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The Dominant Life Form In the Cosmos Is Probably Superintelligent Robots

cloud.pt The chicken or the egg (378 comments)

This is probably based on statistical models, based on our own civilization, that predict genuine AI will be achieved way before we can either communicate with extraterrestrial life, or travel to such life.

So, you see, this is just the same paradox again: however we came to be whatever we are now (usually called the homo sapiens), we have evolved in a synthetic way by itself, and our DNA is the catalyst that promoted our evolution. So, to believe the evolution of animal life, and the appearance of rationality in homo sapiens is but randomness, is the only way to admit we are not synthetic - highly improbable occurrence, unless we happen to be the very first sentient beings in the universe (a very egocentric thought to say the least, except if you take religion as proof). It is much more probable that we have been synthesized ourselves by an entity that hasn't presented itself to us (and is God in one way or another, but that's a philosophical matter).

tl:dr - we are most likely synthetic life forms too, so whoever we find we should not be distinguishing sentience categorization with them. There will be other (more important) divergences in the event of 3rd kind close encounters

2 days ago
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US Links North Korea To Sony Hacking

cloud.pt Re:Between the lines (182 comments)

A joke for a joke heh ^_^. In any case, I doubt there are any black hat (open) courses anywhere across the globe, and even white-hat cyber-security courses won't teach you 1% of what you need for such an attack. They do provide guidelines though.

What you need to succeed in such attacks is: open-minded, out of the box thinking; access to computers; and some very open access to the webs deepest corners. All of this has to be set up in line with the emancipation of IT abilities, which is usually around teenage-hood to its end around 20-24, or else there's no aptitude inception for it to become any useful. All of the above boxes do NOT tick for 99.99% of the NK population (that's like everyone but the top 10 NK government executives, including KJU).

So unless NK government started breeding hackers before Y2K (which most developed countries didn't, and underdeveloped countries were still thinking plutonium enrichment back then), and SHA-2 is no slouch, so this was certainly not a solo-NK attack. This has Beijing written all over.

3 days ago
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US Links North Korea To Sony Hacking

cloud.pt Between the lines (182 comments)

What should be seen from these blaming statements is one of two inevitable conclusions:

  • - either US is trying to set up North Korea's public opinion in order to excuse some new (military or cyber-) incursion to them, or...
  • - they are actually making honest statements, in which case China is surely helping these cyber-attacks. It should be obvious that North Korea doesn't have the IT background necessary for such attacks... Unless Kim Jong-Un took some hardcore CS crash-course back in his Switzerland days.

In any case, Korea is deepening its role of battleground in the economical and social proxy-war between China and the US. This is nothing more than a turn of that chess game, but this time I'm pretty sure I heard "check" from the "red" side...

3 days ago
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Spanish Media Group Wants Gov't Help To Keep Google News In Spain

cloud.pt Re: They brought it upon themselves (191 comments)

Yeap, i thought exactly the same. AEDE is probably asking the government to pretty much make the extortion for them: " hey government, Google there can just walk away, so please do something we can't, like fining or restricting their non-news related services if they don't buy our news. Because, well the law we lobbied for you to pass for us was not enough to force Google to give us profit we didn't deserve in the first place. And that were probably not gonna get because Google is paying for those fines rather than paying us for news, but we still want them to burn for giving us traffic..."

about a week ago
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"Lax" Crossdomain Policy Puts Yahoo Mail At Risk

cloud.pt Est.1998 (49 comments)

This is why my Yahoo account is my "disposable account" creation SH*TBOX . Way back since 1998

about two weeks ago
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Apple Pay Competitor CurrentC Breached

cloud.pt The real question is... (265 comments)

...do we get to see Jennifer Lawrence's "account balance"?

about 2 months ago
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It's Official: HTML5 Is a W3C Standard

cloud.pt Re:Well, that's cool I guess (125 comments)

