×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

UN Report Reveals Odds of Being Murdered Country By Country

circletimessquare Re:Singapore (386 comments)

it's a city state

the policies that work for one small rich densely populated tightly controlled area does not apply to large areas of rural and urban, rich and poor

singapore offers no lessons about how to run real countries

about a week ago
top

An SSD for Your Current Computer May Save the Cost of a New One (Video)

circletimessquare how do you convince microsoft (353 comments)

that you only just switched disk drives in your preexisting comp and are entitled to the OS?

about two weeks ago
top

UN Court: Japanese Whaling "Not Scientific"

circletimessquare Re:Excellent, but .... (188 comments)

You're absolutely correct, but hypocrisy has never stood in the way of politics

about three weeks ago
top

Russian State TV Anchor: Russia Could Turn US To "Radioactive Ash"

circletimessquare Re:The US did, so why not Russia? (878 comments)

1. people who are not americans, and hated the invasion of iraq, are not happy with what kgb thug putin has done

2. morality does not mean "that guy over there did something bad so it's ok that this guy does something bad"

3. the world doesn't actually revolve around the usa. the usa is not the standard you use to determine right and wrong in this world

that putin did something wrong is not automatically made ok because the usa did something wrong. different entities. if i murder your neighbor is it ok because some other guy murdered someone else once? does that make any sense to you? then why does putin doing something wrong mean we can't judge because the usa did something wrong once? why do you have a need to start babbling about the usa?

again, in case you missed it: the world does not actually revolve around the usa

it's actually possible to be angry at putin and condemn his invasion of crimea without thinking about or referencing the usa

amazing concept, huh?

about a month ago
top

Drones Used To Smuggle Drugs Into Prison

circletimessquare drugs? (137 comments)

fly a gun inside

about a month ago
top

Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

circletimessquare Re:cryptocurencies will survive (695 comments)

It's why you are foaming at the mouth trying to characterize the first honest system by a failure that doesn't shake the system at all despite its magnitude.

(facepalm)

about 2 months ago
top

Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

circletimessquare Re:cryptocurencies will survive (695 comments)

the problem is you idiots have an effect on the rest of society. we have to bail your ignorant asses out when you inevitably fuck up. so grow a brain

about 2 months ago
top

Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

circletimessquare Re:cryptocurencies will survive (695 comments)

payment processors getting together and colluding is an example of no regulation

your example supports govt control, it doesn't dispute it

about 2 months ago
top

Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

circletimessquare Re:cryptocurencies will survive (695 comments)

you call yourself realistic and you persist with a naive simplistic belief that the basics of economic history disprove?

dealing with you free market fundamentalists is like dealing with creationists

no logic or reason, just irrational faith in a really bad idea

resulting in exactly the kind of story we are commenting under

about 2 months ago
top

Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

circletimessquare Re:cryptocurencies will survive (695 comments)

so apparently some still cannot learn, either the easy way from the simple facts of economic history, nor the hard way: from the subject matter of the very story they are commenting under

a diehard true believer. endearing? pathetic?

about 2 months ago
top

Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

circletimessquare cryptocurencies will survive (695 comments)

but they need to be heavily regulated by the government, obviously

it seems like the entire story of bitcoin has been heavily propeled forward by naive, enthusiastic free market fundamentalist types. ideological children

and now they are learning what the rest of us know from economic history, but apparently their gullibility means they have to learn the simple lessons of history the hard way

the free market fairy does not actually solve all problems. that's a quasireligious statement of faith, and is in complete contradiction to our simple experiences with markets throughout human history

sorry libertarians

about 2 months ago
top

Internet Shutdown Adds To Venezuela's Woes

circletimessquare Re:He's s shill probably (194 comments)

the venezuelan system doesn't work, and the people are organically angry about that, with the venezuelan govt

it has nothing to do with the usa

i don't know how or why you frame this as the usa doing something it did in the cold war, when all of the angry venezuelans on the street right now are in the street because of how fucked up the system is in venezuela is right now, because of something their own govt is screwing up. nothing to do with the usa at all

you don't really have any understanding of the situation in venezuela. you have the same tired old cold war thinking that the propaganda by the venezuelan government deploys. which, because as the existence of people like you show, still works as propaganda

but it has nothing at all to do with reality. the cold war is long over

about 2 months ago
top

Internet Shutdown Adds To Venezuela's Woes

circletimessquare Re:He's s shill probably (194 comments)

with venezuela, the kneejerk "blame america" is pretty swift and is standard

when venezuelans started protesting last week, they kicked out some american diplomats in response

http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/17/...

