote>This is the correct solution. I don't think anyone would have an issue if the FTDI driver just didn't work with the fake chip.

Nothing was broken.

Depends on your point of view. From the consumer/end user's point of view, I think they would disagree whether something was broken or not if one day it worked with one driver, one day it didn't with the newer driver, and rolling back the driver didn't fix it.

yesterday
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FTDI Removes Driver From Windows Update That Bricked Cloned Chips

cdrudge Re:Computer Missues Act 1990 (509 comments)

Why would FTDI have to ensure their driver doesn't break chips that aren't theirs? There's no agreement, licensing, or goodwill.

FTDI doesn't have to ensure that their driver doesn't break chips. It sounds however that FTDI went out of their way to detect whether the chip was a counterfeit or not, and if it was, specifically write to it to disable it when it could have just as easily done nothing (as disabling the driver from functioning).

yesterday
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Incapacitating Chemical Agents: Coming Soon To Local Law Enforcement?

cdrudge Re:Geneva Convention? (139 comments)

This stuff wouldn't be allowed in warfare, why is it allowed in use by civilian agencies?

Because the Chemical Weapons Convention explicitly allows it:

9. "Purposes Not Prohibited Under this Convention" means
...
(d) Law enforcement including domestic riot control purposes.

My guess is that countries wanted to prohibit an opponent from using it on them (in case TPTB weren't prepared) but wanted to reserve the right to use it on citizens (when TPTB are prepared).

yesterday
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The Classic Control Panel In Windows May Be Gone

cdrudge Re:Environment Variables (346 comments)

I believe that was just an IIS 6 (and maybe before) "feature". IIS 7.5 running on my Windows 7 dev machine sorts them alphabetically by site name.

2 days ago
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FTDI Reportedly Bricking Devices Using Competitors' Chips.

cdrudge Re:Why is FTDI the villan? (688 comments)

With your example, it happens all the time. A few years ago when the Super Bowl was being held in Indianapolis, the FBI raided multiple stores that were selling counterfeit merchandise on behalf of the NFL. The merchandise that was confiscated was either ultimately destroyed or given to the NFL which donates it to some 3rd world location. So while the NFL itself didn't destroy the car, ultimately in the end the store was left hanging as it didn't have it's money, nor it's apparel it was suppose to be selling.

2 days ago
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Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

cdrudge Re: Entirely preventable software error (115 comments)

All kidding aside, when I read that line I wondered what type of software error isn't preventable. There's things that are easily preventable and should be thought of, but ANYTHING is "entirely preventable".

2 days ago
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Samsung Acknowledges and Fixes Bug On 840 EVO SSDs

cdrudge Re:DOS version? (101 comments)

The same way that you're suppose to run their DOS executable on a Linux?

3 days ago
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Samsung Acknowledges and Fixes Bug On 840 EVO SSDs

cdrudge Re:What about the Dell knockoffs? (101 comments)

Shouldn't you ask Dell that? Welcome to buying OEM-ed manufactured equipment. You (possibly) saved as you're now Dell's customer, not Samsung's.

3 days ago
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As Prison Population Sinks, Jails Are a Steal

cdrudge Re:Ahem. (407 comments)

Obviously the reason why crime is down is because they are equipped like tank battalions. We must equip them with more in order to keep lowering the crime rates. You don't want to see crime rates increase, do you? And if rates do happen to go up, obviously we didn't equip them well enough so they deserve EVEN MORE!

about a week ago
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HBO To Offer Online Streaming Without TV Subscription

cdrudge Re:I am not alone when I say.... (139 comments)

They will not remove DRM, because the studios they license films from demand it.

So how's that mandatory DRM working out for them these days?

about a week ago
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VeraCrypt Is the New TrueCrypt -- and It's Better

cdrudge Re:Oblig xkcd (220 comments)

Tell that to H. Beatty Chadwick. He was jailed for 14 years for contempt of court for not handing over something he claimed he didn't have. He was never actually charged with committing a crime. While 14 years isn't holding you forever, I think many would still classify it as rotting away in prison.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Can't Google Block Spam In Gmail?

cdrudge Re:Not me... (261 comments)

Have you tried contacting Google?

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Can't Google Block Spam In Gmail?

cdrudge Re:Not me... (261 comments)

Does your domain have SPF and/or DKIM set up? Does your server have a correct rDNS entry? Is your server on a static IP address?

about two weeks ago
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Ubisoft Claims CPU Specs a Limiting Factor In Assassin's Creed Unity On Consoles

cdrudge Re:NES limits (338 comments)

I never said that there weren't limitations. There obviously is...it's an 8 bit platform running at a clock frequency less than I think what my watch runs at.

But seriously I find much more enjoyment, even now, playing old retro games from my childhood growing up with a NES and SNES than what I do playing modern games. I think the games were more original with better stories even if the graphics and sound were inferior.

It's much like how a well written book is far superior to a high def movie. My eyes may not see as beautiful of an image and my ears may not hear it, but my imagination more than compensates for even the best vision and hearing.

about two weeks ago
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Ubisoft Claims CPU Specs a Limiting Factor In Assassin's Creed Unity On Consoles

cdrudge boo hoo hoo (338 comments)

Boo fricking hoo. Learn to develop a game with what you have and quit yer bitching.

The best damn video game console ever was 8 bits, ran on a single core (usually), at 1.79 MHz IIRC. Gamers then logged just as many hours saving princesses, shooting aliens, and stacking blocks as what gamers do today. And guess what...they loved it. They fucking ate it up and went back for seconds and thirds. No, it wasn't photo-realistic 3D video with dolby-i-don't-give-a-crap sound and 87 button LCD-screen force feedback controllers. We didn't need it because we could have fun with what we had and didn't worry about frame rates or pixel resolutions or how many cores a OS management thread ran on vs graphics cores vs whatever.

Game designers these days, spoiled rotten little twerps that whine about everything.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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cdrudge cdrudge writes  |  more than 7 years ago

cdrudge (68377) writes "A federal jury on Thursday said Vonage Holdings Corp. violated 3 of 5 patents of Verizon Communications Inc. and ordered the upstart Internet-phone company to pay $58m in damages as well 5.5% in royalty fees per month per customer. Verizon said it would seek an injunction to block Vonage from using its patented technology. The jury did reject Verizon's claim of $200m in damages and that Vonage deliberately violated Verizon's patents. As you might expect, Vonage said it would appeal the decision and seek a stay if an injunction is granted. Judge Claude Hilton set a hearing for March 23 on whether to grant an injunction."

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