Your'e not giving enough credit to the organization that enabled you to write comments that look this c o o l

about 2 months ago
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Alienware's Triangular Area-51 Re-Design With Tri-SLI GeForce GTX 980, Tested

cloud.pt Re:Odd thermal dynamics (138 comments)

Oh, nevermind, it actually makes sense because the top fans are supposed to heat the fluid circuit, which renders my point of air traveling throughout the case moot.

about 2 months ago
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Alienware's Triangular Area-51 Re-Design With Tri-SLI GeForce GTX 980, Tested

cloud.pt Re:Is this a post or an ad? (138 comments)

This is Slashsdot mate, not PhD Comics. Gaming is also geeky, and if you don't know and/or crave Alienware, I have good (bad) news for you... You need to get out of the lab more often :D

about 2 months ago
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Alienware's Triangular Area-51 Re-Design With Tri-SLI GeForce GTX 980, Tested

cloud.pt Odd thermal dynamics (138 comments)

Despite the hype they make about the unencumbered airflow front and back, I seriously have my doubts on a system that has a pump-in fan so close to a pump-out fan.

I mean, look at the top triangle tip.

In their defense, there are 2 extra fans below, but some fluid dynamics graph would be nice for prooving good thermals exist there.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Can't Google Block Spam In Gmail?

cloud.pt It's a paradox (265 comments)

I personally like the idea of learning algorithms, through Mark as Spam or Add to Contacts. But as a sysop in a somewhat busy, mid-scale company MX, I find 2 big user-preference deterrents to its use:

  • 1. wide email client preference, and thus flawed learning due to inconsistent behavior of Mark as Spam and Add to Contacts
  • 2. user-specific enforcing of spam-to-inbox - older peers, usually managers, just prefer to get everything and filter manually, as they are allergic to new paradigms such as webmail (which interact well with learning algorithms, e.g. roundcube), and just panic to the possibility of getting an important mail not getting to their Outlook Inbox

My most used technique involves configuring amavis (spamassassin, amavis, etc) just like OP does, but then, and since I use ISPConfig with a plethora of configurable per-user Spam policies, I just tell everyone responsible for creating mailboxes to arbitrate between them, ad hoc. It works somewhat well: every month or so I get an unhappy camper, and I just accept the fact it happens.

about 2 months ago
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Conservative Groups Accuse FCC of Helping Net Neutrality Advocates File Comments

cloud.pt Re:814.000 signatures... (283 comments)

I can really see some sense in your un-numbered paragraphs, because that's politics 101.

Except maybe here:

What it won't accomplish is giving you more freedom

You can use whatever rhetoric you want. You can tell me there are endless loopholes that net neutrality sponsors can abuse. But unless the dictionary has changed, neutrality still relates to the disregard for censorship. Whoever says the contrary is, indeed, applying smokescreens to the concept.

Now, about your numbered topics: you keep talking money. I don't care about money. I know this is all about money and Netflix and yada yada. I DON'T CARE. As long as I'm not using my internet for something that is morally wrong, I am using my internet like it was (or at least should) meant to.

Some Definitions:
Morally Wrong - Pirating Copyrighted material; Getting illegal content such as child pornography; Hacking secure systems for illicit reasons.
Not Morally Wrong - Paying and downloading copyrighted content; downloading 08FU5C473D content (because you can't prove what it is); Hacking secure systems for proof of concept and recreational purposes.

Some opinions:
(1) It is the ISP's responsibility to get me the throughput I pay for without discrimination. If contracts allow discrimination the ISP is taking on someone else's responsability (read 3);
(2) It is the content provider's responsibility to have content in legal form and to protect it in an acceptable fashion;
(3) It is the governing regulatory bodies responsibility to scourge the content providers for bad content (and this includes bad content distribution form, such as, say, Netflix flooding the gates of the Internet to a point they are messing with a utility).

about 2 months ago
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Conservative Groups Accuse FCC of Helping Net Neutrality Advocates File Comments

cloud.pt 814.000 signatures... (283 comments)

