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MIT Designs Tsunami Proof Floating Nuclear Reactor

confused one Re:Rock From Outer Space (208 comments)

Yeah.... about that. It won't matter much where the reactor is located if "a giant rock or snowball from outerspace hits..." and creates a tsunami. You think Fukushima was bad, wait till the giant tsunami you speak of inundates coastlines across three or four continents.

yesterday
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MIT Designs Tsunami Proof Floating Nuclear Reactor

confused one TMI (208 comments)

Who told you that lie? Several reactors have suffered a melt down / loss of primary containment event where fuel slumped to the bottom of the pressure vessel and burned through. TMI is an example of such an event. This was always a possibility in Generation II PWR and BWR designs. It's one of the reasons we need to be building Generation III+ replacements.

yesterday
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MIT Designs Tsunami Proof Floating Nuclear Reactor

confused one Re:Couple problems (208 comments)

There was a drawing visible in the video for about 10-15 seconds. Mind you, it's not a lot to go on... The reactor itself was shown below the water level. The design appeared to be similar to designs I've seen which use passive convection cooling. In addition to that, the outer containment was labeled as "flooded with sea water" or something to that effect. To your other point, the shape of the outer containment was a cylinder. The appearance was similar to some Generation III+ designs that flood the building and rely on passive convection cooling to keep a reactor nominally within safe limits, should something serious go wrong with the primary and secondary systems. Again, that's based on a 10 second glimpse at a sketch in a video... so not to be taken seriously.

yesterday
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Mercedes Pooh-Poohs Tesla, Says It Has "Limited Potential"

confused one Re:Wait a second... (337 comments)

Mercedes isn't in financial trouble, not at all; and, Tesla is not going to have any measurable impact on Mercedes sales. That's not what I'm referring to. The curtain is hiding the fact that Mercedes themselves are using Tesla technology.

yesterday
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Mercedes Pooh-Poohs Tesla, Says It Has "Limited Potential"

confused one Re:Wait a second... (337 comments)

yes, yes they did. Mercedes released a Euro B-class car using a drive train jointly developed by and supplied by Tesla. In addition, Mercedes is reported to be buying batteries for other projects from Tesla. Me thinks the Mercedes salesman is trying to protect his sales numbers and trying too hard to not look behind the curtain.

2 days ago
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The Squishy Future of Robotics

confused one Re:attacked by a pillow (36 comments)

I do... I've seen large industrial machines that use what are essentially soft robotics techniques and soft manipulators. The examples given in the article are all small and target search and rescue apps. That's great. I've seen a 4 story structure lifted on airbags and moved across a smooth surface by an automated system. Point was you can't assume it scales to industrial scales and assume everything will be soft and harmless. When the "soft" robotics moves up to the larger scales, as it is just as likely to do as it is to move to smaller scales, you can't discount the energy involved. I hate to see someone make the assumption "They're soft so they're harmless" and let that idea get promoted as gospel regardless of scale.

2 days ago
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The Squishy Future of Robotics

confused one Re:attacked by a pillow (36 comments)

Funny you should mention that. I happen to be an engineer working in a manufacturing plant. Absolutely safe... No. As safe as we can make them, yes. We put all kinds of safeties like light curtains into the systems, to protect human workers. The summary above says they are meant to work "cage free" and the worst that could happen is... Well, they're working with small scale and underestimating the damage potential. That's all I'm saying.

2 days ago
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'Thermoelectrics' Could One Day Power Cars

confused one Re:power cars? technically no (172 comments)

damn /. parser. What I meant is 60 less than 600 (parser stripped the symbol)

2 days ago
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'Thermoelectrics' Could One Day Power Cars

confused one Re:power cars? technically no (172 comments)

In your 60600 analysis you're forgetting the shielding and cooling requirements.

2 days ago
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The Squishy Future of Robotics

confused one attacked by a pillow (36 comments)

Sure.... attacked by a 500 lb Kevlar reinforced pillow that can wrap around a body and sqeeze it until it pops like a zit.

OK, some of the search and rescue applications using the soft robots are a great idea; and, robots, in general, are useful tools. But a robot is a machine. Machines break. Computers malfunction. A small S&R robot has a small but measurable risk profile. If it's in a med-surgical application then it has the ability to do damage to the body of either the patient or the attending medical staff, should it malfunction. If it can perform industrial tasks, like lifting a car, then it can equally as well crush a person. One cannot say, "Look, it's soft and squishy" and ignore safety factors.

