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Band Releases Album As Linux Kernel Module

cold fjord Kernel, bah! (120 comments)

What about an Emacs package? Or does the band not speak with a Lisp?

yesterday
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WhatsApp Is Well On Its Way To A Billion Users

cold fjord Exposing the other (107 comments)

It's always fascinating to find yet another way one differs from hundreds of millions or even billions of other people.

yesterday
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Band Releases Album As Linux Kernel Module

cold fjord Re:Lol wut (120 comments)

Music to be pwned by.

yesterday
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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

cold fjord Re:Cut off your nose to spite your face (86 comments)

That doesn't seem to be true.

The Many Flaws of Dual_EC_DRBG

Back in 2004-5, NIST decided to address a longstanding weakness of the FIPS standards, namely, the limited number of approved pseudorandom bit generator algorithms (PRGs, or 'DRBGs' in NIST parlance) available to implementers. This was actually a bit of an issue for FIPS developers, since the existing random number generators had some known design weaknesses.*

  NIST's answer to this problem was Special Publication 800-90, parts of which were later wrapped up into the international standard ISO 18031. The NIST pub added four new generators to the FIPS canon. None these algorithms is a true random number generator in the sense that they collect physical entropy. Instead, what they do is process the (short) output of a true random number generator -- like the one in Linux -- conditioning and stretching this 'seed' into a large number of random-looking bits you can use to get things done.** This is particularly important for FIPS-certified cryptographic modules, since the FIPS 140-2 standards typically require you to use a DRBG as a kind of 'post-processing' -- even when you have a decent hardware generator.

  The first three SP800-90 proposals used standard symmetric components like hash functions and block ciphers. Dual_EC_DRBG was the odd one out, since it employed mathematics more that are typically used to construct public-key cryptosystems. This had some immediate consequences for the generator: Dual-EC is slow in a way that its cousins aren't. Up to a thousand times slower.

Now before you panic about this, the inefficiency of Dual_EC is not necessarily one of its flaws! Indeed, the inclusion of an algebraic generator actually makes a certain amount of sense. The academic literature includes a distinguished history of provably secure PRGs based on on number theoretic assumptions, and it certainly didn't hurt to consider one such construction for standardization. Most developers would probably use the faster symmetric alternatives, but perhaps a small number would prefer the added confidence of a provably-secure construction.

yesterday
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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

cold fjord Re:Cut off your nose to spite your face (86 comments)

I don't remember if I've seen that link before, but thanks for sharing it. That is a great explanation, and reinforces the point I've been making.

The Many Flaws of Dual_EC_DRBG

The 'back door' in Dual-EC comes exclusively from the relationship between P and Q -- the latter of which is published only in the Dual-EC specification.

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

cold fjord Re: About time! (262 comments)

Why don't you ask Interop why they basically returned a Class A network address block?

Interop Returns 16 Million IPv4 Addresses

Interop gives back a month’s worth of IPv4 addresses

Apparently Interop, the holder of the 45.x.x.x block since 1995, no longer needs that much space. They're now returning 99 percent of it to ARIN, the American Registry for Internet Numbers, which handles IP address distribution in North America. Interop is holding on to a small fraction of the 45/8 block that's currently in active use.

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

cold fjord Re:About time! (262 comments)

Your point is wrong. Much of the internet is reached by client nodes using NAT now.

Does your internet have any firewalls on it?

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

cold fjord Re:About time! (262 comments)

Client nodes reach the public internet just fine using NAT.

yesterday
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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

cold fjord Re:Cut off your nose to spite your face (86 comments)

You could keep Dual_EC_DRBG by updating the standard to have a new set of constants just like you can update the standard to remove Dual_EC_DRBG entirely. It isn't that hard.

I never claimed that the existing constants were created via an open process. What I pointed out is that a new set of constants could be created by an open process and that addresses the trust issue.

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

cold fjord Re:About time! (262 comments)

That would have about as much effect as pissing into the ocean would have on raising sea levels.

