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Comments

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AT&T Proposes Net Neutrality Compromise

chubs Sorry, no. (235 comments)

I take my cues from the two major U.S. political parties. There will be no compromises. Better for America to go down in flame than for my rivals to gain any sort of victory

2 days ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

chubs Re:I am shocked! (132 comments)

There are plenty of people in the world who will maintain your vehicle for a reasonable price. Same with your computers.

Yes, and so long as you either 1) don't rely on your vehicle or 2) always schedule your vehicle's problems for times and locations where such a person is available, then relying on them is great. However, if you are driving on a freeway and have your car overheat in an area where there is no cellular coverage (I know there are a lot of urban dwellers here who will never visit a place without cell coverage, but I live in a more rural area where it's spotty at best), and you can't even locate the radiator cap, much less figure out how to add fluid, then you are SOL. Everyone should know how to do basic troubleshooting on anything that they rely on. If an item breaking down is just a minor inconvenience, then it's fine to rely on 9-5 service centers. However, if the item breaking down will seriously disrupt your life or business, then assuming it'll always just work when you need it and giving it no further thought is just reckless.

5 days ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

chubs Re:I am shocked! (132 comments)

If you think regular checkups removes your responsibility to have a fundamental understanding of how eating a bunch of hydrogenated fat, binge drinking, smoking or simply having a sedentary lifestyle will affect your body, then feel free to die at 45.

5 days ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

chubs Re:Linux, cryptography, HTML and JavaScript. (132 comments)

But the course is titled "an introduction to computer science". Why then does the curriculum of the course not introduce the students to any topics in computer science (except, of course, cryptography). We're not saying an introductory course should go in-depth about any topic in computer science, but it should introduce the field.

If I were a freshman and unsure if I should go into CS or CIT, I would want to take an introductory course for each and have them be sufficiently different for me to make an educated decision on which I would prefer.

5 days ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

chubs Re:I am shocked! (132 comments)

Not sure why that should be an apparent problem or concern. I fly frequently - yet I couldn't build or pilot a plane. I routinely benefit from medical care - yet I couldn't perform heart surgery. I drive a car nearly every day - yet I couldn't build or repair one myself.

Contrary to popular Slashdot-aspie opinion, understanding the deep internals of computers is not a requirement for daily life. A small degree of computer literacy is useful in most professional fields, but it is by no means a universal requirement or even universally worthwhile as a pursuit.

I don't need to know how to design a processor to browse the web, type a research paper, or play Angry Birds.

The parent doesn't claim everyone should know how to repair, design, or build their computing device, merely have a general grasp of how it's doing what it's doing. You do not own a plane. You probably don't need to worry about that. If you own a car, then yes, You really ought to know enough about how it works to perform routine maintenance (oil changes, etc). And if you don't have a general understanding of how your body works, there's probably a reason you have to go benefit from medical care so routinely (an apple a day keeps the doctor away, etc).

5 days ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

chubs Re:Computers and Computer Science (132 comments)

No. Meaning every good astronomer can use a telescope, but not everyone that can use a telescope is an astronomer. You really should know how to program to do computer science, but programming computers is not computer science.

5 days ago
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UK Ham Radio Reg Plans To Drop 15 min Callsign Interval and Allow Encryption

chubs This sounds really good, but it isn't (104 comments)

Allowing encryption on the ham bands sounds like a great idea, especially to slashdotters, because we all really love the idea of our government not being able to listen to everything we say. Unfortunately, there are a lot of governments who really don't like that idea. The only reason Ham operators in your favorite semi-free country of choice can talk to people in much less free parts of the world is because of the ban on encryption. If the UK allows encrypted signals over ham, and a UK ham operator can get signals hitting all over the world, you better believe the Iranian, Chinese, and all other heavy-handed governments that make no effort to hide their censorship efforts will start rounding up ham equipment because who knows what sort of ideas are streaming in from the UK.
Global encryption bans are the only thing allowing ham to operate in large portions of the country. All it takes is one country lifting that ban to spoil it for everyone. There are plenty of other avenues for those who want to encrypt their communications.

about a week ago
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UN Study Shows Record-High Increases For Atmospheric CO2 In 2013

chubs Re:I love this debate (427 comments)

You misread that. I wasn't claiming the existence of dinosaurs was a debate. I was referring to those who embrace the Standard Model of physics as dinosaurs (an example of useless name calling).

about a week ago
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Unpopular Programming Languages That Are Still Lucrative

chubs Devote your time to logic (385 comments)

It's better to devote your time to improving your logic, design and architecture skills. If your career is tied to the continued usefulness of a given language, you're almost guaranteed to eventually find yourself unemployed or forever locked into a maintenance job that doesn't allow you to create anything new or interesting. Hardly what I'd call a "great job", which you seem to believe you must paint yourself into a corner to obtain.
Stop focusing on being a coder and start focusing on being a software developer. Learn about algorithm analysis and optimization. Learn about design patterns. Learn about software architecture. Apply those to whatever language the "great job" employer wants you to use.