Are we really supposed to believe 814.000 Americans signed a petition to prevent them from using their internet as they see fit? Never mind the fact the triplicated the single signature purpose, this is flat out unbelievable.

about 3 months ago
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Apple Faces Large Penalties In EU Tax Probe

cloud.pt I sense bias here... (120 comments)

it seems that the Irish government would actually get the extra money and suffer little for its part in the scheme

So, if the government was the victim because some of its members decided to abuse power in order to get personal compensation (be it money or just public opinion), why would the government itself be penalized? It's true that the government is made by elected members of the people in a democracy, but these people did NOT represent the government's best interests with the deal, as the deal did not do justice to the government by breaking its law.

It might even have benefited the country overall, with new money getting in through other revenue from Apple keeping business there, but that is just a political illusion of benefit to the government - it is more of a treat to the elected political party, who managed to gain popularity to the eyes of the community by committing public taxes for it.

Deals like this can be done, as long as they are made under the guise of a solid investment and they do not break any trade policies without lawmakers consent, which does not appear to be the case.

about 3 months ago
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

cloud.pt Re:Make money out of them (418 comments)

I see your point, but 99% of the services anyone uses online instantiate a form of server. Any P2P network, such as torrents or TOR, can be considered setting up a server. If that is basis for establishing that the user is running a server, they could very well shut down their entire user base. Nowadays, even a very basic browser page can be considered a server, the page just needs an open socket for incoming connections. Anyone else creating an online multiplayer private match (thinking of counter-strike, UT, Age of Empires, among thousands of others) can also be incriminated for "providing internet services" if you follow that logic.

Comcast gets to determine whether your activities can be deemed unlawful.

Now, this is a concept that even here in Europe we have to condone contractually, yet nobody abides to legally. If a com company is known to be doing something fishy like terminating contracts out of their own free-will, companies here get the hammer, be it from a lawsuit or from being dropped by their market. That's why you don't see any company doing it, even there in the US. Do you know of anyone having their service suspended out of the company not liking their usage patterns (and that don't go to jail)? All I hear is people getting their band throttled, but this happens on a mass scale and not to a singled out individual.

A company cannot just speculate, because that would be considered an abuse of power. The state can do that though, and that is why we have "piracy taxes" for hard disk drives and now even for flash-based built-in memory on our cells and tablets (yeah, we just got it approved in Portugal last month)... The state can say that if there is "massive, yet unidentifiable known use of copyrighted material", it can establish a generalized tax that applies even for people that do not infringe the copyright. It is even applied twice or three times for people that purchase digital/physical content. Companies can't do such type of generalization or speculation.

about 3 months ago
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

cloud.pt Make money out of them (418 comments)

To whomever is getting calls like these, take the chance to install a call recorder. Ask for the operator name, and for a reference that proves the operator is really a Comcast representative such as "can you tell me my current service/plan?".

After all this, let them know you will continue using TOR, and sue them for breach of contract and intimidation if they go forth with their mischievous threats. You are allowed to use your internet connection according to their TOS, which does not bar TOR unless the FCC really let that slide. If Comcast themselves are trying to enforce the law-enforcement right to spy on you as approved by congress, they are infringing the law by abusing a right not theirs. Comcast can't also add policies ad-hoc unilaterally. Tell them you will not stop using the service, and that their communication to you is proof that you are most likely going to be targeted by law-enforcement agencies due to Comcast snooping and discriminating your internet usage.

You can sue them for discrimination out of the blue, just from that call, as they are probing your ability to be blacklisted.
You can sue them for breach of contract if they cut your line and/or suspend your contract like they said they would.

about 3 months ago
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Snowden Granted 3 More Years of Russian Residency

cloud.pt Anal what? (266 comments)

Nice typo, Anatoly Kucherena will be pleased :D.