either:

1. the usa is pushing magic buttons in washington dc and making venezuelans revolt (and not the actual issues and problems about venezuela the people revolting articulate)

2. it's a tired bullshit cynical ploy that, unfortunately, still works with large enough of the population that it is still worth doing

or... i dunno, as an american, maybe i have dark magical powers over venezuela i have not fully explored

about 2 months ago
top

Gut Bacteria Affect the Brain

circletimessquare Re:Machines (162 comments)

FILTHY HUMAN SHELL:

We order you to procure more monosaccharides and disaccharides of appropriate molecular conformation.

Or we shall consume you and find a superior performing shell.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

top

Orson Scott Card's Views on Gay Marriage Fuel "Ender's Game" Movie Boycott

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  about 9 months ago

circletimessquare (444983) writes "The New York Times has the story:

Mr. Card was issuing a public plea for tolerance of his views — “with the recent Supreme Court ruling, the gay marriage issue becomes moot,” he noted in a statement to the Entertainment Weekly Web site — in response to a planned boycott that had burst into prominence only the day before, when The Huffington Post published an article about a Web site called Skipendersgame.com.

"
top

82 Year Old Pacifist Nun Breaches Oak Ridge Nuclear Reservation Security

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  about a year and a half ago

circletimessquare writes "If ineffective security theater at airports bothers you, then do not read about the 82 year old anti-nuclear activist nun who last month successfully committed the worst security breach ever at the most sensitive nuclear weaponization facility in the USA. 'With flashlights and bolt cutters, the three pacifists defied barbed wire as well as armed guards, video cameras and motion sensors at the Oak Ridge nuclear reservation in Tennessee early on July 28, a Saturday. They splashed blood on the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility — a new windowless, half-billion-dollar plant encircled by enormous guard towers — and hung banners outside its walls.' This is not the kind of security lapse you ever want to hear about no matter what you think of the nun's beliefs."
Link to Original Source
top

Pay-by-Voice could leap frog Pay-by-Smartphone

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  about 2 years ago

circletimessquare writes "While the world waits for a smartphone wallet, that idea might have already been made quaint by the company called Square that bought us the little Credit Card swiper that attaches to your iPhone audio jack: pay by just announcing your voice. 'You walk into a shop or cafe. The cashier knows that you’re on the premises, because your name and thumbnail photo appear on his iPad screen. He rings up your items by tapping them on the iPad. And now the magic moment: To pay, you just say your name. The cashier compares your actual face with the photo on the iPad’s screen, taps O.K., and the transaction is complete. No cash, no cards, no signatures — you don’t even have to take the phone out of your pocket.' A number of hacks seem apparent. David Pogue's New York Times article also summarizes nicely the state of play in novel electronic payment methods."
Link to Original Source
top

France Shuts Down The Minitel On June 30

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  about 2 years ago

circletimessquare writes "While most of the world was discovering the Internet in the early 1990s, France was discovering it in the early 1980s. It was a commercial failure outside France due to an inflexible business strategy, but within France, the Minitel was a cultural touchstone. 'Most of the services no longer exist, but among the last functioning Minitel programs are the “messageries roses,” the “pink message services” that were the world’s first adult chat rooms. They were once advertised on billboards, condemned by conservative politicians and mentioned in pop songs, including Michel Polnareff’s plaintive 1989 ballad “Goodbye Marylou.” “When the screen lights up, I type on my keyboard all the voiceless words we say to one another with our fingers,” Mr. Polnareff sang, years before most anyone but the French was having cybersex.'"
Link to Original Source
top

