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Preventative Treatment For Heartbleed On Healthcare.gov

cold fjord Re:oh, sorry (36 comments)

That would have been insightful if the law hadn't eliminated insurance coverage for many Americans.

2 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Hungry Students, How Common?

cold fjord Re:How's your Russian? (258 comments)

The Russian armies continuing to mass on Ukraine's borders?
Russian special forces and intelligence agents infiltrating Ukraine and instigating insurrection and incidents?
The Russians violating the Open Skies treaty to deny Western and US compliance inspection over-flights of Russia to hide their activity?
The UN finding that the Crimean election wasn't quite as free as claimed?
Putin admitting that the "little green men" in Crimea were, "surprise! surprise!," Russian soldiers after all?
Jews being told they must "register" in an area of Ukraine controlled by Russian separatists? which echoes the problems Russia has with National Socialists?
Russia taking up the "anti-fascist" fight after "defeating fascism" in Poland in 1939 (splitting it with the Germans), "defeating fascism" in Finland in 1940 (annexing Finnish territory), "defeating fascism" in Georgia in 2008 (taking territory from it), and now volunteering to "defeat fascism" in Ukraine despite the fact that Russia seems to be unable to defeat fascism at home?
That momentum is building in Ukraine's legislature for rearming with nuclear weapons which will ironically be accepting Putin's advice offered on Syria?

Ironically, the notion of reacquiring nuclear weapons as a security guarantee is a position publicly advocated by Putin himself: "If you cannot count on international law, then you must find other ways to ensure your security. ... This is logical: If you have the bomb, no one will touch you." -- Is Ukraine about to go nuclear again?

Most Ukrainians are neither loyal Russians nor fascists

Putin has promoted the notion that ethnic Russians were in danger. There has never been evidence for this unless you count as brutal repression a failed attempt to revive an old law making Ukrainian the sole language for court hearings and government forms. Putin calls for greater autonomy for the south and east of Ukraine, and more rights for Russian-speakers, while doing all he can to obstruct elections that would bring them back into the political process.

No doubt there is more. Do you have an inside scoop? Is it, as I fear, that the US is at fault?

2 hours ago
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Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

cold fjord Re:So - who's in love with the government again? (297 comments)

Great Cesar's ghost! You're against a government regulatory effort!?!?* Surely that must be a sign of the apocalypse! And during a blood moon to boot.

*And when did usefulness or futility become a concern?

4 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Hungry Students, How Common?

cold fjord Re:Get creative (258 comments)

And grains, don't forget whole grains. Oats, barley, wheat, etc. Filling and nutritious.

5 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Hungry Students, How Common?

cold fjord Re:Get creative (258 comments)

I will add this:

Beans and frozen vegetables are your friends. Get a crock pot. Make a crock of beans, divide them into servings and freeze them to use as needed. Beans are good nutrition. Meat and bean dishes go much further than just meat. A crock pot is also great for turning less expensive cuts of meat into a feast.

I find that frozen vegetables are much handier than canned, they keep nicely, and don't have all the added salt or other ingredients. Having them in the freezer makes adding vegetables to a dish, or making a side dish, very easy. You can easily have several different types or mixes to use as desired. Spinach in the omelet, mixed veggies in the stew, and so on. Getting those vegetables into your diet is better than just going for a burger and fries all the time.

Eggs are a great source of cheap protein, and sometimes they even go on sale. You can hard boil them to keep them longer.

Keep an eye out for sales on various fruits and vegetables, such as apples, sweet potatoes, or potatoes, and buy a bunch.

Frozen bread dough can be quite a bit cheaper than already baked loaves. Having some in the freezer during bad weather means you can have bread in case there is a run on the store (as sometimes happens) and the shelves are bare.

Raman can be tasty, filing, and tempting, but you might want to leave it as an occasional treat with all the fat and salt in the standard cheap stuff. Nutritionally you're probably better off with a potato.

