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Comments

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USAF Almost Nuked North Carolina In 1961 – Declassified Document

crazyeddie740 Re: old, really old, news (586 comments)

You're wrong, but there is admittedly more to it. In addition to forcing the Japanese to surrender, the bombs were used to keep the Soviets out. They were imminently prepared for a ground invasion by August, and the use of the weapons was authorized by the author of our first containment policy President Harry Truman.

I'm not so sure about that. By that point in the war, the USSR had the most powerful army in the world, but its navy sucked. Especially in the Pacific, since quite a few of its ships had been sent to reinforce the Baltic. I was poking around on some alternate history websites a month ago, and it looks like if the bomb hadn't been used, the Russians probably wouldn't have been able to invade Hokkaido until the spring of 1946. And, even then, Hokkaido is basically the Alaska of Japan. The Russians might have been able to help with the invasion of Honshu later in 1946, but, if so, they'd probably would have been doing it in American and Canadian vessels.

If we hadn't used the bomb, there wouldn't be too much "North Japan" to worry about (just Hokkaido, which, present day, only has a population of 5 million), but Korea might have been unified under the Communists.

about 10 months ago
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Birthday Song's Copyright Leads To a Lawsuit For the Ages

crazyeddie740 Re:Protecting the arts and artists (442 comments)

Corporate agency is actually a field of study in metaphysics. So, yeah, corporations can be said to have intentions, beliefs, and desires, and these propositional attitudes might not be shared by the individuals that constitute the corporation.

No walking down the streets naked, though. Which is probably a good thing, since I don't think the world is ready for Stanley Morgan in its birthday suit.

about a year ago
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North Korea Declares a State of War

crazyeddie740 Re:Nothing New (628 comments)

Your theory would be a lot more plausible if the history books showed any indication that the Americans even knew where Korea was before the Korean War. The partition between North and South happened because the USSR declared war on Japan at the very end of WWII. The Americans took a look at the map for a good five minutes, and then proposed the split just to keep Russia from claiming the whole thing. Stalin, who was more concerned about Eastern Europe, agreed.

Ironically, the South was more agrarian, and had a existing Communist movement; and the North was relatively industralized and more pro-Western. Both sides of the partition were put under dictators since the Koreans on both sides of the divide weren't exactly happy with their new imperial overlords. South Korea finally became democratic at the end of the '80s.

There is a theory that one of the causes of the Korean War was Truman having a brain-fart during a speech, and left it off the list of places America would protect if they were attacked by the Commies. Not entirely his fault, since South Korea was a long way away from being the economic powerhouse it is today.

Sure, the current situation isn't the fault of the North Korean *people*. I'd put the blame on the North Korean *government*, the usual nasty-ass Cold War leftovers, and, as in all things, a heaping helping of Hanlon's Razor.

about a year ago
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New Mexico Spaceport Nearly Ready For Business

crazyeddie740 Re:What a stupid summary... (96 comments)

Ohh, St. Reagan's Voodoo Economics, peace be upon him. Listen, mate, the US have a wealth disparity that is about the level of a third world banana republic. Nothing is trickling down, except the rich pissing on the rest.

Voodoo Economics don't work because the rich have a lower Marginal Propensity to Consume - they tend to spend a smaller proportion and save a larger proportion of their income than the poor. Here, we have something that might convince the rich to actually cough up some of their dough instead of just sitting on it. That should help both the economy and us, the poor.

more than 2 years ago
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UN Names N. Korea Chair of Disarmament Committee

crazyeddie740 Re:Alternate Headline: North Korea is in the UN (182 comments)

How is shunning the country going to help to encourage them to become better members of the world community? If you stop listening to any group of people then it causes resentment to fester.

I'd feel better about that if thought the DPRK's ambassador represented a people instead of just an illegitimate government. I don't have a lot of hope for the DPRK peacefully reforming. I'd like to be proven wrong, mind.

about 3 years ago
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Fired IT Worker Replaces CEO's Presentation With Porn

crazyeddie740 Re:Awesome (316 comments)

He's a 52 year old IT manager who was fired. He probably didn't have a good chance of getting a new job (in IT at least) anyway.

more than 3 years ago
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Interpol Wants a Global Identity Card System

crazyeddie740 Re:One world government (349 comments)

Sure, Marx and Engels were revolutionaries, but the governments they were fighting against were about like the current government of Iran.

more than 3 years ago
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Interpol Wants a Global Identity Card System

crazyeddie740 Re:One world government (349 comments)

The point is that that wouldn't have happened if the government had stepped in. Voluntary donations are better all around. People feel better about giving them than taxes, they usually give more, and those receiving it are more grateful.