2 days ago
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Reviving a Commodore 64 Computer Using a Raspberry Pi

confused one Re:old tech (165 comments)

Yeah, I'm aware of the isobutane and isopropane blends. Problem is that the Chevy's from the '60's and early '70's use a POA valve to regulate the system. Rather than cycle the compressor, the compressor runs 100% of the time and the system is regulated by a pressure control valve (the POA). The valve is pre-set for a pressure set point based on an R-12 curve. You have to adjust the valve to match the curve of the refrigerant. Said valve is not externally adjustable. Once you're in there, it's just as easy to convert the system to R-143. For what it's worth, I've already pulled the entire front of the truck apart. Everything forward of the firewall is currently off the truck; Doing a full overhaul of brakes, suspension, steering, drivetrain and body rust remediation. So, I'm at a point of converting it anyway.

3 days ago
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Reviving a Commodore 64 Computer Using a Raspberry Pi

confused one Re:old tech (165 comments)

See, this is where it goes all sideways.

I have a 44 year old truck. I get the collecting cars thing. I understand the collecting old guns thing. I get the being creative and building your own furniture thing. But he's not collecting old computers and keeping them alive. He's making a copy of the old machine using a new one, that acts somewhat like (but will never behave exactly like) the old one. The guy's creating yet another emulator using an ARM processor board.

Car analogy again: my truck has the original engine castings. It's basically an 1970 LT1 engine, tuned for truck use, which makes it doubly cool; but, it's still the original castings. It's still carbureted. It still has the mechanical voltage regulator. It's as original as I can make it, reasonably speaking (the A/C may need to be upgraded because R-12 is damned hard to find and expensive). If he wanted to do it right, he'd start with an actual C64 or at least with a 6510 processor, which might require he make one...

4 days ago
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Reviving a Commodore 64 Computer Using a Raspberry Pi

confused one why (165 comments)

OK, I learned on the Apple ][, PET, VIC-20 (all 6502's) and a C64 (6510) as well... I also owned a Tandy CoCo (6809). And I remember how things were back then... But what's the point of all this nostalgic development effort to recreate the old machine, again? Hell, there are emulators that run on Linux that would work fine on the Raspberry Pi. Unless you're trying to recover some fundamentally necessary data or program, I just don't see the point. Move on man... Move on.

4 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Are You Apocalypse-Useful?

confused one Re:Some of the oldest trades become useful. (731 comments)

Go back and look at history... People fighting with flint-locks and percussion cap black powder muzzle-loaders often had to resort to the sword (or the bayonet) once the enemy was within a few feet. You just don't have time to reload...

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Are You Apocalypse-Useful?

confused one Re:Most developers are pretty smart people (731 comments)

Intelligence is part of it. Immediately after the "event" that results in an apocalypse, skills you currently possess will be the ones that help you survive. Being intelligent means you can learn new skills, once you have the time; but, first you have to survive.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Are You Apocalypse-Useful?

confused one Re:most useful (731 comments)

I missed something that others have mentioned... People need water, food, shelter, warm clothing... Meeting those basic needs will be the first and foremost in importance. I missed clothing. Anyone with knitting, weaving and sewing skills will be important to post apocalyptic survival. the scientists and engineers will only be important initially in support of meeting those needs; the rest follows later (building and fixing things).

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Are You Apocalypse-Useful?

confused one most useful (731 comments)

post apocalypse, the most important profession is going to be farmer. People got to eat. Skilled trades will be in demand, post apocalypse as before: carpenters, bricklayers and blacksmiths, for example. People need shelter and safety. After that, scientists or engineers who can make things happen, build things, fix things...

about a week ago
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GM Names Names, Suspends Two Engineers Over Ignition-Switch Safety

confused one Re:changing part without changing number is common (236 comments)

Since I work for an automotive OEM.... When this is done, there is an Engineering Change Order documenting the change and why it was implemented. We don't change anything without first getting the approval of the customer; and, invariably they will want all the relevant DV and PV testing redone. Huge effort and pain. All of this is well documented and nothing ships until we have final approval from the customer.

The part number may not change; but, the part revision level will. PN 123456 RevA will become PN 123456 RevB. We treat it as the "same" part number but will only ship the latest revision once we have customer approval. As for tracking, I don't know how our customers tracks the change internally; but, I can tell you which batch, serial number, and date code the new revision started shipping.

about a week ago

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