You'll know you're developing the right mindset if you look at the price of a standard fast food "meal deal" and think to yourself: "I could buy a pound/half kilo of hamburger, a loaf of bread, and add a few pennies of potatoes and eat for 3-4 days for that! If I made a meat and bean stew it would be all week!"

Plan ahead. If you are going out, bring a container of water and a snack, such as an apple. That way you can avoid the temptation of soda and a candy bar. It's cheaper and better for you.

If you do it right, eating fairly cheaply can be healthy too.

6 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Hungry Students, How Common?

cold fjord Re:How's your Russian? (258 comments)

I'm pretty sure Europeans are more worried about the US starting the next war.

I'm pretty sure that Russia has fixed that problem for the Europeans able to make a reasoned judgment that might have actually believed that. The ones that still believe that tend more towards viewing the world with a constant filter applied and it will take an actual occupation or perhaps bombing to adjust it.

6 hours ago
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Snowden Queries Putin On Live TV Regarding Russian Internet Surveillance

cold fjord Re:Snowden never had integrity (388 comments)

Is that really the best you can do in understanding the issue? Or are you simply trolling?

yesterday
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Snowden Queries Putin On Live TV Regarding Russian Internet Surveillance

cold fjord Re:Snowden never had integrity (388 comments)

Somehow you managed to either misunderstand or get wrong nearly all the important points you tried to make.

The A & B example I showed wasn't an illustration of terrorism but of the effect of different levels of information and how they could influence choices of action. How did you both miss and misuse that?

The information about terrorist groups changing communications methods has been in the news on multiple occasions. It wasn't "made up on the spot," you are simply uninformed. And for some reason the logic does not occur to you than when the media says the intelligence agencies watch X that terrorists and others might avoid X. I don't see how you can do that.

What we know from reliable sources is that only the highest levels of the terrorist hierarchy, the senior commanders, that provide high level guidance have generally been protected by the more advanced and labor intensive methods, but the lower levels that actually have to get things done according to some sort of schedule not so much. The lower levels have been much more vulnerable to having their communications intercepted, but Snowden has been tutoring them through the media on the things to avoid.

Snowden's leaks only show technical capability for intercepting communications, what they don't show is the machinery of repression and mass active monitoring that 1984 would require.

yesterday
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Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

cold fjord Re:do they have a progressive view? (326 comments)

I'll be direct: there is nothing wrong with Dallas, it is a fine city. This is about your choice and personal values, not about Dallas.

yesterday
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Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

cold fjord Re:do they have a progressive view? (326 comments)

it's not the bigotry, its the fact they have no zoning laws and some megacorp can build a fertilizer plant next to residential housing and kill people when it explodes
or build some oil refinery next to someone's home and poison their air and water

While I'm sure that Texas has totally managed to avoid the scourge of zoning laws, the California approach has its own drawbacks that are becoming apparent, especially as California is now practically speaking a one party state run by Democrats with super majorities able to pass whatever they want.

California: CEOs Rate It Worst U.S. Business Climate For 8 Years Running
Hundreds of Thousands Flee Democrat-Run California
Just How Bad is California’s Business Climate?
California, a bad bet for business - Why would new enterprises come to a state like this?
Texas v. California: The Real Facts Behind The Lone Star State's Miracle
State leaders closely watch migrating millionaires

yesterday
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Tor Blacklisting Exit Nodes Vulnerable To Heartbleed

cold fjord Re:So much for Net Neutrality. (56 comments)

No, I don't. It wouldn't help if I did. Few people here are up to serious if casual fact based discussions on the matter let alone professional level ones. Fear isn't needed, only an open mind, rational thinking, and knowledge. Many of the threats are already known to various levels but people choose to ignore or disparage them because it suits their purposes, or they aren't up to a serious discussion.

yesterday
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Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

cold fjord Re:do they have a progressive view? (326 comments)

I would die first before moving to texas. most of my friend also feel the same.

That would certainly cut down on your living expenses, and I think most Texans would appreciate the gesture.

yesterday
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Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

cold fjord Re:do they have a progressive view? (326 comments)

The "progressive" techies in Texas gravitate to the most "progressive" parts of Texas.

