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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

cold fjord Re:Maybe it would be good if the Ayatollah wins? (258 comments)

You mean like in Syria where the end result has been ISIS?

That's not really a good example since the US and the West didn't back the moderates in a timely fashion. That allowed the Islamist extremists like al Qaida to stream into Syria to form ISIS. If the moderates had been stronger earlier that might not have happened.

I don't think that the current Iranian president is particularly liberal.

As to the Saudis versus the Iranians - at least our friends aren't looking to attack us and work with us on many matters of common interest. You can't really say that about the Iranians.

3 hours ago
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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

cold fjord Re:Ah ... Cold Fjord is a Catholic !! (258 comments)

I'm often impressed by the ability of my critics to find yet another dead end road to travel.

3 hours ago
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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

cold fjord Re:Temptation (258 comments)

Matthew Parris: As an atheist, I truly believe Africa needs God

it wasn't that long ago that there were unofficial death sentences for not embracing Christianity, at least for natives sent to the residential schools here in Canada.

Color me skeptical.

On the other hand, persecution of Christians around the world, including murder, is well known. The record of the officially atheist communist regimes was often quite bad.

4 hours ago
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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

cold fjord Re:It'll lead to dancing (258 comments)

Go over to several middle-eastern shitholes, and there's plenty of barbaric behavior dressed up in the name of both religions.

Where in the Middle East is all this "Christian" head chopping going on? That isn't really happening, is it?

No, it's because they are of the opinion that it's fantasy designed to scare primitive people into accepting social rules (aka "Law").

No, that is yet another but different mistaken idea that some people have. What I was referring to are the people who think that Hell is where all the "fun" will be so they like the idea of going there. Neither belief nor disbelief in it changes its existence any more than the existence of London or Brigadoon.

4 hours ago
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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

cold fjord Re:Same thing from ultra-orthodox Jews. (258 comments)

There is a meaningful difference. In Iran the government chooses the rules and you have no choice but to comply. In New York the followers of the rabbis choose if they want to comply. They are acknowledging that the various communications technologies are tools, that can be used for good or ill, and they are trying to choose what they believe is good. They are choosing, not the government.

5 hours ago
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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

cold fjord Re:The key bit (258 comments)

Thank you for sharing about the Philippines, but that isn't quite the same as it notes in the article.

As for the rest, its nonsense. You also overlook the rights of audiences, organizations, and governments to conduct their assemblies for the intended purpose. Your right to free speech doesn't allow you to prevent others from engaging in theirs. You are simply embracing another form of censorship, an attack on free speech, and one popular with fascists by the way. There are 8760 hours in a year. A limitation during 2 of those hours as to where you protest so as to allow another free speech event to take place for the intended purpose is a minor burden at most even if it is worth discussing and some of them go too far. The much bigger problem is what goes on in college campuses.

5 hours ago
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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

cold fjord Re:It'll lead to dancing (258 comments)

.... but the name dropping of Catholics or Mennonites doesn't have the same guilt-by-association.

To be fair they do a lot less chopping off of heads or hands.

Those without the character to resist sin are damned. Except Jesus specifically conserved with, converted, and saved sinners.

It is Christian teaching that everyone needs that salvation from Christ, not only for forgiveness of sin, but to address ones sinful nature.

The ones who chuckle to themselves about going to hell? I think very few actually embrace going to hell.

Plenty do, but that is because they misunderstand the nature of Hell.

6 hours ago
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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

cold fjord Re:The key bit (258 comments)

And which governments are those? The only enduring "free speech zones" you find in the US on are some college campuses when they are often struck down in court. The only other use I can think of is some limited use during some events or parades. Although there are problematic aspects to their use in the US, it is still a long ways from fascism. Or does the existence of the hecklers veto provide the only true measure of freedom?

6 hours ago
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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

cold fjord The key bit (258 comments)

The key bit FTA is here:

“All third generation [3G] and high-speed internet services, prior to realization of the required conditions for the National Information Network [Iran’s government-controlled and censored Internet which is under development], is against Sharia [and] against moral and human standards.”

In short the position is that if you have freedom you will abuse it. That's overall pretty similar to the thinking of al Qaida and ISIS. Strike up the banjos and play "Dueling Theocracy!" Oops, sorry, no music allowed. Or kite flying.