Why wouldn't it have happened if the government stepped in? Does government intervention rule out private charity? What makes you think that people *usually* give more in such a vacuum, and the case you cite isn't just a fluke? There is plenty of unmet needs out there right now, and I don't see private charities stepping up to the plate.

more than 3 years ago
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Interpol Wants a Global Identity Card System

crazyeddie740 Re:One world government (349 comments)

Medical care is a limited resource and it is impossible to treat EVERYBODY as if they are all of unlimited worth. [...] Getting back on topic, the question at had isn't if somebody who needs medical care should or should not be treated, but if the system is one of central planning with a central bureaucracy literally allocating the decision of your life or death, or if perhaps a less centralized system ought to be put into place that preserves personal liberties. For myself, I strongly distrust central planning groups because they almost never have my interests and needs in mind, or for that matter even care if I live or die.

You're right that we can't expend infinite resources on a single individual, but I would think that universal health care systems would tend to use a triage system rather than a hard cutoff. Also, public funded universal health care doesn't rule out private health care. If you don't like a central planning group (which, hopefully, would have some level of democratic oversight), then you're quite welcome to use your own money to buy health care on the open market. Universal health care would just make sure that everybody gets *some* level of protection vs. our current allocation system of "screw you, you're poor." It's not like universal health care would make private practices illegal, you know.

more than 3 years ago
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Interpol Wants a Global Identity Card System

crazyeddie740 Re:One world government (349 comments)

It looks more like the idea is to enable governments to see if random migrants are criminals, and maybe make it easier for migrants to cross borders. I don't see anything in TFA about access to socialized services. I suppose nations could handle that simply by issuing IDs to their own citizens - no need for a transnational ID system there, unless different nations want to work out some sort of exchange. TFA mentions something about this cutting down on corruption (by making it unnecessary to forge IDs saying that the migrant is a citizen?) and something about an electronic remittance system. Does anybody have more details on this? What is in it for the migrants? If I never leave my native member country, would I have to sign up for this system?

more than 3 years ago
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Interpol Wants a Global Identity Card System

crazyeddie740 Re:One world government (349 comments)

We're going to have to cut trillions from the budget just to break even and then to tack on another few trillion to pay for socialized medicine, we will need to cut from somewhere else.

Or, you know, we could RAISE TAXES! Or rather, undo the reckless tax cuts that the previous administration put in place.

more than 3 years ago
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Interpol Wants a Global Identity Card System

crazyeddie740 Re:One world government (349 comments)

Our American medical dollars might be stretching further if we did more *preventative* care. There's a lot of uninsured people who just wait until they have to go to the emergency room - and then don't pay the bill, raising the costs for people who *can* pay for health insurance. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, right? Also, I think lack of access to health insurance is a major driver of lawsuits. If you get hurt, you want somebody to pay for the bill, even if it is a bit of stretch to think it was their fault. Some level of socialized medicine would do a lot to make our economy more efficient. (I would prefer a public single-payer system to an individual mandate, though.)

more than 3 years ago
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Interpol Wants a Global Identity Card System

crazyeddie740 Re:One world government (349 comments)

Sorry to be horribly obvious, but money is just a way of allocating resources. If you want more education, then teachers are going to have to eat and will need a place to live. They need chalk, blackboards, paper, books, etc. That's resources that won't be going to doctors, or some other sector of the economy. If you use certain chemicals to make drugs, that's chemicals that aren't going to research. The only difference between raw capitalism and pure socialism is how our votes on resource allocation are weighted - under raw capitalism, the 'votes' of the rich are weighted, under socialism, our 'votes' are equal, at least in theory.

more than 3 years ago
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Former Truck Driver Reconstructs A-bomb

crazyeddie740 Re:whoa! (332 comments)

I don't think most people even care about their genes winning out. They care more about getting it on and maybe having kids. And for quite a few people, the second thing is just a side effect of the first thing. If everyone cared about their own genes, let alone their 'race,' then the Europeans wouldn't be 'losing' the population game, would they? It's not like there is some vast Muslim conspiracy to sterilize the Crusaders, is there. I might care about having kids myself, but why should I care about the fate of my 'race'? If my genes want to mingle with those from elsewhere, more power to them. Sounds more like a win-win than a loss. On the other hand, I *do* care about my kids living in a free society.

more than 3 years ago
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Former Truck Driver Reconstructs A-bomb

crazyeddie740 Re:The Jew view of Goyim/Gentiles (others) (332 comments)

Ironically, the neo-Nazi helps demonstrate my point. Assuming that the neo-Nazi isn't horribly misquoting the Talmud, it does appear that Jews used teach that "gentiles are less than human," but they're getting along with modern democracy just as well as anybody else. Everybody's religious texts say some crazy shit, but we're mostly able to get on with life despite that. There is no reason to think that Muslims are any different.

more than 3 years ago
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Former Truck Driver Reconstructs A-bomb

crazyeddie740 Re:whoa! (332 comments)

Yes, countries that institute Sharia have zero respect for non-believers, but that's because Sharia is a body of religious law. Countries that institute religious law tend to not be respectful of non-believers for some reason. Instituting religious law is incompatible with a modern democracy period, regardless of which religion we're talking about.