That isn't completely true due to the high degree of leveraging that can occur with NAT. It only takes a relatively small number of public addresses to service millions of private IP client addresses. There are very large numbers of private IP addresses being wasted. One properly used Class A block could allow you to service many billions of client computers.

I agree that we do need to move to IPv6.

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

cold fjord Re:About time! (262 comments)

And hopefully more large companies and organizations that hold large blocks of public IP addresses will start moving to private IP addresses and release the public IP addresses for use by others. I know some places that have large numbers of systems with public IP addresses that are behind firewalls and really have no business having a public IP address on those systems anymore.

yesterday
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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

cold fjord Re:Cut off your nose to spite your face (86 comments)

Oh dear, did something I wrote bruise your feelings at some point? That's too bad. What is worse is that you don't understand that establishing the facts is a different question than making an assessment. You don't seem to be up to judging my thought process at the moment.

yesterday
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The US Public's Erratic Acceptance of Science

cold fjord Re:You are going to see that where Science conflic (550 comments)

The Current Science that we have, with the technology and Anthropology we have, rules out the possibility of the Christian religion having any basis in reality. It doesn't rule out the possibility a god exists. It only means that the current dominant Abrahamic religions are not realistic descriptions of the universe we live in.

Which science is that then? Is it the science that claims we live in a multiverse where there are infinite universes where every possibility happens? Is it the science that claims our universe is a hologram? Is it the science that claims we popped into existence through a fluctuation in quantum probability? Is it the science that claims to explain what the universe is and how it came about, except that it doesn't know what the dark matter and dark energy are that constitute the overwhelming majority of it ... assuming it exists at all and the explanation isn't actually a modified theory of gravity like TeVeS or some such? Is it the science that claimed that the coelacanth was dead for 66 million years .... until one was caught in 1938? Is it the science that claimed the city of Troy didn't exist ... until it was found? Is that the science that said that the Antikythera Mechanism shouldn't exist? Is it the science that claimed that the walls of Jericho falling outward was a myth ... until it was proven? Is it the science that claimed it was impossible that the Bible was transmitted accurately through the centuries.... until the Dead Sea scrolls and other document fragments were found to prove that it had been?

Perhaps you should prepare yourself for further "refinement" in the understanding of science on various matters?

But these religions justify how we treat other people, why certain social groups are stigmatized, and have a heavy impact on who are leaders are, what our laws are, how we raise our children, and the legitimacy of the standing governments. If the Religions aren't true, then there is no justification for the political positions of MANY people in the US Government.

Shall we contrast Marxism or Marxist-Leninism which has been claimed to be a "science" by countless millions over the last century, and which has been the governing philosophy for a large percentage of the earth's population into the 1990s (and still governs China and three lesser nations) with the Bible? Marxist principles (14:16-23:16) call for the destruction of the class enemy in the revolutionary struggle, and the destruction of primitive societies that were too far behind to catch up with the revolutionary struggle which at the time would have included groups such as the Serbs, Bretons, Basques, and Scottish Highlanders. The National Socialists, another set of socialists inspired by Marx, exterminated the "unfit," the deformed, gays, Jews, and many others.

Should we branch off into the Progressives and their ideas about eugenics?

And what of the Bible?

One of the teachers of the law came and heard them debating. Noticing that Jesus had given them a good answer, he asked him, “Of all the commandments, which is the most important?”

“The most important one,” answered Jesus, “is this: ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself. There is no commandment greater than these.” -- Mark 12:28-31

Your views seem very questionable on both the science and the question of religion.

yesterday
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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

cold fjord Re:Cut off your nose to spite your face (86 comments)

You should have read the next line. Apparently you aren't there yet.