8 hours ago
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Islamic State "Laptop of Doom" Hints At Plots Including Bubonic Plague

cold fjord Re: But is it reaslistic? (353 comments)

This is nothing but cultural imperialism - imposing our own, "correct" values at gunpoint and forcing the native peoples to accept it or die.

Women in traditional Muslim countries are pushing for reform as they can. Saudi women drive in protest. Afghan women and girls go to school despite death threats and acid attacks. There are plenty of examples. Why would you think that women would be satisfied with being confined to burkas, forced to be escorted outside the home by a male relative, accept being beaten with sticks, and so on?

P.S. "Islamist" is a right-wing term used only by Islamophobes.

My impression has been that you're usually better informed than that.

yesterday
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Islamic State "Laptop of Doom" Hints At Plots Including Bubonic Plague

cold fjord Re:But is it reaslistic? (353 comments)

It doesn't make sense unless your theory is that Evil President Obama is intentionally dismantling any programs we may have had in order to make terrorist domination of the world easy, twirling his mustache all the way. . . .

You seem to be speculating that Obama is doing things to actively undermine any defenses we have based on... I'm not sure what exactly. This seems to be part of the "bizarro world" theory that people have about political opponents. They think, "I'm against policy X and they're for policy X" means that the other guy is their exact mirror image and end up with, "I'm for fighting terrorism, so he must be for enabling it." No actual evidence of policy disagreement or bad policy is necessary. It's just reasonable to assume that the other guy is making a hash of it because he's your opposite and you'd be doing everything right.

Apparently you believe that all well intentioned actions regardless of how different they are have the same result in the end. Cut 100,000 troops to the Army and slash its budget by $50 billion is the same as adding 100,000 troops to the Army and adding $50 billion to its budget. Refusing to capture and interrogate terrorists provides just as much information as capturing and interrogating them. Is there any chance that you can spot the nonsense there? Can you make an allowance for well intentioned but flawed, counterproductive actions resulting from decision making based on ideology divorced from the facts? Is that a possibility? Or does it all devolve to "mustache twirling"? That is just so tedious. Do you pay any attention to the news?

Pentagon Set to Slash Military to Pre-World War II Levels

...so it would be kind of surprising if the DOD ignored the whole thing for all those years and should start scrambling now that some guys playing solider in homebrew camps are thinking about it.

DOD is great for the 1% of Americans involved with the military. Unfortunately that doesn't do much for the other 99%.

My understanding is that it's a "treat with antibiotics after exposure" type of thing. And we have and produce lots of antibiotics, many of which I remember us ramping up production on post 9/11.

There are vaccines for plague, but other than the military or some travelers not many people get them. Even with treatment the plague still kill around 10% of its victims. When untreated it kill a far higher percentage. About 100 years ago it kill about 2/3 of its victims in the US.

I suspect not, given that they appear to be trying to get it from dead animals at the moment.

There are plenty of groups associated with al Qaida and ISIS. The fact that one is doing that says nothing about what another has been able to do.

yesterday
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Islamic State "Laptop of Doom" Hints At Plots Including Bubonic Plague

cold fjord Re:Hidden Files section? (353 comments)

Nah, you're not very knowledgable yourself. I'm not an expert either but at least read up a bit on history rather than referring to wacky websites

Agreed, you aren't an expert, and you don't seem to have enough of an understanding of the issue to make informed judgments about either my views or what is going on. Instead you are substituting your personal wacky views for hard facts and statements by the Islamists about why they are doing what they are. Maybe you could explain how it is that you know better than they do why they are doing what they are doing? You do realize that there is a long history of insurrection and conquest by Muslim peoples that predates "Western imperialism," don't you?

If reestablishing a Caliphate is of "minor importance" and "among the most silly," then why do they keep declaring them? Why are so many Muslim peoples drawn to them?

Your views seem to be little more than a restatement of politically correct nonsense unconnected to the facts.

yesterday
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Islamic State "Laptop of Doom" Hints At Plots Including Bubonic Plague

cold fjord Re:But is it reaslistic? (353 comments)

Have you ever actually tried to do a serious engineering project from scratch based only on what's in the published literature in any field without consulting somebody who had actually done it? It's actually really hard. The devil is always in the details, ...... It's usually nice to have somebody around who can say, "Yeah, we tried that and it didn't work. ....

Maybe you haven't noticed, but the Middle East is full of countries that have had WMD programs involving chemical and/or biological weapons, and even some nuclear programs. The expertise is out there.

