×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Turing's Theory of Chemical Morphogenesis Validated 60 Years After His Death

cduffy Re:Please stop linking paywalled papers. (74 comments)

publishers pay the people who fronted money for the study

If only they did.

Funds paid to scientific publishers pay for editing, not for the original studies. Moreover, peer review -- the most important part of the process -- is almost universally done for free by other scientists in the field; the publishers are just mediators in that process, adding minimal value.

about a month and a half ago
top

Turing's Theory of Chemical Morphogenesis Validated 60 Years After His Death

cduffy Re:Please stop linking paywalled papers. (74 comments)

Someone's got to pay to fund the research.

...but that someone isn't generally the publishers running the paywalls, so how is that relevant?

about a month and a half ago
top

BPAS Appeals £200,000 Fine Over Hacked Website

cduffy Re:so they got an anti-abortion judge (104 comments)

I may be wrong on this, but in the US, HIPAA would rule the day on such a case, no? That would mean that 200k Pounds Sterling would be a wee drop in the bucket compared to the fine such an organization would face here should it face a data leak of that magnitude.

You're making substantial assumptions about what kind of teeth HIPAA has. When I worked at a medical software company -- wherein I was directly responsible for systems handling patient data, went through HIPAA training, and worked directly with our HIPAA compliance officer to determine technical measures -- it was damned near toothless; what we spent hiring said officer and taking said measures was much more than we would have been fined for a single breach. (We wouldn't have been able to sell the system or satisfy investors unless we could pass an audit, so it was the right business decision to make, but much of what our compliance officer told us was how much work we didn't have to do; the actual compliance requirements often fell far short of what I considered best practices).

about a month and a half ago
top

Google Funds San Francisco Bus Rides For Poor

cduffy Re:I don't get it. -- so what happened? (362 comments)

which viewpoint prevailed (if any)?

Nobody won -- the developer is holding the property, which remains zoned industrial, until market conditions (financing availability) and political considerations give them more leeway in its use.

about 1 month ago
top

Google Funds San Francisco Bus Rides For Poor

cduffy Re:I don't get it. (362 comments)

I understand the plain meaning of the words. I objected to their subtext. This, too, should be fairly straightforward English language comprehension.

about 1 month ago
top

Google Funds San Francisco Bus Rides For Poor

cduffy Re:I don't get it. (362 comments)

Gentrification typically displaces people who are previously reasonably happy living in a neighborhood "unfit for human habitation".

If the prior residents considered it fit for themselves (or, at least, the best fit available given their means)... well, you tell me what conclusion I should draw.

about 1 month ago
top

Google Funds San Francisco Bus Rides For Poor

cduffy Re:I don't get it. (362 comments)

Uh, no - it means people who make significantly less money than me tend to live in unsafe places.

...and when those places are "gentrified", the people in question are forced to move by rising rents, typically into another "unsafe" location but now with more transportation time/costs.

about 1 month ago
top

Google Funds San Francisco Bus Rides For Poor

cduffy Re:I don't get it. (362 comments)

I will never understand how flowing money into an area is bad.

Pricing people out of the homes and neighborhoods they're established in is disruptive. If your rents go up by 50% -- or you own, but your property taxes double -- that's a nontrivial personal hardship, particularly for folks who don't have wiggle room in their budgets to start with.

I live in East Austin -- a historically poor neighborhood. Last time I got involved in community governance was interesting -- went to a meeting to discuss whether a developer should be given a license to redevelop a recycling plant into a condominium project.

Half the people there -- including the faction I showed up with -- wanted to insist on mixed-use development with storefront space. The other group -- representing historical neighborhood residents -- wanted to ensure that low-income housing was included in the development. It wasn't feasible to accommodate both of us with the available funding; suffice to say that the debate process was informative.

about 1 month ago
top

Google Funds San Francisco Bus Rides For Poor

cduffy Re:I don't get it. (362 comments)

[...] everything to do with gentrification - Not a bad word, BTW, it just means making the slums safe for human habitation again.

So people who make less money than you are also less than human?

If you can't appreciate why gentrification is a problem, I suggest that you're living in quite a bubble.

about 2 months ago
top

Rolls Royce Developing Drone Cargo Ships

cduffy Re:until someone hacks it (216 comments)

I do information security for a living. [...]

So do I.