Once you understand that you can apply your suspicions.

yesterday
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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

cold fjord Re:Cut off your nose to spite your face (86 comments)

The problem isn't the algorithm. The "problem" is specifically a question of trust in how the constants for the curve were developed. There is no backdoor if you don't create one from the start. The possibility of there being one is gone if you have an open process to create the curve values in which a backdoor isn't created. At that point the remaining issue is performance. Up till now there have been three other RNGs in the standard if you don't like Dual_EC_DRBG. Yes you can compare the situation to DES because the issue in question is the same in both cases: trust in the body creating the standard. The fact that they are different types of encryption is meaningless. Either NSA did or didn't backdoor DES. Either NSA did or didn't backdoor Dual_EC_DRBG. There is now enough accumulated knowledge and evidence to say that they didn't backdoor DES. We may never know about Dual_EC_DRBG. Suspicion is reasonable, claims of knowledge aren't unless you worked at NSA on that standards effort unless you want to say you "just know."

2 days ago
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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

cold fjord Re:Cut off your nose to spite your face (86 comments)

That really isn't right, is it? You're abusing the notion of "backdoor." The evidence that a backdoor is possible is incontrovertible. But practically speaking to have access to that backdoor you have to develop the backdoor values as part of defining the curve for the standard / implementation. If you don't develop the backdoor values as part of defining the curve then you are essentially back to solving the original problem in order to get your "shortcut". In other words, it is no help at all if you don't do it from the start. An unknown "backdoor" that is as hard or harder to solve than the original math problem isn't really what you could call a backdoor in conventional terms, is it?

Conclusions about Dual_EC_DRBG

The bias in the output mentioned earlier is concerning, but there are no known attacks against Dual_EC_DRBG unless you have pre-existing knowledge of the relationship between P and Q. In other words, this backdoor (if true as alleged) allows the NSA to break Dual_EC_DRBG but does not make it much vulnerable to anyone else. This is much different than a backdoor password which would be immediately usable by any adversary who discovered it (e.g. by reverse engineering the code).

On the Possibility of a Back Door in the NIST SP800-90 Dual Ec Prng

2 days ago
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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

cold fjord Re:Cut off your nose to spite your face (86 comments)

So, what are these algorithms that are impossible to backdoor either through design or implementation? No chance of another something like heartbleed, or Reflections on Trusting Trust?

There is actually nothing wrong with the algorithm for Dual_EC_DRBG, the issue is with people's trust of the constants that define the curve for it in the standard. The only issue there is that people don't trust them just like they didn't trust the NSA generated S-boxes that strengthened DES against secret cryptanalysis techniques. Choosing a new set of known good constants for the standard would resolves all the issues other than performance. Of course that would mean you would need to verify the new configuration was still good and generated proper numbers. (And no matter what you do there will be people that mistrust it, just as this thread started.)

Paranoia can be a useful factor in dealing with security, but it should be moderated and harnessed in a positive manner. If not you end up making mistakes due to poor judgment as I discussed in my other post on DES. You assume the worst case, flop around and make an ever worse choice.

2 days ago
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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

cold fjord Re:Cut off your nose to spite your face (86 comments)

That may be at some level, but keep it mind that operating only on suspicion makes it easy to end up in the "didn't use DES, got data read by differential cryptanalysis (or method X)" bin. Your choice. It is easy to have suspicions that aren't well founded, as well as false confidence.

Math majors get heavily recruited for those jobs for a reason. Sound encryption doesn't tend to emerge from whimsy.

2 days ago
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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

cold fjord Re:Cut off your nose to spite your face (86 comments)

Clear thinking generally takes some effort. You should always be clear about what the evidence proves and what it doesn't prove or you are likely to make mistakes. Once you understand that you can apply your suspicions. There were plenty of people that assumed that DES was backdoored due to the changes made in the DES S-boxes prior to the standard being approved. They refused to use DES and used other technologies. It was later revealed that DES had been hardened against secret cryptanalysis techniques that cracked other methods. The people that refused to use DES and used those other methods were unknowingly using weaker encryption due simply to their suspicions. Operating by suspicion can be hazardous when it comes to encryption. Of course the flip side is true too, as the Ultra cracks of Enigma showed.