The idea that they're on the brink of a devastating weapon that nobody in the DoD thought to prepare for during the Cold War when we had the entire Soviet weapons program working on it seems like a stretch.

The Cold War is long over and the resources assembled to be prepared to fight if it ever went hot started going away long ago, not unlike the heavy lift space rockets (Saturn V) built to go to the moon. Even the people that knew how to build some those things are retiring and dying. They have already had to try to recreate lost knowledge for materials in nuclear weapons. Knowledge and infrastructure a perishable, and that's assuming you aren't actively dismantling them. There are things we could do in the 1950s and 1960s that we can't today without recreating large industrial programs that would take years to put in place.

Being prepared to fight the Soviets 25 years ago doesn't necessarily buy us anything today.

2 days ago
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Islamic State "Laptop of Doom" Hints At Plots Including Bubonic Plague

cold fjord Re:But is it reaslistic? (353 comments)

There's a difference between "being prepared" and "Oh, shit, let's panic!" When this stuff comes up, the public reaction is usually the latter.

Is the public reaction generally panic? I don't think so. Where do you see the public panicking? The actual reaction is largely indifference by most of the public while commentators like you claim the public is panicking and therefore we should do nothing.

These guys aspire to all sorts of stuff and if even half of it were realistic they would have taken over the world by now

But they have taken over countries before, and endangered many others. You're almost building a strawman there.

The reality is that their resources and competence don't match their aspirations and our policy responses should take that into consideration.

The reality is that they have caused enormous damage and killed many tens of thousands of people (at least) using meager resources. In the manner of the classic guerilla they often take what they need from the government.

Some nutbar in a cave announcing his intention to get hold of a hydrogen bomb and blow us all to hell should cause us to spot check the security of the known hydrogen bomb storage sites. It shouldn't cause us to start digging billion dollar fallout shelters under every major city or grounding airplanes whenever somebody uses the word "hydrogen."

You're not getting that right in several respects. We should continue to secure all sorts of nuclear related materials, as we have been, to prevent dirty bomb attacks, or the theft or illegal sale of fissionable material. Requiring emergency shelters in new construction of various type of buildings as some countries do wouldn't add much to the cost and could pay off in many different disaster or attack scenarios. The nutters in North Korea already have nukes and missiles, the Iranians aspire to them, and eventually others will get them. Some of the nutters likely to end up with nukes may find their destruction an acceptable trade-off if they get to badly damage the US. Just 9-11 resulted in $100,000,000,000 in damage to the US economy. What do you think it would have been had New York been attacked with a nuke which would destroy more than one building? Patting yourself on the back for not "over reacting" to the aspirations of "guys in a cave"* is going to be cold comfort if you need shelters to meet other emergencies and you don't have them.

*Who have already managed to kill thousands of Americans and probably well over 100,000 around the world.

2 days ago
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Islamic State "Laptop of Doom" Hints At Plots Including Bubonic Plague

cold fjord Re:Not so sure (353 comments)

We want to attack ISIS, and *poof*, evidence suddenly shows up that ISIS has weapons of mass destruction.

You might recall that they have recently taken control of sizable territory in Iraq to add to the sizable territory in Syria that they control. You may also recall that there were chemical weapons used in Syria, and apparently not all of that use was by the Assad regime.

One of the problems with the news is that is sometimes gets the story more or less right and your cynicism is powerless to alter the facts.

2 days ago

Submissions

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Systems that can secretly track where cellphone users go around the globe

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a week ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Washington Post reports, "Makers of surveillance systems are offering governments across the world the ability to track the movements of almost anybody who carries a cellphone, whether they are blocks away or on another continent. The technology works by exploiting an essential fact of all cellular networks: They must keep detailed, up-to-the-minute records on the locations of their customers to deliver calls and other services to them. Surveillance systems are secretly collecting these records to map people’s travels over days, weeks or longer ... It is unclear which governments have acquired these tracking systems, but one industry official ... said that dozens of countries have bought or leased such technology in recent years. This rapid spread underscores how the burgeoning, multibillion-dollar surveillance industry makes advanced spying technology available worldwide. “Any tin-pot dictator with enough money to buy the system could spy on people anywhere in the world,” said Eric King, deputy director of Privacy International, ... “This is a huge problem.” ""
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German Intelligence Spying On Allies, Recorded Kerry, Clinton, And Kofi Annan