Pulling off an effective MITM assumes that the ends aren't doing effective mutual validation. Now, that's true much, much more often than it should be, but jumping from "most people do X badly" to "Y's effort to implement X is doomed to failure" isn't exactly a reasonable position when X doesn't violate any theoretical constraints (as so many attempted products do -- "X must have a key to decrypt Y, but must not be able to copy Y", etc).

about 2 months ago
top

Rolls Royce Developing Drone Cargo Ships

cduffy Re:until someone hacks it (216 comments)

...and you need to keep control of that vehicle for a few weeks to get it into a friendly port for unloading, during which time (1) folks with guns are doing their best to find you, and (2) you have no hostages to use as bargaining chips if they do so.

That's an awfully high-risk venture to get the kind of talent you'd need to hijack control in the first place [stealing private keys used to encrypt/authenticate the control chanel, etc] to sign off on.

about 2 months ago
top

"Microsoft Killed My Pappy"

cduffy Re:Change (742 comments)

FTFY. No need for subtlety.

Or accuracy, apparently. That story was debunked.

about 2 months ago
top

Can Reactive Programming Handle Complexity?

cduffy Re:Ditto (149 comments)

even worse then. you must be paying for the automation with speed.

"Must"?

If you pay attention, you might notice that the languages in question have strong metaprogramming support (and one of them has native immutable data structures with structural-sharing updates and typical log32n performance, and transactional memory baked in deep).

The metaprogramming support means that there's lots of room to do compile-time analysis and optimization, and the native transactional memory support means that the cell abstractions aren't doing much that the language's designers haven't already put a lot of effort into making fast.

Sure, there's performance overhead -- but it's overhead that's built to parallelize well. Whereas traditional locking can deadlock, Clojure ensures that there's always useful work going on somewhere -- the worst case you get into is that other threads' work needs to be thrown away on conflict. That's a model that scales a lot better to the highly parallel hardware of a decade from now than the conventional approaches today.

about 2 months ago
top

New 'pCell' Technology Could Bring Next Generation Speeds To 4G Networks

cduffy Re: Don't hold your breath (120 comments)

That's why "subsidized" is a relevant thing. :)

about 2 months ago
top

New 'pCell' Technology Could Bring Next Generation Speeds To 4G Networks

cduffy Re: Don't hold your breath (120 comments)

No; they support only their own hardware (Moto X w/ custom firmware).

On the other hand, it's a no-contract subsidized current-gen phone, and it's the first device I've had where manufacturer firmware is actually an improvement on AOSP.

about 2 months ago
top

New 'pCell' Technology Could Bring Next Generation Speeds To 4G Networks

cduffy Re: Don't hold your breath (120 comments)

I switched over from T-Mo. Republic's implementation is considerably better, particularly the handoff support.

about 2 months ago
top

New 'pCell' Technology Could Bring Next Generation Speeds To 4G Networks

cduffy Re: Don't hold your breath (120 comments)

If I could get reliable cell coverage in my home, I'd pay $200-300 for that.

Switch to Republic, and your voice, SMS and MMS all run over your WiFi, and hand off to Sprint's cell network when out-of-range.

Which gives you reliable coverage in your home, and a deep discount from a typical carrier's monthly rates.

-- Satisfied customer. (Well, moderately satisfied -- Sprint's 4G coverage in Austin was iffy until they got a bunch of tower repairs done; that they let it go for such a long time didn't speak well).

about 2 months ago
top

Can Reactive Programming Handle Complexity?

cduffy Re:Ditto (149 comments)

RIght. but now you are deleting most of the appeal of reactive programming by having to go back to explicitly managing dependencies.

I do? I didn't notice myself explicitly managing dependencies when using Trellis or Hoplon.

about 2 months ago
top

Apple Rumored To Be Exploring Medical Devices, Electric Cars To Reignite Growth

cduffy Re:Take medicine away from the wizards (255 comments)

Well. I really shouldn't be letting myself getting sucked into this, but.

A world in which freedom of contract is unhindered is a world in which Shelley v. Kramer would have been differently decided. I prefer not to live in that world.

about 2 months ago
top

Can Reactive Programming Handle Complexity?

cduffy Re:Ditto (149 comments)

You can't assure when, where and how variables might be changing in some outer reaches of your program while another part of the program is assuming they are momentarily fixed.

Huh? All the reactive programming frameworks I've used (Python's Trellis, various cell-model approaches in Clojure) have transactional memory, so things never appear to be happening in parallel.

Reactive programming without transactional memory is Doing It Wrong.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

cduffy hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

cduffy has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...