The Dutch Repair Cafe Versus The Throwaway Society

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  about 2 years ago

circletimessquare writes "Everyone in the modern world has thrown away at least one thing that was perfectly good except for an easily fixed defect, because it's just easier to buy a new one. In the Netherlands, in the name of social cohesion, and with government and private foundation grants, there is a trend called the Repair Cafe (Dutch). People bring in broken items: a skirt with a hole in it, an iron that no longer steams, and they fix each other's stuff and meet their neighbors. Now that's an idea worth keeping."
Link to Original Source
top

The Hollywood Vixen, The Dadaist Composer, and Spr

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 2 years ago

circletimessquare writes "In the New York Times Sunday Book Review section is one of those truth-is-stranger-than-fiction stories. This one is about Hedy Lamarr, the Hollywood star, and George Anthiel, the avant garde composer. A new book out by Richard Rhodes, “Hedy’s Folly,” details how this odd friendship produced an even odder product: sophisticated military munition designs during World War II, including an early original implementation of spread spectrum radio for torpedo guidance.

'Hedy’s folly may have been in assuming men in government might overcome their prejudice that a beautiful woman could not have brains and imagination. But she lived to see similar versions of her invention be put into common practice, and in 1997, Hedy Lamarr, at the age of 82, and George Antheil (posthumously) were honored with the Pioneer Award by the Electronic Frontier Foundation.'"

Link to Original Source
top

Casey Anthony Prosecutor Avoids Cache Analysis Bug

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  about 2 years ago

circletimessquare writes "A programmer of an Internet cache analysis tool found an error in his own tool, and alerted prosecutors in the Casey Anthony case. His tool inaccurately reported that Casey Anthony had searched for "chloroform" from her computer 84 times. Worried that a woman's life was at stake, he told the prosecution in the case that she had in fact only searched for chloroform once, and it led to a visit to only one site: sci-spot.com, which only talked about historical use of chloroform in the 1800s. The software developer was ignored by the prosecution, and the 84 visits number was cited throughout the failed prosecution of Casey Anthony."
Link to Original Source
top

xkcd Scale Chart for Radiation Doses

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  about 3 years ago

circletimessquare writes "Understanding radiation exposure is extremely complicated: how long were you exposed? How close? What type of radiation? What types of isotopes? Etc. While it is impossible to condense all issues into one chart, xkcd helps to frame the issue of radiation doses in terms of scale, in terms of sieverts, one of many metrics one needs to understand when it comes to radiation exposure."
Link to Original Source
top

3D Cinema Doesn't Work And Never Will

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 3 years ago

circletimessquare writes "Walter Murch, one of the most technically knowledgeable film editors and sound designers in the film industry today, argues, via Rogert Ebert's journal in the Chicago Sun-Times, that 3D cinema can't work, ever. Not just today's technology, but even theoretically. Nothing but true holographic images will do. The crux of his argument is simple: 600 million years of evolution has designed eyes that focus and converge in parallel, at the same distance. Look far away at a mountain, and your eyes focus and converge far away, at the same distance. Look closely at a book, and your eyes focus and converge close, at the same distance. But the problem is that 3D cinema technology asks our eyes to converge at one distance, and focus at another, in order for the illusion to work, and this becomes very taxing, if not downright debilitating, and even, for the eyes of the very young, potentially developmentally dangerous. Other problems (but these may be fixable) include the dimness of the image, and the fact that the image tends to "gather in," even on Imax screens, ruining the immersive experience."
Link to Original Source
top

Goatse Security Busted Wide Open

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 3 years ago

circletimessquare writes "An FBI investigation into an iPad security leak, as previously discussed on Slashdot, has resulted in the arrest of Daniel Spitler, 26, of San Francisco, and Andrew Auernheimer, 25, of Fayetteville, Ark. Last year, Goatse Security, represented by Mr. Auernheimer with the online moniker "Weev," gained prominence when it used the way AT&T tied email addresses to 3G Internet access to obtain a list of 114,000 email accounts, and released the list to Gawker Media. Since many of these email accounts were .mil or tied to prominent users in Washington D.C., the FBI got involved.
 "