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about two weeks ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Foreign Policy reports, "The revelation that Germany spies on Turkey, a NATO member, should dispel any notion that spying on allies violates the unwritten rules of international espionage ... For nearly a year, the extent of NSA surveillance on German leaders ... has drawn stern rebuke from the German political and media establishment. ... Merkel went so far as to publicly oust the CIA station chief in Berlin. "Spying among friends is not at all acceptable," Merkel said ... However, Germany's sanctimony toward "friendly" espionage is now a huge embarrassment ... Over the weekend, Der Spiegel reported ... Germany's foreign intelligence collection agency, was spying on Turkey. It also reported ... calls made by Secretary of State John Kerry and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton were accidentally recorded. ..... Turkey's Foreign Ministry said that if the allegations are true, they are "totally unacceptable." Turkey also summoned German Ambassador ... Pohl ... demanding an explanation. ... Lindsay Moran, a former CIA ... officer, doesn't believe that the German spying on American officials was an accident. "I find the notion that [Clinton and Kerry] were accidentally overheard preposterous," ... "It's a kind of delightful revelation given the fact that the Germans have been on their high horse." Christian Whiton, a former ... State Department senior advisor, added that the report on German spying is a perfect example of why rifts over intelligence among allies should be handled quietly and privately." — The Wall Street Journal reports, "Cem Özdemir, the head of the Green party and a leading German politician of Turkish descent, told Spiegel Online it would be "irresponsible" for German spies not to target Turkey given its location as a transit country for Islamic State militants from Europe." More at Spiegel Online and The Wall Street Journal."
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German Intelligence Spying On Allies, Recorded Kerry, Clinton, And Kofi Annan

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about two weeks ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Foreign Policy reports, "The revelation that Germany spies on Turkey, a NATO member, should dispel any notion that spying on allies violates the unwritten rules of international espionage ... For nearly a year, the extent of NSA surveillance on German leaders ... has drawn stern rebuke from the German political and media establishment. ... Merkel went so far as to publicly oust the CIA station chief in Berlin. "Spying among friends is not at all acceptable," Merkel said ... However, Germany's sanctimony toward "friendly" espionage is now a huge embarrassment ... Over the weekend, Der Spiegel reported ... Germany's foreign intelligence collection agency, was spying on Turkey. It also reported ... calls made by Secretary of State John Kerry and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton were accidentally recorded. ..... Turkey's Foreign Ministry said that if the allegations are true, they are "totally unacceptable." Turkey also summoned German Ambassador ... Pohl ... demanding an explanation. ... Lindsay Moran, a former CIA ... officer, doesn't believe that the German spying on American officials was an accident. "I find the notion that [Clinton and Kerry] were accidentally overheard preposterous," ... "It's a kind of delightful revelation given the fact that the Germans have been on their high horse." Christian Whiton, a former ... State Department senior advisor, added that the report on German spying is a perfect example of why rifts over intelligence among allies should be handled quietly and privately." — The Wall Street Journal reports, "Cem Özdemir, the head of the Green party and a leading German politician of Turkish descent, told Spiegel Online it would be "irresponsible" for German spies not to target Turkey given its location as a transit country for Islamic State militants from Europe." More at Spiegel Online and The Wall Street Journal."
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US Department of Homeland Security Providing Online Open Source Code Testing

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "ZDNet reports, "At OSCon, The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) ... quietly announced that they're now offering a service for checking out your open-source code for security holes and bugs: the Software Assurance Marketplace (SWAMP). ... Patrick Beyer, SWAMP's Project Manager at Morgridge Institute for Research, the project's prime contractor, explained, "With open source's popularity, more and more government branches are using open-source code. Some are grabbing code from here, there, and everywhere." Understandably, "there's more and more concern about the safety and quality of this code. We're the one place you can go to check into the code" ... funded by a $23.4 million grant from the Department of Homeland Security Science & Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), SWAMP is designed by researchers from the Morgridge Institute, the University of Illinois-Champaign/Urbana, Indiana University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Each brings broad experience in software assurance, security, open source software development, national distributed facilities and identity management to the project. ... SWAMP opened its services to the community in February of 2014 offering five open-source static analysis tools that analyze source code for possible security defects without having to execute the program. ... In addition, SWAMP hosts almost 400 open source software packages to enable tool developers to add enhancements in both the precision and scope of their tools. On top of that the SWAMP provides developers with software packages from the National Institute for Standards and Technology's (NIST) Juliet Test Suite.""
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In New Zealand The Right To Silence And Presumption Of Innocence Are In Danger