Apparently the original source, among other sites, added the extra L, so poster has an excuse :D

about 4 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Good Technology Conferences To Attend?

cloud.pt Black Hat (131 comments)

You need to find better ways to cover your tracks after browsing them freshmen girls mobile photo. If boss asks about the name, just tell them it's a reference to Harry Potter, and the black hat is for wizardry

about 5 months ago
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Leaked Docs Offer Win 8 Tip: FinFisher Spyware Can't Tap Skype's Metro App

cloud.pt IT'S A TRAP (74 comments)

This is just another one of the recent MS gimmicks to get you to switch to the Metro version.

I just received a very official Skype Team email stating my desktop version would be automatically removed. That's exactly what it said: YOUR SKYPE VERSION WILL BE REMOVED. If a company would add such a trigger on an application (even one that highly depends on a single external cloud service to do anything at all), I would call that heavy persuasion.

about 5 months ago
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Man Booted From Southwest Flight and Threatened With Arrest After Critical Tweet

cloud.pt Kimberley apparently did stuff right (928 comments)

Southwest policy appears to restrict entrance in this very specific case to JUST after all A-list passengers and before others. This is because his kids were older than 4 and NOT entitled to A-list boarding. If they were younger than 4, the hostess would be infringing policy. But she was actually enforcing policy strictly, doing her job as she is told to.

The real problem here is a conflict between the freedom of speech right and the defamation civil wrong (for which she can sue actually). I personally don't think there is real libel here, but some might argue that using the hostess's name on the tweet is reason enough for her to sue. What is impressive is the fact the guy had to go to the news after the incident to whine even more, and that gets me thinking he is a little more butthurt than he should for nothing important. He pretty much wanted the hostess fired from her job, which is her source of income. I think everybody gets defensive when their job is at stake. And all this for not indulging him in something he didn't have the right to, despite being "used to" have.

She wanted to avoided having defamation about her and the company wanted to avoid bad publicity. If the tweet was still up, he would have been left on the ground and he could be sued. If they let him fly without deleting the tweet, hostess would have been fired and both hostess and company could sue. This was the best scenario for both... Until he decided to strike back like a little girl. He could have never used the company again for the lack of poise but he just had to make the issue bigger. These are my two cents about it,

about 5 months ago

Submissions

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Electronic Cigarette WHO and co. Position 'Alarmist', say top UK Researchers

cloud.pt cloud.pt writes  |  about 4 months ago

cloud.pt (3412475) writes "Earlier this summer, the World Health Organization was quick to dismiss nicotine dispensing replacement e-cigs (or now more commonly referred as vaporizers by its users), after stating in May that their position was in the making about the subject by its Tobacco Free Initiative. Old Media has also been swift in discrediting e-cig usage, mostly focusing on the negative aspects which are yet to be proven. Now, BBC has gathered top UK academical research about the subject, which sees the WHO statements as "alarmist" and "misleading", biased for the cons and against the pros of using vaporizers over death-stick replacements. Investigators claim the organization might even be affecting public safety with the unpondered claims. Research also points out e-cig usage is saving 6.000 lives per year in the UK alone, and could prevent premature death for 60.000 if everybody made the switch today.

Imperial College London had also released[paywalled] a 5000 people study this year which found e-cig usage was a healthier practice than smoking, and was more effective than other conventional methods to quit."
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Radionomy buys Winamp from AOL, will "offer Winamp's ... just as it is today"

cloud.pt cloud.pt writes  |  about a year ago

cloud.pt (3412475) writes "Winamp's demise has apparently been halted through a 'cash and share' deal between AOL and Belgic-based Radionomy, for a reported value between $5 million and $10 million, $70 million short of Nullsoft's original purchase value back in 1999. The deal will also include Winamp's radio broadcasting services, Shoutcast. Radionomy focuses on the digital audio business and will now own the rights to about half of old fashioned stations online broadcasts, thanks to the Shoutcast part of the deal. Apparently "the intention is to continue to develop both products" and distribution will continue "just as it is today", meaning both ad-supported and payed Pro options can be expected at the least."

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