What is needed is the development of a Muslim Democrat movement similar to the Christian Democrats of Europe or arguably the Republicans of America. I wouldn't vote for them myself, just as I probably wouldn't vote for Christian Democrats and don't vote for Republicans. However, it is much better to have loyal democratic opposition than a disloyal antidemocratic opposition. It's better to have Social Democrats than antidemocratic Revolutionary Communists. The Muslim Brotherhood looks like it is headed in this Muslim Democrat direction, but only time will tell.

You might argue that Christians are more likely to accept democracy than other religions, given the whole "render on to Cesar that which is Cesar's" thing. Are there any non-Christian religions that are compatible with democracy? Could these provide a model for Muslim Democrats?

"If you truly believe the militants in those ghettos are just gonna wake up and embrace democracy I have a bridge you might be interested in." 1) How long did it take militant Catholics or militant Puritans to wake up and embrace democracy? 2) It's not the militants we need to win over, just the silent majority of regular Joes (or Achmeds, as the case may be). Militants can be isolated. 3) As for why Muslims in Europe might not be integrating... Based on American history, when immigrant communities don't integrate, it's usually because they are facing discrimination from the 'natives,' and are banding together for mutual protection. If Muslims aren't integrating, maybe the problem isn't on their side.

"you can't have a dialog with someone whose faith teaches that you are less than human, which is exactly what a Dhimmi is, no different that the 3/5ths rule the USA had for blacks." And we to some extent worked out the Black thing, at least to the point that we now have a Black president. It did take a Civil War, but it was mostly politics. It certainly didn't involve wholesale religious conversion or genocide, which would seem to be the only solutions to the "Muslim Problem" if you are correct.

more than 3 years ago
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Former Truck Driver Reconstructs A-bomb

crazyeddie740 Re:whoa! (332 comments)

Have you people even considered that they didn't make an atomic device because they don't want to?

They're people too you know? They want to live their lives like everybody else.

Even the suicide bombers, the guys who blow themselves up with a bunch of civilians who have nothing to do with anything?

Yes, believe it or not, suicide bombers are people too: http://muslimmatters.org/2008/04/19/the-psychology-of-the-suicide-bomber/

However, since ordinary people are quite capable of violence against the Other, being unable to get nuclear material is probably a better explanation.

more than 3 years ago
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Glen Beck Warns Viewers Not To Use Google

crazyeddie740 Re:I think Beck has started to believe his own con (1276 comments)

Um, you may be mistakenly assuming that young liberals get their news from the 24-hour news networks. I don't have TV at the moment, and even if I did, I'd just watch PBS Newshour. I get most of my news online. I don't know how many people in the young liberal demographic are like this, but I do know that the 24-hours news networks suck. It could be that Fox News is just more popular among the young people that watch 24-hour news.

more than 3 years ago
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Internet Is Easy Prey For Governments

crazyeddie740 Re:It doesn't have to be that way ... (314 comments)

Bulls eye, several times over. I look forwards to a time when "Internet" is a mesh of WiFis organically recovering from physical attempts at sabotage in seconds, but saying that one want us to "build a communications infrastructure that cannot be controlled from the top" is just silly. It's a matter of materials and economics - as long as we need to rely on kilometres of cables, we will need to rely on whoever controls the kilometres of cables (which for economical reasons will have to be just a few large players, i.e. states). If we rely on satellites we rely on whoever controls the satellites. I just hope it will remain infeasible to control radio waves in the air.

Apparently you can make and launch a cubesat for less than $100,000. How hard would it be for a grassroots organization to put together a constellation of cubesat routers? How hard would it be for people living in censored territories to cobble together an uplink?

more than 3 years ago
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Internet Is Easy Prey For Governments

crazyeddie740 Re:It doesn't have to be that way ... (314 comments)

Cubesats might be better than ground-based meshes. Just need to bounce the signal up to and down from orbit instead of having to blanket an entire area with wifi routers. Cubesat launches apparently cost about $40,000, anybody want to start a kickstarter project? The cubesat launches might be a bit of a bottleneck, in addition to the money, I'm not sure how NASA or whoever might feel about pirate radio routers in outer space. We would need to come up with a cheap and easy way for people in the censored territories to be able to build an uplink. The uplink beam should be narrow, so the authorities couldn't detect it - I don't think them being able to see the downlink would be a problem, just encrypt it. (Might be a problem if the powers that be have anti-sat weapons!). Spread out groundstations internationally, use them as freenet-style distributed nodes for the cubesat network, as well as proxies into the standard internet. How does that sound?