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 1 month ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The New Zealand Herald reports, "Fundamental pillars of the criminal justice system may be eroded whichever party wins the election this year, as both National's and Labour's proposals would look into changing the right to silence or the presumption of innocence in rape cases. Both major parties claim the current system is not upholding justice for victims, and are looking at changes that would effectively make it easier for prosecutors to obtain convictions. National wants to explore allowing a judge or jury to see an accused's refusal to give evidence in a negative light, while Labour wants to shift the burden of proof of consent from the alleged victim to the accused.""
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Swedish Farmers Have Doubts About Climatologists And Climate Change

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "ScienceNordic reports, "Researchers the world over almost unanimously agree that our climate is changing ... But many farmers – at least Swedish ones – have experienced mild winters and shifting weather before and are hesitant about trusting the scientists. The researcher who discovered the degree of scepticism among farmers was surprised by her findings. Therese Asplund ... was initially looking into how agricultural magazines covered climate change. Asplund found after studying ten years of issues of the two agricultural sector periodicals ATL and Land Lantbruk that they present climate change as scientifically confirmed, a real problem. But her research took an unexpected direction when she started interviewing farmers in focus groups about climate issues. Asplund had prepared a long list of questions about how the farmers live with the threat of climate change and what they plan to do to cope with the subsequent climate challenges. The conversations took a different course: “They explained that they didn’t quite believe in climate changes,” she says. “Or at least that these are not triggered by human activities.” ""
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Papers Reveal Source Of Ramanujan's Maths - New Movie Depicts Life

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 3 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Discover reports, "... on the 100th anniversary of Ramanujan’s arrival in Cambridge, the source of his equations was finally found. Ken Ono of Emory University, his graduate student Michael Griffin, and their colleague Ole Warnaar of the University of Queensland presented theorems they had just proved, which vastly generalize the work of Ramanujan and identify the source of his mathematical formulas. ... the two Rogers-Ramanujan identities were just specific examples of a literally infinite reservoir of general identities employing similar infinite sums and products. In Ono’s words, they had found the mother lode that gave Ramanujan his “gold nuggets.” This new, vast ocean of Rogers-Ramanujan-Ono-Griffin-Warnaar identities has the desirable property that it produces algebraic numbers (which are generally hard to obtain) quite readily. One of them is (phi) – the “golden ratio” ubiquitous in art and nature. " — The Deccan Chronicle reports, "The biopic of mathematical genius, Ramanujan, is all set for release in both Tamil and English. ... Abhinay Vaddi, a debutant who plays Ramanujan in the film, says, “I was most excited when I got this offer. ...” ... Abhinay loves mathematics in real life too, having opted for it for his post graduate. " — The trailer at the Times of India."
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"Belief In Evolution" Doesn't Measure Science Literacy

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 3 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Dan Kahan at the Yale Law School Cultural Cognition Project writes, "Because imparting basic comprehension of science in citizens is so critical to enlightened democracy, it is essential that we develop valid measures of it, so that we can assess and improve the profession of teaching science to people. ... The National Science Foundation has been engaged in the project of trying to formulate and promote such a measure for quite some time. A few years ago it came to the conclusion that the item "human beings, as we know them today, developed from earlier species of animals," shouldn't be included when computing "science literacy." The reason was simple: the answer people give to this question doesn't measure their comprehension of science. People who score at or near the top on the remaining portions of the test aren't any more likely to get this item "correct" than those who do poorly on the remaining portions. What the NSF's evolution item does measure, researchers have concluded, is test takers' cultural identities, and in particular the centrality of religion in their lives." — A previous related post"
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Sexually Transmitted Virus Sterilizes Insects While Encouraging Mating

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 5 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "National Geographic reports, "Why would a sterile male cricket mate with an infertile female? On the surface, this behaviour makes no sense: sex takes energy and effort, and there’s nothing in it for either of these partners. Neither one can foster the next generation. Shelley Adamo from Dalhousie University has the answer. Her team have shown that one particular insect virus can sterilise crickets, but also change their behaviour so they continue to mate with each other. By doing so, they pass the virus on to uninfected hosts. This virus is the latest example of parasitic mind control ... Scientists have now documented hundreds of such manipulators." — TED2014 Video"
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Data-Stealing Snoopy Drone Unveiled At Black Hat