FTFY

How the Dallas-Fort Worth Tech Sector Has Roared Back

The Dallas-Fort Worth area is one of the most significant high-tech business centers in the United States, with several global leadership brands. With about 3,000 technology companies and nearly 230,000 high-tech employees, DFW is arguably the second-largest technology business center in the country, behind California’s Silicon Valley.

yesterday
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Tor Blacklisting Exit Nodes Vulnerable To Heartbleed

cold fjord Re:So much for Net Neutrality. (56 comments)

Oh, I see, the only thing that counts is the gravest possible outcome that is also by far the least likely. Lesser outcomes that might kill people by the hundreds, thousand, or tens of thousands don't count? Outcomes that we could not influence that damage friends or allies due to being blinded don't count? Being put at a serious disadvantage to foreign adversaries doesn't count? It's just fine with you that Russia or China seizes territory from whatever other country they care to, and which but for proper warning might have been avoided? Iran getting nuclear weapons to put on top of the missiles they already have that are capable of reaching Europe doesn't count (despite Iranian threats against Europe)? A jihadi from Manchester returning from Syria, evading MI5 and leaving a "little something" in the tube in London doesn't count?

Yes, there is some highly purified BS being peddled here, and you're supplying it. The damage isn't "embarrassment" but rather blinded, now useless intelligence systems, and blueprints to infrastructure and practices to adversaries and enemies that they can exploit for their purposes, including avoiding detection. You don't know what you are talking about.

yesterday
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Tor Blacklisting Exit Nodes Vulnerable To Heartbleed

cold fjord Re:So much for Net Neutrality. (56 comments)

Your post is a tribute to misunderstanding (or trolling?) and bad moderation. There are detrimental effects from Snowden's leaks. I don't know how you think I said there wasn't.* It is entirely logical that they are spending money to repair the damage caused Snowden's leaks. The mess was caused by Snowden, and you are paying for the clean up. The US will be vulnerable for years or decades to come.

* Well, maybe I do know how you managed to achieve such a "misunderstanding" based on your sig: Fanboy .... Ron Paul.

yesterday
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Tor Blacklisting Exit Nodes Vulnerable To Heartbleed

cold fjord Re:So much for Net Neutrality. (56 comments)

The only reason that they have the money to spend is because they made a case to Congress, demonstrated the damage, and had their appropriation increased to recover from the damage. They don't get to spend whatever money they want to "just because."

The "many benefits" you see are only the places you look in your narrow view. You aren't looking anywhere near the national security landscape, only the "security landscape" comprised of internet programmers and activists. You avert your eyes from the real damage and see what you choose to. Your view is uninformed and stunted.

yesterday
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

cold fjord Re:But what is a militia? (1574 comments)

The militia laws reflect potential military requirements not social engineering goals. So yes, there are reasons for it, good ones. You could get a hint about some of that if you search your memory for the number of female infantry regiments in the service of Russia or Ukraine at present. I'm pretty sure the number will be close to zero.

By the way, that reply you made to me about Castro not being a communist at the beginning is essentially irrelevant. Castro apparently spoke out against capitalism and for collectivization while in school. After school he used his legal training to defend communists. He also took part in revolutionary activities overseas years before he did in Cuba. This was all before Batista returned to power, and before he met up with Guevara. He may not have been a communist by membership, but the handwriting was on the wall.

yesterday

Submissions

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Sexually Transmitted Virus Sterilizes Insects While Encouraging Mating

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about three weeks ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "National Geographic reports, "Why would a sterile male cricket mate with an infertile female? On the surface, this behaviour makes no sense: sex takes energy and effort, and there’s nothing in it for either of these partners. Neither one can foster the next generation. Shelley Adamo from Dalhousie University has the answer. Her team have shown that one particular insect virus can sterilise crickets, but also change their behaviour so they continue to mate with each other. By doing so, they pass the virus on to uninfected hosts. This virus is the latest example of parasitic mind control ... Scientists have now documented hundreds of such manipulators." — TED2014 Video"
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Data-Stealing Snoopy Drone Unveiled At Black Hat

