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Why CurrentC Will Beat Out Apple Pay

ceoyoyo Re:Not a chance (627 comments)

Almost everybody already carries a phone, and pays a lot more attention to where their phones are. Carrying a card in addition is inconvenient and easier to lose. The phone is certainly more secure than a mag stripe and about the same security as a chip card, and has the added benefit that any secondary identification you do is on your own phone, not a PIN on a potentially compromised vender's device.

The good NFC payment systems are probably slightly more secure than chip and pin systems, and a lot more so than mag stripe ones.

2 days ago
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Why CurrentC Will Beat Out Apple Pay

ceoyoyo Re:Not a chance (627 comments)

Don't the majority of Americans carry credit card debt? That seems like a bigger impediment to debit systems: lots of people just don't have cash on hand to not use a credit card. There must be a reason why the rest of the first world has had essentially universally available, unified debit payment for the last decade or two while the US has only recently gotten a few poorly used systems.

2 days ago
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Why CurrentC Will Beat Out Apple Pay

ceoyoyo Re:if Target can undercut Walmart they will (627 comments)

Except that mom buying the baby formula (holding a baby in one arm) is pissed off at having to unlock her phone, find the app, scan a QR code and have the cashier scan a QR code so she goes somewhere where she can just wave her phone and put her thumb on the home button instead.

Oh, and she's living off credit card debt so she doesn't actually have any money in her checking account to use CurrentC anyway.

2 days ago
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Why CurrentC Will Beat Out Apple Pay

ceoyoyo Re:Not a chance (627 comments)

How do American debit cards work? What's the difference between a debit and ATM card?

If I lose my debit/ATM card, if the PIN was helpfully written on the back, whoever found it could either

a) take the maximum daily withdrawal in cash from the ATM or
b) buy the maximum daily withdrawal worth of stuff from a store.

I don't really see how denying (b) but allowing (a) is better.

2 days ago
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Solving the Mystery of Declining Female CS Enrollment

ceoyoyo Re: Boys are naturally curious... (599 comments)

I'm a medical scientist who has a degree in computer science. Most scientists are absolutely terrible programmers, by the standards of industrial coders. That's part of my point. When I finished my BSc I looked at getting a job as a developer at a contract software company. Sitting in a cubical coding insurance databases or e-commerce sites or whatever for the next forty years didn't really appeal to me. I went into computer science because I loved using a computer as a tool to discover things. So I did a PhD.

I suspect a lot of women make a similar choice. Sit in a dim room writing uninteresting code for applications you don't care about, or use a computer to help do things you do care about?

No, of course I don't know. Did I say I did?

2 days ago
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Solving the Mystery of Declining Female CS Enrollment

ceoyoyo Re: Boys are naturally curious... (599 comments)

There's more to life than employment, and it's those other things that women generally seem to value more, or better recognize the value of, than men. Job satisfaction and security, flexibility, freedom from stress, regular hours, a balanced life.

2 days ago
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Solving the Mystery of Declining Female CS Enrollment

ceoyoyo Re: Boys are naturally curious... (599 comments)

The problem is when people confuse group averages with universal, individually applicable facts. Women choose CS programs less often than men do. That could be because something in females makes them less attracted to CS, or something in typical female upbringing does. A followup question is whether it's a good thing or a bad thing. The author argues that women who avoid CS are actually making a good career decision. Either way, it doesn't say anything about the abilities or interests of any particular person.

2 days ago
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Solving the Mystery of Declining Female CS Enrollment

ceoyoyo Re: Boys are naturally curious... (599 comments)

It may or may not be true that women don't go into CS because of social factors, but you're making another assumption, one that is the primary focus of the article. Does CS lead to "lucrative, high-benefit career paths?" The author argues, with some quantitative evidence to support him, that female enrolment in CS follows economic factors. Programming jobs do tend to be short on job security and long on pressure, overtime and stress. There seems to be a lot of pressure to push women into "lucrative" careers. Perhaps we should take a closer look at the choices they're making and think about pushing men into healthier careers instead.

Perhaps CS became less attractive to women in the 80s when it transitioned from being a mathematical science to a programming degree with attendant crappy career lifestyle. My workplace is full of women who code, more than men, but to support their primary interest: neuroscience.

2 days ago
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Rite Aid and CVS Block Apple Pay and Google Wallet

ceoyoyo Re:Good luck with that. (553 comments)

Once you fill their car with gas, it's a debt: you've given them something and are now demanding payment. As you noticed, if you state ahead of time (or make them pay in advance) there's no debt.

3 days ago
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Computer Scientist Parachutes From 135,908 Feet, Breaking Record

ceoyoyo Re:That's how we CS people roll (175 comments)

He said depending, so there are more terms (and more brackets) that he's not telling you about.

5 days ago
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Decades-old Scientific Paper May Hold Clues To Dark Matter

ceoyoyo Re:Confirming the Brady-Curran model (93 comments)

"Granted, science technically treats negative results as equally important to positive ones"

No it doesn't. This case is a good example. If they had detected something they could have said "dark photons exist and have such and such properties." Instead, all they can say is "dark photons that have such and such properties do not appear to exist if such and such a theory is correct."

It's very important, and generally more difficult than a positive discovery, but negative evidence is always heavily qualified compared to positive.

5 days ago
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Decades-old Scientific Paper May Hold Clues To Dark Matter

ceoyoyo Re:"The data come from" (93 comments)

Data, as in the stuff that comes through your Internet connection, maybe. That is not the case here - this is scientific data, which is a set of individual measurements, very countable and not archaic at all.

But yes, "data" has essentially transitioned from being the plural of "datum" to being an abbreviation of "data set."