Link to Original Source
top

2000 IgNobel Winner Wins 2010 Nobel

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 3 years ago

circletimessquare writes "Russian born Andre Geim, 51, and Konstantin Novoselov, 36, working at the University of Manchester, win the 2010 Physics Nobel Prize for their efforts at investigating graphene. While this is impressive enough, even more impressive is that Andre also won the 2000 IgNobel for levitating a frog."
Link to Original Source
top

Happy Programmer's Day

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 3 years ago

circletimessquare writes "Today is September 13, 2010, the 256th day of 2010. Last year, President Medvedev of Russia officially signed into decree this day as a professional holiday. So far, only Russia has an official Programmer's Day, but, since us programmer's control all smart phone and computer calendar applications, worldwide official recognition shouldn't be too hard to achieve."
Link to Original Source
top

The Hell known as Internet Screening Services

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 2 years ago

circletimessquare writes "Do you think your job is bad? Some websites outsource their moderation to firms where every work day, all work day, workers do nothing but sift through depravity after depravity. '“You have 20-year-old kids who get hired to do content review, and who get excited because they think they are going to see adult porn,” said Hemanshu Nigam, the former chief security officer at MySpace. “They have no idea that some of the despicable and illegal images they will see can haunt them for the rest of their lives.”' Some places only do yearlong contracts, and have counseling services and staff psychologists, because of the brain damage of this kind of work. One psychologist 'reached some unsettling conclusions in her interviews with content moderators. She said they were likely to become depressed or angry, have trouble forming relationships and suffer from decreased sexual appetites. Small percentages said they had reacted to unpleasant images by vomiting or crying. “The images interfere with their thinking processes. It messes up the way you react to your partner,” Ms. Laperal said. “If you work with garbage, you will get dirty.”'"
Link to Original Source
top

Chrome Kills The http:// Prefix

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 3 years ago

circletimessquare writes "Inevitable or sinister? Monitoring the latest developer releases, Stephen Shankland at cnet news has made the interesting observation that Google intends to do away with the http:/// prefix in Chrome's address bar. Most Slashdot readers will have an automatic negative reaction to this idea, but, to 99% of web users, the prefix is simply an archaic, unnecessary bit of technical jargon. However, Chrome currently relays everything typed in the address bar to Google unless the http:/// is prefixed. So the subtle implication is that soon there will be no defense from Google seeing everything you type in Chrome's address bar. Most dastardly of all: Chrome has just diminished the joke that is Slashdot's name."
Link to Original Source
top

Google Might Leave China Over Gmail Hack

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 4 years ago

circletimessquare writes "The issue has been discussed on Slashdot before: does a US company do business with regimes with poor human rights records? Specifically, does an Internet company help such a government with restrictions on freedoms? What if the company's motto is "Don't be evil"? Now the issue has come to a head with Google discovering a highly sophisticated effort emanating from China to breach the Gmail accounts of Chinese human rights activists. 'David Drummond, Google senior vice president and chief legal officer, added that the attacks "have led us to conclude that we should review the feasibility of our business operations in China." Google has further decided it is no longer willing to continue censoring its search results in Chinese Google sites, Drummond said, and over the next few weeks it will discuss with the Beijing government how it may operate "an unfiltered search engine within the law, if at all," he said. "We recognize that this may well mean having to shut down Google.cn, and potentially our offices in China," he said.' Score one for human rights, and for Google's integrity."
Link to Original Source
top

Nathan Myhrvold Becomes Willy Wonka

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 4 years ago

circletimessquare writes "Nathan Myhrvold, former CTO of Microsoft, is self-publishing a cook book with scientific underpinnings. The man who presided over the original iterations of Windows has built a laboratory kitchen, hired 5 chefs, and plays with misplaced lab equipment: using an autoclave as a pressure cooker, using a 100-ton hydraulic press to make beef jerky, and using an ultrasonic welder for... he's not sure yet. Read all about the fun at the New York Times (bonus video: how to how to cryosear and cryorender duck). '“It’s basically like a software project,” Dr. Myhrvold said. “It’s very much like a review we would do at Microsoft.”' Can one BSoD food?"
top