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about three weeks ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "BBC reports, "Security firm SensePost has unveiled its Snoopy drone, which can steal data from unsuspecting smartphone users, at the Black Hat security conference in Singapore. The drone uses the company's software, which is installed on a computer attached to a drone. That code can be used to hack smartphones and steal personal data — all without a user's knowledge." — Ars Technica reports, "The researchers behind an earlier version of Snoopy that tracked only Wi-Fi signals have already used it to track more than 42,000 unique devices during a single 14-hour experiment in 2012 at the King's Cross train station in London. ... Snoopy has a creepy ability to collect a dizzying array of data, such as unique device IDs, including their changing locations, the Wi-Fi access points the devices hail, and unencrypted data carried in their radio signals. Once the data is collected and stockpiled, virtually all of it can cross-referenced to reveal key details about the users, including their employers and friends, and possibly names and addresses. To make it easier to find relationships, the data can be visualized using Maltego or similar software. "What's nice is this pulls all the data together and allows you to explore it over time," Wilkinson said."
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The 3D Economy - What happens when everyone prints their own shoes?

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about three weeks ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "From Reason: "Last May, Cody Wilson produced an ingeniously brief but nuanced manifesto about individual liberty in the age of the ever-encroaching techno-state-a single shot fired by a plastic pistol fabricated on a leased 3D printer. While Wilson dubbed his gun The Liberator, his interests and concerns are broader than merely protecting the Second Amendment. ... Wilson is ultimately aiming for the "transcendence of the state." And yet because of the nature of his invention, many observers reacted to his message as reductively as can be: "OMG, guns!" ... But if armies of Davids really want to transcend the state, there are even stronger weapons at their disposal: toothbrush holders, wall vases, bottle openers, shower caddies, and tape dispensers. ... Imagine what will happen when millions of people start using the tools that produced The Liberator to make, copy, swap, barter, buy, and sell all the quotidian stuff with which they furnish their lives. Rest in peace, Bed, Bath & Beyond. Thanks for all the stuff, Foxconn, but we get our gadgets from Pirate Bay and MEGA now. Once the retail and manufacturing carnage starts to scale, the government carnage will soon follow. How can it not, when only old people pay sales tax, fewer citizens obtain their incomes from traditional easy-to-tax jobs, and large corporate taxpayers start folding like daily newspapers? Without big business, big government can't function.""
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Survey Finds Nearly 50% in US Believe in Medical Conspiracy Theories

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 1 month ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "NY Daily News reports, "About half of American adults believe in at least one medical conspiracy theory, according to new survey results. (paywalled, first page viewable) Some conspiracy theories have much more traction than others ... three times as many people believe U.S. regulators prevent people from getting natural cures as believe that a U.S. spy agency infected a large number of African Americans with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). J. Eric Oliver, the study's lead author from University of Chicago, said people may believe in conspiracy theories because they're easier to understand than complex medical information. ... Some 49 percent of the survey participants agreed with at least one of the conspiracies. In fact, in addition to the 37 percent of respondents who fully agreed that U.S. regulators are suppressing access to natural cures, less than a third were willing to say they actively disagreed with the theory." — One of the conspiracy theories, that the US created the AIDs virus, was created for an active disinformation campaign by the Soviet Union against the US as a form of political warfare during the Cold War, and still gets repeated."
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Deeper Insights Into The Prisoner's Dilemma

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The American Scientist reports, "Prisoner’s Dilemma has been a subject of inquiry for more than 60 years, not just by game theorists but also by psychologists, economists, political scientists, and evolutionary biologists. Yet the game has not given up all its secrets. A startling discovery last year revealed a whole new class of strategies, including some bizarre ones. For example, over a long series of games one player can unilaterally dictate the other player’s score (within a certain range). Or a crafty player can control the ratio of the two scores. But not all the new strategies are so manipulative; some are “generous” rules that elicit cooperation and thereby excel in an evolutionary context.""
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The Earth May Have Twice As Much Water As Previously Thought