5 days ago
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Will the Google Car Turn Out To Be the Apple Newton of Automobiles?

ceoyoyo Re:How hard is it to recognize a stoplight? (287 comments)

An aircraft autopilot doesn't have to "know the answers to thousands of physics calculations." Aircraft autopilots aren't aircraft simulators. They're made as simple as possible so that they can be as reliable as possible. They don't simulate air flow over the wings to figure out what the stall speed of the wing is, somebody programs that number in:

stallSpeedFlaps15 = 70

That's not "knowing physics." And no, you're not "entering a lot of precise mathematical formulas." You program in some safety limits, and a set of rules to accomplish what you want (if speed = stallSpeed then throttle++). The rules are determined using complicated fluid dynamics simulations and flight testing, but none of that is programmed into the autopilot.

The two are different engineering problems, but you can certainly compare them. Aircraft autopilots perform relatively simple tasks that can be directly programmed using a relatively small set of rules. Hobbyists write them for model airplanes to run on microcontrollers. For complicated tasks like landing, they rely on external infrastructure to reduce the task to something that can be solved with simple rules.

Self driving cars could be equally simple, if they drove on highways made for the purpose. The kind Google is working on are much more difficult, involving extremely complicated rules that are too complex to program directly and so the cars have to use machine learning.

5 days ago
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Will the Google Car Turn Out To Be the Apple Newton of Automobiles?

ceoyoyo Re:How hard is it to recognize a stoplight? (287 comments)

Sure you can. Aircraft autopilots have a fairly simple job that needs to be done superbly reliably. Most of the things you've listed are somewhat hard for a human because he has to remember to think about them, like balancing fuel. It's easy to program a computer to always make sure fuel is balanced. So easy, you don't actually need a computer for it. An aircraft autopilot doesn't "need to know physics." It needs to know that with the flaps at 15 degrees the minimum speed is X. Again, that's so simple that aircraft used to implement stall warnings with very simple electronics. Some may have even done it purely mechanically. For the hard part of piloting an aircraft, landing, the autopilot requires external help from instrument landing systems. The big challenge is making sure the human programmers don't screw up while writing the relatively simple code.

You can make a self driving car just as easily if you design the road to go with it. But if you want a self driving car that drives on regular roads you have to do computer vision, which is a lot harder.

about a week ago
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Will the Google Car Turn Out To Be the Apple Newton of Automobiles?

ceoyoyo Re:How hard is it to recognize a stoplight? (287 comments)

Betting on unbounded exponential growth is generally not a good idea. Those "computers" you're talking about cost billions, occupy warehouses, and are actually clusters of multiple computers. Clustering doesn't usually follow Moore's law unless the individual processors are doing so.

Processor development is not currently obeying Moore's law (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-tcoUrJ8CNPk/UsVfZlcA4TI/AAAAAAAAKpk/PdOMedHinN4/s1600/chip2.png). It might be just a matter of waiting for new technology, as has happened in the past, or it might be something more fundamental. We are nearing some fairly hard physical boundaries. There are very different ways of building computers that might get us back on track, but it's not a sure thing.

about a week ago
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NASA's HI-SEAS Project Results Suggests a Women-Only Mars Crew

ceoyoyo Re:Women prefer male bosses (399 comments)

I'm not the AC that replied to you. I'm really not a fan of your discussion style so I wasn't going to reply, but I'm also not a fan of the AC's post and I don't really want to be given credit for it.

You'll note that what I said in my post is that single sex groups, of BOTH persuasions, are probably suboptimal. I DID provide you with a NASA review of quite a few scientific studies that suggest that. I recall a study that looked at long term isolated group cohesiveness that found that all-female groups had some significant long term drawbacks. I don't have time to look it up for your pleasure, so yes, it's an anecdote as far as this discussion is concerned.

There are very real differences between sexes besides the obvious physical ones. The politically correct argument is that they are the result of cultural conditioning. It seems unlikely that all differences are due to the environment, although natural tendencies might be exaggerated that way. The majority of the differences are fairly small, smaller than person to person variability. Trying to evaluate individuals based on subtle group-level differences is a pretty stupid thing to do.

If you read carefully, that report I linked for you reviews several studies that suggest men and women approach problems, and generally work, in slightly different ways, and that those differences tend to complement each other. That agrees with the increases in cohesiveness, productivity and performance that is typically found in mixed versus single sex groups, despite the drawbacks.

about a week ago
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NASA's HI-SEAS Project Results Suggests a Women-Only Mars Crew

ceoyoyo Re:Women prefer male bosses (399 comments)

I don't have it at hand unfortunately, thus the "IIRC". If you find it, please post it so I can write it down though. As a starting point, I'm pretty sure it was posted on Slashdot a few years ago, possibly around the time that astronaut went nuts and road tripped across the US in a diaper to confront another astronaut she had a thing with.

This (http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4411.pdf) report suggests that mixed groups are likely more productive and cohesive than all-male groups. It doesn't mention all female groups though.

about two weeks ago
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NASA's HI-SEAS Project Results Suggests a Women-Only Mars Crew

ceoyoyo Re:Food is not the limiting factor (399 comments)

I'd worry about the unfinished sentence, lack of punctuation and random capitalization before ambiguities that are quite adequately resolved by context.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Martian Volcanoes May Not Be Extinct

ceoyoyo ceoyoyo writes  |  about 7 years ago

ceoyoyo writes "The Tharsis volcanoes on Mars show evidence they may have erupted within the last two million years and may still be dormant, not extinct. The three volcanoes also show evidence of erupting in a chain, much like the Hawaiian islands, with the southernmost showing the oldest lava flows and the northernmost the youngest. On Earth chains of volcanoes are produced when the crust moves over a magma plume in the mantle. On Mars, since there is no tectonic activity, the researchers theorized that the magma plumes themselves move under the fixed crust."
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