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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crazyeddie740 crazyeddie740 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

crazyeddie740 writes "I have an idea for a website, which I'm calling "virtualdemocracy.org" for now. For lack of a better term, it would be a mock congress, a place where people can come together and work out statements of shared belief. I don't particularly like the term "mock congress," since that implies that this site wouldn't do anything important, but it's the closest term I can come up with. At any rate, I have two big ideas that I think will make this site special...

The first big idea is a modified rules of order that borrows concepts from both wikis and open-source programming. Instead of having to amend a bill the old fashioned way, anybody (for certain values of "anybody") can edit a proposed bill, using a simplified markup language, just like in a wiki. In order to cut down on the bickering that takes place in wikis, the sponsor of the bill will serve as a gatekeeper, and will get to decide who can edit the bill. Gatekeepers will also be given a chance to remove any last minute vandalism before the bill gets voted on. The authority of the gatekeeper will not be absolute because anybody can fork the bill and become the gatekeeper of their own version of the bill. If a bill gets forked, then the group will be given a chance to pick their favorite version through instant-runoff or concordat voting before the winning version receives final approval through an up-or-down vote.

The second big idea is that members of the site will be automagically assigned to "political parties" based on their votes on bills and on various polls. In this day and age, political labels are virtually meaningless. "Liberal," "conservative," "moderate," "independent," "libertarian" all mean very different things depending on who uses them. Instead of assigning people to "political parties" based on how they label themselves, they'll be placed based on their actual voting records. These "political parties" will be part of a structure in which ideas — in the form of resolutions passed by "political parties" and other groups — can vary, mutate, cross-pollinate, and compete before going before the site as a whole for approval.

My hope is that these ideas and others will transform this website into something more than just a mock congress, but a place where people can both hang out with others who share their views and also have actual meaningful discussions with people with different viewpoints without descending into the mudslinging that happens all too often on the 'net. (Or at least I think we can keep the mudslinging to a minimum. I'm not asking for miracles here!) The need to work together to build resolutions will help to keep discussions on track.

Of course, there is just one big problem — I can't code my way out of a paper bag. I need someone to do the actual heavy lifting needed to get this site off the ground. And did I mention that I have zero budget, being a broke college student on foodstamps? There is the possibility of grants and/or donations, but we'd probably need a business manager for that. I used to own a small business, but that just means that I now know my limits.

So, are there any volunteers out there? Offers of support, moral or otherwise? Constructive criticism?"

Journals

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Virtual Democracy

crazyeddie740 crazyeddie740 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

I have an idea for a website, which I'm calling "virtualdemocracy.org" for now. For lack of a better term, it would be a mock congress, a place where people can come together and work out resolutions, statements of shared belief. I don't particularly like the term mock congress, since that implies that this site won't do anything important, but it's the closest term I can come up with.

I have two big ideas that I think will make this site special.

The first is a modified rules of order that borrows concepts from wikis and from open-source programming. Instead of having to amend a bill the old fashioned way, anybody (for certain values of "anybody") can edit a proposed bill, using a simplified markup language, just like in a wiki. In order to cut down on the bickering that takes place in wikis, the sponsor of the bill will serve as a gatekeeper, and will get to decide who can edit the bill and remove any last minute vandalism before the bill goes for an up-or-down vote. In addition, anybody can fork the bill and create a new version which they will be the gatekeeper of. If a bill gets forked, then the group will be given a chance to pick their favorite version through instant-runoff or concordat voting before the winner goes for an up-or-down vote.

The second big idea is that members of the site will be automagically assigned to "political parties" based on their votes on bills and on various polls. In this day and age, political labels are virtually meaningless. "Liberal," "conservative," "moderate," "independent," "libertarian" all mean very different things depending on who uses them. Instead of assigning people to "political parties" based on how they label themselves, they'll be placed based on their actual voting records. These "political parties" will be part of a structure in which ideas - in the form of resolutions passed by "political parties" and other groups - can vary, mutate, cross-pollinate, and compete before going before the site as a whole for approval.

My hope is that these ideas and others will transform this website into something more than just a mock congress, but a place where people can both hang out with others who share their views and have actual meaningful discussions with people with different viewpoints without descending into the mudslinging that happens all too often on the 'net. (Or at least I think we can keep the mudslinging to a minimum. I'm not asking for miracles here :-)) The need to work together to build resolutions will help to keep discussions on track.

Of course, there is just one big problem - I can't code my way out of a paper bag. I need someone to do the actual heavy lifting needed to get this site off the ground. And did I mention that I have zero budget, being a broke college student on foodstamps? There is the possibility of grants and/or donations, but we'd probably need a business manager for that. I used to own a small business, but that just means that I now know my limits.

So, are there any volunteers out there? Offers of support, moral or otherwise? Constructive criticism?

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