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "CBC reports, "A dirty, $10 diamond with a prize inside has helped reveal that there are vast quantities of water stored deep inside the Earth. The diamond formed in the "transition zone" around 410 to 660 kilometres below our planet's surface. Analysis of a mineral grain trapped inside it suggests that it came from surroundings that were about one per cent water, report researchers led by University of Alberta geochemist Graham Pearson. They published their findings online in the journal Nature today. (abstract) If the sample is representative of that part of the deep Earth, the amount of water there could be "about the same as the mass of all the world’s oceans combined," wrote Hans Keppler, a geophysicist at the University of Bayreuth ... That, in turn, changes our understanding of the way water cycles through our planet, and has implications for the way tectonic plates and volcanoes behave, Pearson notes.""
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Turing's Theory Of Chemical Morphogenesis Validated 60 Years After His Death

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Phys.org reports, "Alan Turing's accomplishments in computer science are well known, but lesser known is his impact on biology and chemistry. In his only paper on biology (abstract), Turing proposed a theory of morphogenesis, or how identical copies of a single cell differentiate, for example, into an organism with arms and legs, a head and tail. Now, 60 years after Turing's death, researchers from Brandeis University and the University of Pittsburgh have provided the first experimental evidence that validates Turing's theory in cell-like structures. The team published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, March 10.""
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Massachusetts Court Says 'Upskirt' Photos Are Legal

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month and a half ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "CNN reports, "Massachusetts' highest court ruled Wednesday that it is not illegal to secretly photograph underneath a person's clothing — a practice known as "upskirting" — prompting one prosecutor to call for a revision of state law. The high court ruled that the practice did not violate the law because the women who were photographed while riding Boston public transportation were not nude or partially nude.""
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Strange State of Matter Found For First Time In Biological System

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month and a half ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Live Science reports, "Never before seen in biology, a state of matter called "disordered hyperuniformity" has been discovered in the eye of a chicken. This arrangement of particles appears disorganized over small distances but has a hidden order that allows material to behave like both a crystal and a liquid. ... Researchers say this may be the first time disordered hyperuniformity has been observed in a biological system; previously it had only been seen in physical systems like liquid helium and simple plasmas." — More at Princeton."
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Russia admits that it has moved troops in Ukraine

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Telegraph reports, "Russian troops have moved into Crimea in what Moscow is calling a mission to “protect Black Sea Fleet’s positions” but which the Ukrainian government has denounced as an “armed intervention.” The Russian foreign ministry said Friday that it had informed the Ukrainian government that armoured units from the Black Sea Fleet base near Sevastopol had entered Crimea in order to protect fleet positions. “The Ukrainian side was also passed a note regarding the movement of armoured vehicles of the Russian Black Sea Fleet in Crimea, which is happening in full accordance with the foundation Russian-Ukrainian agreement on the Black Sea Fleet,” the ministry said in a statement posted on its website on Friday afternoon. In the same note the Russian foreign ministry said it had declined a Ukrainian request for “bilateral consultations” on events in Crimea because they are “the result of recent internal political processes in Ukraine.” " — Fox News reports, "The United States warned Russia it would be a "grave mistake" to intervene militarily in Ukraine, as the Kremlin ordered 150,000 troops to test their combat readiness and armed men seized government buildings in Ukraine's Crimea region and raised a Russian flag over a barricade." — USA Today reports Former Ukrainian President Yanukovych has surfaced in Moscow after fleeing the country and being removed by parliament."
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Researchers Have Developed Technique To Create Self-Organizing Drone Swarms

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Register reports, "Researchers have taught flying drones to behave like birds, clearing the way for further development of technologies to marshal swarms of unmanned aerial vehicles. In a paper titled Outdoor flocking and formation flight with autonomous aerial robots boffins from Budapet's Eötvös University Department of Biological Physics describe how they have been able to teach quadcopters to flock – an approach that lets them work like swarms of birds, traveling in a self-adjusting, self-stabilizing fleet that doesn't need to communicate back to a central controller." — More at Nature."
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The challenge of the modern scientist is to avoid career suicide