2 days ago

Submissions

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Sexually Transmitted Virus Sterilizes Insects While Encouraging Mating

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about three weeks ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "National Geographic reports, "Why would a sterile male cricket mate with an infertile female? On the surface, this behaviour makes no sense: sex takes energy and effort, and there’s nothing in it for either of these partners. Neither one can foster the next generation. Shelley Adamo from Dalhousie University has the answer. Her team have shown that one particular insect virus can sterilise crickets, but also change their behaviour so they continue to mate with each other. By doing so, they pass the virus on to uninfected hosts. This virus is the latest example of parasitic mind control ... Scientists have now documented hundreds of such manipulators." — TED2014 Video"
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Data-Stealing Snoopy Drone Unveiled At Black Hat

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about three weeks ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "BBC reports, "Security firm SensePost has unveiled its Snoopy drone, which can steal data from unsuspecting smartphone users, at the Black Hat security conference in Singapore. The drone uses the company's software, which is installed on a computer attached to a drone. That code can be used to hack smartphones and steal personal data — all without a user's knowledge." — Ars Technica reports, "The researchers behind an earlier version of Snoopy that tracked only Wi-Fi signals have already used it to track more than 42,000 unique devices during a single 14-hour experiment in 2012 at the King's Cross train station in London. ... Snoopy has a creepy ability to collect a dizzying array of data, such as unique device IDs, including their changing locations, the Wi-Fi access points the devices hail, and unencrypted data carried in their radio signals. Once the data is collected and stockpiled, virtually all of it can cross-referenced to reveal key details about the users, including their employers and friends, and possibly names and addresses. To make it easier to find relationships, the data can be visualized using Maltego or similar software. "What's nice is this pulls all the data together and allows you to explore it over time," Wilkinson said."
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The 3D Economy - What happens when everyone prints their own shoes?

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "From Reason: "Last May, Cody Wilson produced an ingeniously brief but nuanced manifesto about individual liberty in the age of the ever-encroaching techno-state-a single shot fired by a plastic pistol fabricated on a leased 3D printer. While Wilson dubbed his gun The Liberator, his interests and concerns are broader than merely protecting the Second Amendment. ... Wilson is ultimately aiming for the "transcendence of the state." And yet because of the nature of his invention, many observers reacted to his message as reductively as can be: "OMG, guns!" ... But if armies of Davids really want to transcend the state, there are even stronger weapons at their disposal: toothbrush holders, wall vases, bottle openers, shower caddies, and tape dispensers. ... Imagine what will happen when millions of people start using the tools that produced The Liberator to make, copy, swap, barter, buy, and sell all the quotidian stuff with which they furnish their lives. Rest in peace, Bed, Bath & Beyond. Thanks for all the stuff, Foxconn, but we get our gadgets from Pirate Bay and MEGA now. Once the retail and manufacturing carnage starts to scale, the government carnage will soon follow. How can it not, when only old people pay sales tax, fewer citizens obtain their incomes from traditional easy-to-tax jobs, and large corporate taxpayers start folding like daily newspapers? Without big business, big government can't function.""
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Survey Finds Nearly 50% in US Believe in Medical Conspiracy Theories

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "NY Daily News reports, "About half of American adults believe in at least one medical conspiracy theory, according to new survey results. (paywalled, first page viewable) Some conspiracy theories have much more traction than others ... three times as many people believe U.S. regulators prevent people from getting natural cures as believe that a U.S. spy agency infected a large number of African Americans with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). J. Eric Oliver, the study's lead author from University of Chicago, said people may believe in conspiracy theories because they're easier to understand than complex medical information. ... Some 49 percent of the survey participants agreed with at least one of the conspiracies. In fact, in addition to the 37 percent of respondents who fully agreed that U.S. regulators are suppressing access to natural cures, less than a third were willing to say they actively disagreed with the theory." — One of the conspiracy theories, that the US created the AIDs virus, was created for an active disinformation campaign by the Soviet Union against the US as a form of political warfare during the Cold War, and still gets repeated."
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Deeper Insights Into The Prisoner's Dilemma