about a week ago
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UN Study Shows Record-High Increases For Atmospheric CO2 In 2013

chubs I love this debate (427 comments)

I love the global warming debate. You are either an environmentalist nut-job or an anti-science global warming denier. We spend almost no time analyzing reports, comparing data and questioning our preconceived notions (a.k.a. rational thought), and instead dig around the internet for articles supporting our side of the argument and name-calling anyone who has any doubts about the methods or conclusions from our pet article.
In any other scientific debate, you never hear about "Higgs Boson Deniers" or "String Theory Fanatics" or "Standard Model dinosaurs". As a matter of fact, this is pretty much the only scientific area where EVERY commentator acts as though they are experts. Whenever I see a /. article where global warming is the subject, I can rest assured that at least 95% of the comments will either be by or in response to trolls. It's like I'm on reddit or something.

about two weeks ago
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California Blue Whales Rebound From Whaling

chubs Re:Dreadnoughtus schrani now the largest known din (91 comments)

Yes, it's the largest creature to ever walk on land, but that's only because no whale has ever walked on land.

Disclaimer: I have not done any research to substantiate this claim, and I realize it's impossible to prove a negative, but I'm fairly certain there are no documented cases of walking whales.

Unless, of course, you count the Vancouver Canucks mascott

about two weeks ago
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California Blue Whales Rebound From Whaling

chubs Re:Dreadnoughtus schrani now the largest known din (91 comments)

Yes, it's the largest creature to ever walk on land, but that's only because no whale has ever walked on land.

Disclaimer: I have not done any research to substantiate this claim, and I realize it's impossible to prove a negative, but I'm fairly certain there are no documented cases of walking whales.

about two weeks ago
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California Blue Whales Rebound From Whaling

chubs Re:Dreadnoughtus schrani now the largest known din (91 comments)

As has already been pointed, out, 190 tons > 65 tons. The author of the summary could well have done his research today, and said "wow. This new article claims that the Dreadnoughtus schrani is roughly 65 tons. If only it had been 2 tons lighter, I could have claimed the blue whale to be 3 times the size of the largest dinosaur, rather than just "more than twice much".
Yes, it's the largest creature to ever walk on land, but that's only because no whale has ever walked on land.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Are the Strangest Features of Various Programming Languages?

chubs Pascal boolean operators (729 comments)

FreePascal: logical and bitwise 'and' and 'or' are the same operator, it just chooses one for you based on the operands. Example: "if (i < 5 and j < 10)". The compiler tries to do a bitwise and of 5 and J, then compare it to i, and then it gets confused about how that result (a boolean) can be less than 10

about two weeks ago
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Ask David Saltzberg About Being The Big Bang Theory's Science Advisor

chubs Re:It's about the sex (226 comments)

Speaking of which do the writers have any background in science, or do they just call in the science adviser every now and then to double check things?

A quick wikipedia search indicates that both the creators are TV people to the core, with no involvement in science. Chuck Lorre spent 2 years in college where he "majored in rock 'n' roll and pot and minored in LSD", but has no other academic credentials. Bill Prary's page does at least suggest he did some work on Star Trek: Voyager, but that's the only connection he has to the show's sci-fi loving characters.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B...

about two weeks ago
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Ask David Saltzberg About Being The Big Bang Theory's Science Advisor

chubs Pardon my grammer (226 comments)

Pardon my grammer. I realize "every Americans" is incorrect and quite ironic in its placement in a sentence about the intelligence of average Americans.

about two weeks ago
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Ask David Saltzberg About Being The Big Bang Theory's Science Advisor

chubs Do all geeks hate the show? (226 comments)

A lot of the comments/questions I've read so far are from geeks who seem to feel that BBT perpetuates stereotypes about geeks and does more harm than good to the geek community. Outside of slashdot, do you typically get this kind of response (where non-geeks think it's funny and geeks think it's somehow offensive)? For the record, I consider myself to be a geek and I really enjoy BBT, though, as mentioned elsewhere, the humor is not nearly as intelligent as the show's characters are supposed to be. That's fine, though. Every once in a while it's fun to pick up a show where every average intelligence (and most sub-par intelligence) Americans will get every joke.

about two weeks ago
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Could Tech Have Stopped ISIS From Using Our Own Heavy Weapons Against Us?

chubs There is a kill switch (448 comments)

There is a kill switch for military equipment. It's called drones.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Ask Slashdot: What is the best country to live in?

chubs chubs writes  |  3 days ago

chubs (2470996) writes "I keep seeing news articles about the myriad ways the U.S government is trampling on peoples rights and privacy. I see similar stories about other countries as well. Stories of spying, censorship, intimidation and violations of basic human rights seem to be all over the world. Therefore, my question is this: if I were to want to live in a developed country that actually respects its citizens' rights, where would I go? Let's assume there are some basic criteria I would want a candidate to meet. First, they don't spy on their own citizens without suspecting them of committing a crime. Second, they allow free speech, from the right to publicly disagree with government actions down to the right to post a negative review about a restaurant. Third, government officials are elected and there is a fair degree of confidence that this is done by the people and not just paid for by the donors with the deepest pockets."

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