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 5 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "BBC reports, "Security firm SensePost has unveiled its Snoopy drone, which can steal data from unsuspecting smartphone users, at the Black Hat security conference in Singapore. The drone uses the company's software, which is installed on a computer attached to a drone. That code can be used to hack smartphones and steal personal data — all without a user's knowledge." — Ars Technica reports, "The researchers behind an earlier version of Snoopy that tracked only Wi-Fi signals have already used it to track more than 42,000 unique devices during a single 14-hour experiment in 2012 at the King's Cross train station in London. ... Snoopy has a creepy ability to collect a dizzying array of data, such as unique device IDs, including their changing locations, the Wi-Fi access points the devices hail, and unencrypted data carried in their radio signals. Once the data is collected and stockpiled, virtually all of it can cross-referenced to reveal key details about the users, including their employers and friends, and possibly names and addresses. To make it easier to find relationships, the data can be visualized using Maltego or similar software. "What's nice is this pulls all the data together and allows you to explore it over time," Wilkinson said."
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The 3D Economy - What happens when everyone prints their own shoes?

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 5 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "From Reason: "Last May, Cody Wilson produced an ingeniously brief but nuanced manifesto about individual liberty in the age of the ever-encroaching techno-state-a single shot fired by a plastic pistol fabricated on a leased 3D printer. While Wilson dubbed his gun The Liberator, his interests and concerns are broader than merely protecting the Second Amendment. ... Wilson is ultimately aiming for the "transcendence of the state." And yet because of the nature of his invention, many observers reacted to his message as reductively as can be: "OMG, guns!" ... But if armies of Davids really want to transcend the state, there are even stronger weapons at their disposal: toothbrush holders, wall vases, bottle openers, shower caddies, and tape dispensers. ... Imagine what will happen when millions of people start using the tools that produced The Liberator to make, copy, swap, barter, buy, and sell all the quotidian stuff with which they furnish their lives. Rest in peace, Bed, Bath & Beyond. Thanks for all the stuff, Foxconn, but we get our gadgets from Pirate Bay and MEGA now. Once the retail and manufacturing carnage starts to scale, the government carnage will soon follow. How can it not, when only old people pay sales tax, fewer citizens obtain their incomes from traditional easy-to-tax jobs, and large corporate taxpayers start folding like daily newspapers? Without big business, big government can't function.""
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Survey Finds Nearly 50% in US Believe in Medical Conspiracy Theories

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 5 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "NY Daily News reports, "About half of American adults believe in at least one medical conspiracy theory, according to new survey results. (paywalled, first page viewable) Some conspiracy theories have much more traction than others ... three times as many people believe U.S. regulators prevent people from getting natural cures as believe that a U.S. spy agency infected a large number of African Americans with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). J. Eric Oliver, the study's lead author from University of Chicago, said people may believe in conspiracy theories because they're easier to understand than complex medical information. ... Some 49 percent of the survey participants agreed with at least one of the conspiracies. In fact, in addition to the 37 percent of respondents who fully agreed that U.S. regulators are suppressing access to natural cures, less than a third were willing to say they actively disagreed with the theory." — One of the conspiracy theories, that the US created the AIDs virus, was created for an active disinformation campaign by the Soviet Union against the US as a form of political warfare during the Cold War, and still gets repeated."
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Deeper Insights Into The Prisoner's Dilemma

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 5 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The American Scientist reports, "Prisoner’s Dilemma has been a subject of inquiry for more than 60 years, not just by game theorists but also by psychologists, economists, political scientists, and evolutionary biologists. Yet the game has not given up all its secrets. A startling discovery last year revealed a whole new class of strategies, including some bizarre ones. For example, over a long series of games one player can unilaterally dictate the other player’s score (within a certain range). Or a crafty player can control the ratio of the two scores. But not all the new strategies are so manipulative; some are “generous” rules that elicit cooperation and thereby excel in an evolutionary context.""
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The Earth May Have Twice As Much Water As Previously Thought