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The American Scientist reports, "Prisoner’s Dilemma has been a subject of inquiry for more than 60 years, not just by game theorists but also by psychologists, economists, political scientists, and evolutionary biologists. Yet the game has not given up all its secrets. A startling discovery last year revealed a whole new class of strategies, including some bizarre ones. For example, over a long series of games one player can unilaterally dictate the other player’s score (within a certain range). Or a crafty player can control the ratio of the two scores. But not all the new strategies are so manipulative; some are “generous” rules that elicit cooperation and thereby excel in an evolutionary context.""
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The Earth May Have Twice As Much Water As Previously Thought

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month and a half ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "CBC reports, "A dirty, $10 diamond with a prize inside has helped reveal that there are vast quantities of water stored deep inside the Earth. The diamond formed in the "transition zone" around 410 to 660 kilometres below our planet's surface. Analysis of a mineral grain trapped inside it suggests that it came from surroundings that were about one per cent water, report researchers led by University of Alberta geochemist Graham Pearson. They published their findings online in the journal Nature today. (abstract) If the sample is representative of that part of the deep Earth, the amount of water there could be "about the same as the mass of all the world’s oceans combined," wrote Hans Keppler, a geophysicist at the University of Bayreuth ... That, in turn, changes our understanding of the way water cycles through our planet, and has implications for the way tectonic plates and volcanoes behave, Pearson notes.""
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Turing's Theory Of Chemical Morphogenesis Validated 60 Years After His Death

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month and a half ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Phys.org reports, "Alan Turing's accomplishments in computer science are well known, but lesser known is his impact on biology and chemistry. In his only paper on biology (abstract), Turing proposed a theory of morphogenesis, or how identical copies of a single cell differentiate, for example, into an organism with arms and legs, a head and tail. Now, 60 years after Turing's death, researchers from Brandeis University and the University of Pittsburgh have provided the first experimental evidence that validates Turing's theory in cell-like structures. The team published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, March 10.""
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Massachusetts Court Says 'Upskirt' Photos Are Legal

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month and a half ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "CNN reports, "Massachusetts' highest court ruled Wednesday that it is not illegal to secretly photograph underneath a person's clothing — a practice known as "upskirting" — prompting one prosecutor to call for a revision of state law. The high court ruled that the practice did not violate the law because the women who were photographed while riding Boston public transportation were not nude or partially nude.""
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Strange State of Matter Found For First Time In Biological System

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month and a half ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Live Science reports, "Never before seen in biology, a state of matter called "disordered hyperuniformity" has been discovered in the eye of a chicken. This arrangement of particles appears disorganized over small distances but has a hidden order that allows material to behave like both a crystal and a liquid. ... Researchers say this may be the first time disordered hyperuniformity has been observed in a biological system; previously it had only been seen in physical systems like liquid helium and simple plasmas." — More at Princeton."
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Russia admits that it has moved troops in Ukraine

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Telegraph reports, "Russian troops have moved into Crimea in what Moscow is calling a mission to “protect Black Sea Fleet’s positions” but which the Ukrainian government has denounced as an “armed intervention.” The Russian foreign ministry said Friday that it had informed the Ukrainian government that armoured units from the Black Sea Fleet base near Sevastopol had entered Crimea in order to protect fleet positions. “The Ukrainian side was also passed a note regarding the movement of armoured vehicles of the Russian Black Sea Fleet in Crimea, which is happening in full accordance with the foundation Russian-Ukrainian agreement on the Black Sea Fleet,” the ministry said in a statement posted on its website on Friday afternoon. In the same note the Russian foreign ministry said it had declined a Ukrainian request for “bilateral consultations” on events in Crimea because they are “the result of recent internal political processes in Ukraine.” " — Fox News reports, "The United States warned Russia it would be a "grave mistake" to intervene militarily in Ukraine, as the Kremlin ordered 150,000 troops to test their combat readiness and armed men seized government buildings in Ukraine's Crimea region and raised a Russian flag over a barricade." — USA Today reports Former Ukrainian President Yanukovych has surfaced in Moscow after fleeing the country and being removed by parliament."
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Researchers Have Developed Technique To Create Self-Organizing Drone Swarms