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "From The Conversation, " .... the all-consuming nature of code development means that an individual researcher may not uncover ... major scientific results, missing out on the publications and citations that are the currency of modern science. Other researchers, those that just use rather than develop such codes, are able to reap the rewards, and this better paves their way into an academic career. The rewards go to those that seek to answer the questions, not those that make it happen. With fewer publications under their belt, those that develop the tools needed by the scientific community find themselves pushed ... out of academia. Some senior academics recognise this path to career suicide, and young researchers are steered into projects with a more stable future ... But we are then faced with a growing challenge on who will develop the necessary tools for Big Science to continue to flourish.""
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Google ordered to remove anti-Islamic film from YouTube

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The NY Daily News reports, "A federal judge ordered Wednesday that YouTube must take down a film blamed by the Obama administration for sparking the deadly September 2012 protests at the American embassy in Benghazi, Libya. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ordered the video hosting site to yank the controversial 14-minute film, “Innocence of Muslims.”" ... The ruling addressed only the copyright issue, not the film's content, which YouTube has contended did not violate its terms of service." — Techdirt has some extensive commentary on the ruling and issue worth reading. It seems likely there will be an appeal, with the distinct possibility that Google and the MPAA will be on the same side."
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Supreme Court Ruling Expands Police Authority In Home Searches

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The LA Times reports, "Police officers may enter and search a home without a warrant as long as one occupant consents, even if another resident has previously objected, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday ... The 6-3 ruling ... gives authorities more leeway to search homes without obtaining a warrant, even when there is no emergency. The majority ... said police need not take the time to get a magistrate's approval before entering a home in such cases. But dissenters ... warned that the decision would erode protections against warrantless home searches. ... The case began when LAPD officers responded to reports of a street robbery ... They pursued a suspect to an apartment building, heard shouting inside a unit and knocked on the door. Roxanne Rojas opened the door, but her boyfriend, Walter Fernandez, told officers they could not enter without a warrant. ... Fernandez was arrested in connection with the street robbery and taken away. An hour later, police returned and searched his apartment, this time with Rojas' consent. They found a shotgun and gang-related material.""
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Spy Chief James Clapper: We Can't Stop Another Snowden

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Daily Beast reports, "Snowden pilfered documents from databases designed to share intelligence more broadly within the government. Promoting this integration of secrets is the primary mission of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). The office was created on the recommendation of the 9/11 Commission that faulted the intelligence agencies for jealously guarding information that could have prevented the attacks of that day. Clapper and his predecessors were supposed to help transform the intelligence community’s “need to know” culture to one of “need to share.” Snowden (and Chelsea Manning before him) were able to exploit the reforms ... the very human nature of the bureaucracy he controls virtually insures that more mass disclosures are inevitable. “In the end,” he says, “we will never ever be able to guarantee that there will not be an Edward Snowden or another Chelsea Manning because this is a large enterprise composed of human beings with all their idiosyncrasies.”""
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The Science Of Social Participation: Twitter Conversations Have 6 Basic Types

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about a month ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "PBS reports, "The Pew Research Center and the Social Media Research Foundation analyzed thousands of twitter conversations going back to 2010. They found these conversations occoured based on the structure of the individual’s Twitter network. For example, the subjects and content that a person tweets about, the people they follow, the people who follow them and the way they network creates a structure of social activity. In a recently released report Pew reports that they uncovered six distinct patterns for these structures. “These are data-driven early steps in understanding Twitter discussion structures that contribute to the emerging science of social participation,” Ben Shneiderman professor of computer science at the University of Maryland ... “This new field is emerging right before our eyes and could eventually have a large impact on our understanding of everything from health to community safety, from business innovation to citizen science and from civic engagement to sustainable energy programs.” ... “These maps provide insights into people’s behavior in a way that complements and expands on traditional research methods ... """
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NSA Exploring Options For Relinquishing Telephone Record Metadata