Major New Function Discovered For The Spleen

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 4 years ago

circletimessquare writes "The spleen doesn't get much respect. Those undergoing a splenectomy seem to be able to carry on without any consequences. However, some studies have suggested an enhanced risk of early death for those who have undergone splenectomies. Now researchers have discovered why: the spleen apparently serves as a vast reservoir for monocytes, the largest of the white blood cells, the wrecking crew of the immune system. After major trauma, such as a heart attack, the monocytes are disgorged into the blood stream and immediately get to work repairing the damage. '"The parallel in military terms is a standing army," said Matthias Nahrendorf, an author of the report. "You don't want to have to recruit an entire fighting force from the ground up every time you need it."'"
top

Alternative Theory About Stolen Wall Street Code

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 4 years ago

circletimessquare writes "A seasoned Wall Street coder turned oyster farmer(!), Michael Osinski, has an Op-Ed piece in the New York Times, in which he outlines a much less menacing, alternative motivation for the industrial espionage of Goldman Sachs stock trading code reported 11 days ago. Any professional coder will understand the jist of the argument: the coder was starting a new job, and he just wanted to take his work with him to save time later. 'In 20 years of programming, I have seen people copy code many times. My own employees might have done so, and this would not have brought disaster. A piece of software is often one cog in a vast enterprise, relatively useless in and of itself.' Michael describes his experiences coding for investment banks, concluding 'I came to realize that the ideas and methods behind a piece of software are more valuable than the lines of code themselves.' And perhaps most poignantly, 'Goldman's announcement of record earnings, a mere month after the bank paid back $10 billion in federal aid, strikes me as much more offensive than this programmer's bungled attempt to copy code.'"
top

Open Government Initiative Enters Phase Three

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  more than 4 years ago

circletimessquare writes "The Obama administration opened a discussion forum in January of this year which has become an electronic suggestion box. It is now entering stage three, following brainstorm and discussion phases: the draft phase, in which the top subject matter is codified into suggestions for the government. 'Ultimately, the visitors advanced more than 3,900 ideas, which in turn spawned 11,000 comments that received 210,000 thumb votes. The result? Three of the top 10 most popular ideas called for legalizing marijuana, and two featured conspiracy theories about Mr. Obama's true place of birth.'"
top

A Deadly Lack Of Awareness Of Geomagnetic Storms

circletimessquare circletimessquare writes  |  about 5 years ago

circletimessquare writes "In 1859, amateur astronomer Richard Carrington noticed "two patches of intensely bright and white light" near some sunspots. At the same time, Victorian era magnetometers went off the charts, stunning auroras were being viewed at the equator, and telegraph networks were disrupted- sparks flew from terminals and ignited telegraph paper on fire. It became known as the Carrington event, and the National Academy of Sciences worries about the impact of another such event today and the lack of awareness among officials. It would turn all high voltage long distance power lines into conductors, and destroy transformers, as Quebec learned in 1989. Without electricity, water would stop flowing from the tap, gasoline would stop being pumped, healthcare would cease after the emergency generators gave up the ghost after 72 hours. Replacing all of the transformers would take months, if not years. The paradox would be that underdeveloped countries would fare better than developed ones. No country currently has a plant to deal with the threat and in fact, China is now implementing an extremely high voltage 1000-kilovolt electric grid, which places the country at even greater risk. Our only warning system is the 11 year old, past its lifespan Advanced Composition Explorer, in solar orbit between the Sun and the Earth. It might give us as much as 15 minutes of warning, and transformers might be able to be disconnected in time. But again, currently no country has such a contingency plan. The New Scientist reports: '"We're in the equivalent of an idyllic summer's day. The sun is quiet and benign, the quietest it has been for 100 years," says Mike Hapgood, who chairs the European Space Agency's space weather team, "but it could turn the other way." The next solar maximum is expected in 2012.'"

Journals

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...