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Register reports, "Researchers have taught flying drones to behave like birds, clearing the way for further development of technologies to marshal swarms of unmanned aerial vehicles. In a paper titled Outdoor flocking and formation flight with autonomous aerial robots boffins from Budapet's Eötvös University Department of Biological Physics describe how they have been able to teach quadcopters to flock – an approach that lets them work like swarms of birds, traveling in a self-adjusting, self-stabilizing fleet that doesn't need to communicate back to a central controller." — More at Nature."
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The challenge of the modern scientist is to avoid career suicide

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "From The Conversation, " .... the all-consuming nature of code development means that an individual researcher may not uncover ... major scientific results, missing out on the publications and citations that are the currency of modern science. Other researchers, those that just use rather than develop such codes, are able to reap the rewards, and this better paves their way into an academic career. The rewards go to those that seek to answer the questions, not those that make it happen. With fewer publications under their belt, those that develop the tools needed by the scientific community find themselves pushed ... out of academia. Some senior academics recognise this path to career suicide, and young researchers are steered into projects with a more stable future ... But we are then faced with a growing challenge on who will develop the necessary tools for Big Science to continue to flourish.""
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Google ordered to remove anti-Islamic film from YouTube

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The NY Daily News reports, "A federal judge ordered Wednesday that YouTube must take down a film blamed by the Obama administration for sparking the deadly September 2012 protests at the American embassy in Benghazi, Libya. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ordered the video hosting site to yank the controversial 14-minute film, “Innocence of Muslims.”" ... The ruling addressed only the copyright issue, not the film's content, which YouTube has contended did not violate its terms of service." — Techdirt has some extensive commentary on the ruling and issue worth reading. It seems likely there will be an appeal, with the distinct possibility that Google and the MPAA will be on the same side."
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Supreme Court Ruling Expands Police Authority In Home Searches

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The LA Times reports, "Police officers may enter and search a home without a warrant as long as one occupant consents, even if another resident has previously objected, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday ... The 6-3 ruling ... gives authorities more leeway to search homes without obtaining a warrant, even when there is no emergency. The majority ... said police need not take the time to get a magistrate's approval before entering a home in such cases. But dissenters ... warned that the decision would erode protections against warrantless home searches. ... The case began when LAPD officers responded to reports of a street robbery ... They pursued a suspect to an apartment building, heard shouting inside a unit and knocked on the door. Roxanne Rojas opened the door, but her boyfriend, Walter Fernandez, told officers they could not enter without a warrant. ... Fernandez was arrested in connection with the street robbery and taken away. An hour later, police returned and searched his apartment, this time with Rojas' consent. They found a shotgun and gang-related material.""
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Spy Chief James Clapper: We Can't Stop Another Snowden

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Daily Beast reports, "Snowden pilfered documents from databases designed to share intelligence more broadly within the government. Promoting this integration of secrets is the primary mission of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). The office was created on the recommendation of the 9/11 Commission that faulted the intelligence agencies for jealously guarding information that could have prevented the attacks of that day. Clapper and his predecessors were supposed to help transform the intelligence community’s “need to know” culture to one of “need to share.” Snowden (and Chelsea Manning before him) were able to exploit the reforms ... the very human nature of the bureaucracy he controls virtually insures that more mass disclosures are inevitable. “In the end,” he says, “we will never ever be able to guarantee that there will not be an Edward Snowden or another Chelsea Manning because this is a large enterprise composed of human beings with all their idiosyncrasies.”""
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NSA Exploring Options For Relinquishing Telephone Record Metadata

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Washington Post reports, "The National Security Agency has been exploring options for relinquishing its massive database of telephone records ... The agency was expected to deliver to the White House this week some proposals for storing the data outside of government hands — a goal President Obama announced in January to ease concerns about potential NSA abuse ... “At the end of the day, this is going to be a policy decision, with legal implementation,” said NSA Deputy Director Rick Ledgett in a recent interview, noting that the NSA does not make policy or law. “But what we’re doing, along with the [FBI], is advising on the parameters that would make the program valuable.” ... “This program,” Ledgett said, “has to be useful to the FBI.” The NSA collects data on phone calls, but not actual call content ... Earlier this month, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence solicited ideas from industry ... Obama directed the director of national intelligence and the attorney general to develop options by March 28." — Director of National Intelligence James Clapper has recently stated that it would have been better if the government had been up front and open with the American people about the metadata program."
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The Science Of Social Participation: Twitter Conversations Have 6 Basic Types