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Washington Post reports, "The National Security Agency has been exploring options for relinquishing its massive database of telephone records ... The agency was expected to deliver to the White House this week some proposals for storing the data outside of government hands — a goal President Obama announced in January to ease concerns about potential NSA abuse ... “At the end of the day, this is going to be a policy decision, with legal implementation,” said NSA Deputy Director Rick Ledgett in a recent interview, noting that the NSA does not make policy or law. “But what we’re doing, along with the [FBI], is advising on the parameters that would make the program valuable.” ... “This program,” Ledgett said, “has to be useful to the FBI.” The NSA collects data on phone calls, but not actual call content ... Earlier this month, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence solicited ideas from industry ... Obama directed the director of national intelligence and the attorney general to develop options by March 28." — Director of National Intelligence James Clapper has recently stated that it would have been better if the government had been up front and open with the American people about the metadata program."
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'DOOM' Beta Will Be Pre-Order Bonus For 'Wolfenstein: The New Order'

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "Brace yourself the beta, the Doom beta. Gamespot reports, "Remember Doom 4? It's not dead! And it's now just called Doom, presumably. And there's going to be a beta. Anyone who preorders a copy of upcoming Wolfenstein: The New Order will gain access to the Doom beta. But Bethesda isn't saying when that beta might be. Or what platforms it will be on. It is saying, however, that you'll need to be over 18 to participate. Sounds like it might be a bit gory, then. More information can be found on Bethesda's Doom beta site." Forbes reports, "Wolfenstein: The New Order will launch on May 20th""
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Hacking Of US Navy Extensive, Repair Cost $10M And 4 Months. Upgrades Needed

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Australian reports, "Iran's infiltration of a US Navy computer network was far more extensive than previously thought ... hackers targeted the ... network used by ... the Navy to host websites, store non-sensitive information and handle voice, video and data communications. The network has 800,000 users ... “It was a real big deal,” said the senior US official. “It was a significant penetration ...” ... the penetration allowed the Iranians to conduct surveillance on the Navy’s and Marine Corps’ unclassified networks ... the cost to repair the Navy network ... was approximately $US10 million. ... The attack and other cyberthreats prompted a broader review of Navy and DoD network security and upgrades ... were needed. The added defences are expected to cost several hundred million dollars ... within three weeks of the intrusion, officials understood the full scope of the attack and put in place a plan to try and push the intruders out. ... the unclassified network was taken down twice for upgrades ... officials were surprised at the skills of the Iranian hackers. Previously, their tactics had been far cruder ... denial of service attacks ..." — Also at Fox News."
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US Intelligence Chief Clapper: We Should've Told You We Track Your Calls

cold fjord cold fjord writes  |  about 2 months ago

cold fjord (826450) writes "The Daily Beast reports, "In an exclusive interview ... Clapper said the problems facing the U.S. intelligence community over its collection of phone records could have been avoided. “... Had we been transparent about this from the outset right after 9/11 ... and said both to the American people and to their elected representatives, we need to cover this gap, we need to make sure this never happens to us again, so here is what we are going to set up, here is how it’s going to work, and why we have to do it, and here are the safeguards We wouldn’t have had the problem we had,” Clapper said. “What did us in here ... was this shocking revelation,” he said, referring to the first disclosures from Snowden. If the program had been publicly introduced ... most Americans would probably have supported it. “I don’t think it would be of any greater concern to most Americans than fingerprints. ... ” ... Clapper still defends the 215 program ... The storage of the phone records allows NSA analysts to connect phone numbers of suspected terrorists overseas to a possible network inside the United States. Other U.S. intelligence officials say its real value is that it saves work for the FBI and the NSA ... “For me it was not some massive assault on civil liberties and privacy because of what we actually do and the safeguards that are put on this,” he said. “To guard against perhaps these days low probability but a very (high) impact thing if it happens.” Clapper compared the 215 program to fire insurance.""
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