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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek.com has a piece on China's efforts in the wireless network. It has held out for some time and seems at this point far behind Japen and Seoul. The question remains, will their TD-SCDMA be ready in time for the 2008 Olympic and will it surpass other Asian countries? From the article: "Showtime is finally nearing for the standard, TD-SCDMA, or time division synchronous code division multiple access. It has been billed as a sign of China's growing technological sophistication, and China's Ministry of Information Industry is expected to hand out licenses early next year so that providers and handset vendors will be fully operational by the 2008 Beijing Olympics.""
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek has an article based on iSupply's teardown of the PS3. The conlusion: Sony is losing $240 on the 60GB console, and over $300 on the 20GB one. From the article: The most expensive component inside the PS3 is the Reality Synthesizer graphics chip from Nvidia, which adds about $129 to the manufacturing cost. Behind that is Sony's own Blu-ray drive, which goes for $125, then the Cell processor, which Sony designed in partnership with IBM and Toshiba , at $89 a chip."
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "Video blogger Amanda Congdon is the latest "cewebrity" to jump to mainstream media. BusinessWeek is reporting that "Congdon will regularly appear on the network's 24-hour digital channel ABC News Now and occasionally appear as a correspondent on the network's TV news broadcasts. She will also host a weekly video blog, or "vlog," on abcnews.com focusing on topics such as new media, politics, and the environment.""
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek has an an article on the possible negative consequences to the security of the U.S. brought by the offshoring of computer hardware and sofware. From the article: "As combat becomes increasingly high-tech, Pentagon officials worry that "accidental defects" or "maliciously placed code" buried within a computer program could compromise the security of the Defense Dept. network and, ultimately, hurt its ability to fight wars, says Pentagon spokesman Maj. Patrick Ryder.""
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek has a story on how fantasy sports has grown well beyond Football and Baseball. It looks at 10 sites, that offer anything from Fantasy Waterskiing to Fantasy Chess. From the article: Many of the sites appeal to people who may not be interested in the traditional sports so well represented by fantasy leagues, but who still crave the competition of online game-play. The Tabloid Fantasy League & Fantasy Fashion League, for instance, award points to players based on the how much buzz their favorite celebrities generate."
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek has a feature recapping the rise to stardom of the iPod over the past 5 years, as well as a gallery of the main events in iPod and iTune's history. From the article: "Apple has sold nearly 68 million iPods, generating about $14 billion in sales. And if previous holiday seasons are any indicator of future results, Apple could record the sale on its 100 millionth iPod before the end of the calendar year.""
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conq conq writes  |  more than 6 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek has a gallery on the history of console wars. Starting with the 1972 Magnavox Odyssey, all the way to the 2006 Wii. The details on the Magnavox Odyssey: "This is where it all began. Game guru Ralph Baer's invention for Magnavox brought video gaming out of the arcades and into the living room. As the first home video game console, the Odyssey had no audio output and could only display black and white images. But the system came with translucent TV screen overlays to simulate full-color graphics in games like tennis and hockey. The Odyssey's sales were less than impressive: Magnavox had sold about 350,000 units by 1975.""
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "One has to ask how long is Microsof willing to stick with the money losing XBox? In an interview with Microsoft's COO Kevin Turner he exaplains: "It's very hard to calculate the worth of a defensive business. I personally think Sony will have a really hard time with the PS3 — fewer games at launch, $200 price premium, and yet they're losing more money per console than Microsoft is on the 360. More long-term, imagine no PlayStation 4 and how Microsoft might profit from such an environment.""
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek has an article on some potential complications in the Google/MySpace deal. From the article: "The main point of potential conflict is the millions of YouTube videos that are embedded on the profiles of MySpace users. Google is expected to integrate advertising into YouTube videos produced by professionals and amateurs alike. As a result, Google could soon have the ability to stream ads to MySpace users who are viewing YouTube videos embedded onto their MySpace pages. The question is whether News Corp. will get a slice of that revenue, and if so, how much.""
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek reports that Baidu.com is being sued, and more(!) for click fraud in China. From the article: Other Chinese advertisers are also getting fed up and taking more drastic action. Dr. Liu Wenhua is the director of the Beijing Zhongbei Cancer Medical Research Center. In August he led a small demonstration in front of Baidu's headquarters in the capital, protesting alleged click fraud."
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek has a piece on social networking sites for kids. Club Penguin is one such site that aims to attrack 8-12 year olds. From the article: `I bought a flat-screen TV and a stereo system!" shouts my nine-year-old son, Lee, as he shakes me awake one morning. For a kid who typically needs to be dragged out of bed, this is curious behavior. I'm worried. Did Lee get hold of my credit card and go on some QVC binge? "Nooooo, Mom," he says. He quickly explains that the TV and the stereo are virtual."
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek has a piece on click fraud. It includes the record of a phone call the reporter had with "Kiss" who opeartes many pay to click and parked site. "Reached by telephone, Kiss says that his registration name is false and declines to reveal the real one. He says he's the 23-year-old son of computer technicians and has studied finance. He owns about 20 paid-to-read sites, he says, as well as 200 parked sites stuffed with Google and Yahoo advertisements. But he says he will take down healthinsurancebids.com to avoid discovery. He claims to take in $70,000 in ad revenue a month, but says that only 10% of that comes from PTRs. The rest, he says, reflects legitimate clicks by real Web surfers. He refrains from more PTR activity, he claims, because "it's no good for advertisers, no good for Google, no good for Yahoo.""
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conq conq writes  |  more than 7 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek's Arik Hesseldahl reports on the estimated cost of production of the 4-GB iPod Nano. The conclusion: "iSuppli took apart the 4-GB version of the nano and estimated that the materials inside cost $72.24. That's a drop of more than $17 compared with what Apple paid for the guts of a 2-GB version of the first iPod nano device. The new 4-GB players come in four colors and sell for $199.""
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conq conq writes  |  about 8 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek takes an in-depth look at the man behind the Apple magic. Also, features a slideshow with all his designs (including one before he was with Apple). From the article: "During an internship with design consultancy Roberts Weaver Group, he created a pen that had a ball and clip mechanism on top, for no purpose other than to give the owner something to fiddle with. "It immediately became the owner's prize possession, something you always wanted to play with," recalls Grinyer, a Roberts Weaver staffer at the time. "We began to call it 'having Jony-ness,' an extra something that would tap into the product's underlying emotion.""
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conq conq writes  |  about 8 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek has a Q&A with the CEO of Palm, Ed Colligan. When asked how Palm differentiates itself from Nokia, Rim... Colligan's reply: "Our entire history has been making products that people love to use. And when people use these products they say things like "I can't live without it — it's my brain!" They talk about it like it's a pet. There are a lot of handset companies who have tried to make products and do these kinds of applications really well but they don't do a very good job. Palm makes better products than anybody else in the mobile-computing element of this marketplace.""
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conq conq writes  |  about 8 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek.com reports that News Corp. is acquiring the Jamba mobile entertainment business. From the article: "On Sept. 12, News Corp. said it would acquire 51% of Jamba from Internet security company VeriSign. Like News Corp.'s earlier bets, this one offers both ample opportunity and risk. Jamba is best known for marketing the Crazy Frog ringtone for wireless phones. Crazy Frog was wildly popular in 2005, but Jamba's revenues crashed as customers and regulators in Europe balked at subscription fees that confused many users.""
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conq conq writes  |  about 8 years ago