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "PBS reports, "The Pew Research Center and the Social Media Research Foundation analyzed thousands of twitter conversations going back to 2010. They found these conversations occoured based on the structure of the individual’s Twitter network. For example, the subjects and content that a person tweets about, the people they follow, the people who follow them and the way they network creates a structure of social activity. In a recently released report Pew reports that they uncovered six distinct patterns for these structures. “These are data-driven early steps in understanding Twitter discussion structures that contribute to the emerging science of social participation,” Ben Shneiderman professor of computer science at the University of Maryland ... “This new field is emerging right before our eyes and could eventually have a large impact on our understanding of everything from health to community safety, from business innovation to citizen science and from civic engagement to sustainable energy programs.” ... “These maps provide insights into people’s behavior in a way that complements and expands on traditional research methods ... """
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'DOOM' Beta Will Be Pre-Order Bonus For 'Wolfenstein: The New Order'

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Brace yourself the beta, the Doom beta. Gamespot reports, "Remember Doom 4? It's not dead! And it's now just called Doom, presumably. And there's going to be a beta. Anyone who preorders a copy of upcoming Wolfenstein: The New Order will gain access to the Doom beta. But Bethesda isn't saying when that beta might be. Or what platforms it will be on. It is saying, however, that you'll need to be over 18 to participate. Sounds like it might be a bit gory, then. More information can be found on Bethesda's Doom beta site." Forbes reports, "Wolfenstein: The New Order will launch on May 20th""
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Hacking Of US Navy Extensive, Repair Cost $10M And 4 Months. Upgrades Needed

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Australian reports, "Iran's infiltration of a US Navy computer network was far more extensive than previously thought ... hackers targeted the ... network used by ... the Navy to host websites, store non-sensitive information and handle voice, video and data communications. The network has 800,000 users ... “It was a real big deal,” said the senior US official. “It was a significant penetration ...” ... the penetration allowed the Iranians to conduct surveillance on the Navy’s and Marine Corps’ unclassified networks ... the cost to repair the Navy network ... was approximately $US10 million. ... The attack and other cyberthreats prompted a broader review of Navy and DoD network security and upgrades ... were needed. The added defences are expected to cost several hundred million dollars ... within three weeks of the intrusion, officials understood the full scope of the attack and put in place a plan to try and push the intruders out. ... the unclassified network was taken down twice for upgrades ... officials were surprised at the skills of the Iranian hackers. Previously, their tactics had been far cruder ... denial of service attacks ..." — Also at Fox News."
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US Intelligence Chief Clapper: We Should've Told You We Track Your Calls

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Daily Beast reports, "In an exclusive interview ... Clapper said the problems facing the U.S. intelligence community over its collection of phone records could have been avoided. “... Had we been transparent about this from the outset right after 9/11 ... and said both to the American people and to their elected representatives, we need to cover this gap, we need to make sure this never happens to us again, so here is what we are going to set up, here is how it’s going to work, and why we have to do it, and here are the safeguards We wouldn’t have had the problem we had,” Clapper said. “What did us in here ... was this shocking revelation,” he said, referring to the first disclosures from Snowden. If the program had been publicly introduced ... most Americans would probably have supported it. “I don’t think it would be of any greater concern to most Americans than fingerprints. ... ” ... Clapper still defends the 215 program ... The storage of the phone records allows NSA analysts to connect phone numbers of suspected terrorists overseas to a possible network inside the United States. Other U.S. intelligence officials say its real value is that it saves work for the FBI and the NSA ... “For me it was not some massive assault on civil liberties and privacy because of what we actually do and the safeguards that are put on this,” he said. “To guard against perhaps these days low probability but a very (high) impact thing if it happens.” Clapper compared the 215 program to fire insurance.""
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