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 6 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "CBC reports, "A dirty, $10 diamond with a prize inside has helped reveal that there are vast quantities of water stored deep inside the Earth. The diamond formed in the "transition zone" around 410 to 660 kilometres below our planet's surface. Analysis of a mineral grain trapped inside it suggests that it came from surroundings that were about one per cent water, report researchers led by University of Alberta geochemist Graham Pearson. They published their findings online in the journal Nature today. (abstract) If the sample is representative of that part of the deep Earth, the amount of water there could be "about the same as the mass of all the world’s oceans combined," wrote Hans Keppler, a geophysicist at the University of Bayreuth ... That, in turn, changes our understanding of the way water cycles through our planet, and has implications for the way tectonic plates and volcanoes behave, Pearson notes.""
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Turing's Theory Of Chemical Morphogenesis Validated 60 Years After His Death

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 6 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Phys.org reports, "Alan Turing's accomplishments in computer science are well known, but lesser known is his impact on biology and chemistry. In his only paper on biology (abstract), Turing proposed a theory of morphogenesis, or how identical copies of a single cell differentiate, for example, into an organism with arms and legs, a head and tail. Now, 60 years after Turing's death, researchers from Brandeis University and the University of Pittsburgh have provided the first experimental evidence that validates Turing's theory in cell-like structures. The team published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, March 10.""
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Massachusetts Court Says 'Upskirt' Photos Are Legal

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 6 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "CNN reports, "Massachusetts' highest court ruled Wednesday that it is not illegal to secretly photograph underneath a person's clothing — a practice known as "upskirting" — prompting one prosecutor to call for a revision of state law. The high court ruled that the practice did not violate the law because the women who were photographed while riding Boston public transportation were not nude or partially nude.""
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Strange State of Matter Found For First Time In Biological System

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 6 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Live Science reports, "Never before seen in biology, a state of matter called "disordered hyperuniformity" has been discovered in the eye of a chicken. This arrangement of particles appears disorganized over small distances but has a hidden order that allows material to behave like both a crystal and a liquid. ... Researchers say this may be the first time disordered hyperuniformity has been observed in a biological system; previously it had only been seen in physical systems like liquid helium and simple plasmas." — More at Princeton."
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Russia admits that it has moved troops in Ukraine

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 6 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Telegraph reports, "Russian troops have moved into Crimea in what Moscow is calling a mission to “protect Black Sea Fleet’s positions” but which the Ukrainian government has denounced as an “armed intervention.” The Russian foreign ministry said Friday that it had informed the Ukrainian government that armoured units from the Black Sea Fleet base near Sevastopol had entered Crimea in order to protect fleet positions. “The Ukrainian side was also passed a note regarding the movement of armoured vehicles of the Russian Black Sea Fleet in Crimea, which is happening in full accordance with the foundation Russian-Ukrainian agreement on the Black Sea Fleet,” the ministry said in a statement posted on its website on Friday afternoon. In the same note the Russian foreign ministry said it had declined a Ukrainian request for “bilateral consultations” on events in Crimea because they are “the result of recent internal political processes in Ukraine.” " — Fox News reports, "The United States warned Russia it would be a "grave mistake" to intervene militarily in Ukraine, as the Kremlin ordered 150,000 troops to test their combat readiness and armed men seized government buildings in Ukraine's Crimea region and raised a Russian flag over a barricade." — USA Today reports Former Ukrainian President Yanukovych has surfaced in Moscow after fleeing the country and being removed by parliament."
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Researchers Have Developed Technique To Create Self-Organizing Drone Swarms

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 6 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Register reports, "Researchers have taught flying drones to behave like birds, clearing the way for further development of technologies to marshal swarms of unmanned aerial vehicles. In a paper titled Outdoor flocking and formation flight with autonomous aerial robots boffins from Budapet's Eötvös University Department of Biological Physics describe how they have been able to teach quadcopters to flock – an approach that lets them work like swarms of birds, traveling in a self-adjusting, self-stabilizing fleet that doesn't need to communicate back to a central controller." — More at Nature."
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The challenge of the modern scientist is to avoid career suicide

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 6 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "From The Conversation, " .... the all-consuming nature of code development means that an individual researcher may not uncover ... major scientific results, missing out on the publications and citations that are the currency of modern science. Other researchers, those that just use rather than develop such codes, are able to reap the rewards, and this better paves their way into an academic career. The rewards go to those that seek to answer the questions, not those that make it happen. With fewer publications under their belt, those that develop the tools needed by the scientific community find themselves pushed ... out of academia. Some senior academics recognise this path to career suicide, and young researchers are steered into projects with a more stable future ... But we are then faced with a growing challenge on who will develop the necessary tools for Big Science to continue to flourish.""
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