conq (915384) writes "BusinessWeek has an article on how the Dell recalls show the true power of the web and how the web's attack on the Dell batteries evolved on the web. From the article: But in cyberspace the race was on to dig out every last byte of "truth" about those flaming PCs. Gadget news blogs like Gizmodo and Engadget spat out facts and rumors with equal zeal. They were relentless advocates for the consumer, too. On July 31, Engadget posted photos of a Dell notebook that had caught fire in Singapore. Its comment: "We'll keep posting these until we see a recall or a solution, so please, Dell, treat 'em right.""
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conq conq writes  |  about 8 years ago

conq writes "BusinessWeek has opened its voting for the "Best of the Web". The five tech news sites they highlight are: CNET, Digg, GigaOM, Slashdot and Techme. Allowing users to vote for their favorite."
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conq conq writes  |  about 8 years ago

conq writes "BusinessWeek has an article on some cool phones of the future. On of teh phones featured: "One outfit, Switzerland-based GoldVish, will debut its mobiles for the über-rich on Sept. 1 at the Millionaire Fair, a lavish event showcasing luxury goods like Rolls-Royce cars. GoldVish's cell phones were created by Emmanuel Gueit, a watch and jewelry designer whose credits include items for Harry Winston. The phones start at $24,500 and go to $1.26 million apiece.""
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conq conq writes  |  more than 8 years ago

conq writes "BusinessWeek.com has a piece on how video games are being designed with health-related application. Fromt the article: "A stopwatch and a tub of frigid ice water are the standard tools medical researchers use to test pain tolerance. How long can a person keep his arm submerged? In an unusual project, last year researchers at the University of Maryland's medical center used the arm-in-ice water test to evaluate a new video game called Free Dive. The researchers found that their subjects — 60 children, ranging in age from 5 to 12 — were able to keep an arm submerged for about 19 seconds on average. If, however, they simultaneously played Free Dive on a PC with their dry hand, the kids could tolerate an average of 86 seconds in the icy liquid — an increase of more than 400%.""

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