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Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit

cream wobbly Re:Why speed only a little? (426 comments)

Which these days are perfectly capable of doing 120 mph without breaking a sweat.

yesterday
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Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit

cream wobbly Re:A limit is a limit (426 comments)

This only bolsters the claim that autonomous vehicles should be restricted to private lanes. We call them trams, or in the US "streetcars".

yesterday
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Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit

cream wobbly Re:Safety vs Law (426 comments)

It's called "anticipation". If you don't have it you shouldn't be on the road. (Which would take about 99% of all US drivers down.)

yesterday
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Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit

cream wobbly Re:Safety vs Law (426 comments)

Speed limits aren't the same as speed limits.

Let me clarify:

UK speed limits aren't the same thing as US speed limits. They have different reasons for existence. In the UK speeds are set at a reasonable level for the condition of the road. In the US, somebody counts their fingers and toes until they can't go any higher and puts the result (or something like it) on a sign. Either that or police departments say "We're not meeting our speed ticket quota" and have the limit lowered. Often new lower limits are posted after a road is improved. And that's considering US speed limits were often originally set for unmetalled farm tracks. So we have wide two-way roads with 50 mph speed limits where a narrower road would be 60 in the UK. We have urban dual carriageways with a 35 mph limit where the UK would see 50 mph. We have rural divided highways with 50 mph limits where the UK limit would be the default 70 mph. Big difference.

So absolutely, speeding in the US is normal driving, and per TFS, not speeding is the more dangerous habit.

That doesn't transfer to the UK, where speeding is antisocial arseclown behaviour.

yesterday
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Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit

cream wobbly Re:Left or Right? (426 comments)

Closer to the point of the article, habits of US drivers do not automatically transfer to other countries. In the US it's very common for drivers to overshoot when making a turn onto a multi-lane street (e.g., driver in lane 1 of 2 turns right onto lane 3 of 3, where 1 is rightmost lane). In the UK it's bordering on the unconscionable.

But this lack of bad habits is an advantage of moving to the UK (and Europe). Also for the facts that signage and road markings are far clearer and more consistent, and vehicle roadworthiness rules are enforced. The basics can be dealt with in a wonderland of discipline and safety, and then the project can be booted back over the wall to the US team to deal with the road stupid I have to deal with daily.

yesterday
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Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit

cream wobbly Re:Left or Right? (426 comments)

Not just "left or right?", but "10 mph over or 10% + 3 mph over?". In the US, you can typically drive 10 mph over the limit without getting pulled over by police. In the UK the rule is 10% of the speed limit + 3 mph for equipment tolerances. So, if the posted limit is 25 mph, your "hard limit" is 25 + 2.5 + 3 = 30.5 mph. Likewise for 70 mph (national limit for motorways and dual carriageways), the "hard limit" is 70 + 7 + 3 = 80 mph.

Chalk it up to another case where American assumptions do not apply abroad.

yesterday
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DARPA Wants To Kill the Password

cream wobbly Re: There we go again (383 comments)

When all you have is a keyboard, everything looks like a string of characters.

The biggest problem with biometrics is that we only have one set of them and they're not invulnerable. You find some way to authenticate as me, you suddenly have everything of mine.

Except my root password.

about a week ago
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DARPA Wants To Kill the Password

cream wobbly Re: There we go again (383 comments)

Talk to AC-x. He thinks he should be able to crack it for you.

about a week ago
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DARPA Wants To Kill the Password

cream wobbly Re: There we go again (383 comments)

I don't think you understood what Desler was responding to, and when you realised, you tried to make it look like he was making some other response. Trying to make him look like an ass backfired on you.

about a week ago
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DARPA Wants To Kill the Password

cream wobbly Re: There we go again (383 comments)

I think sentences would be OK. Because of proper case and punctuation, a dictionary hack would take some time.

Incorrect case and punctuation also helps. Same with incorrect spellings.

about a week ago
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Ancient Worms May Have Saved Life On Earth

cream wobbly Re:Saved the earth (54 comments)

At one point Homo erectus dropped down to under 1000 individuals. At another, it dropped down to fewer than 1. That didn't change history, it just established it.

about two weeks ago
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Ancient Worms May Have Saved Life On Earth

cream wobbly Re:Saved the earth (54 comments)

Exactly, (but not completely).

Changing any one thing in the history of life on Earth, correct, means that life now wouldn't exist precisely as it does. If these worms had never evolved that behaviour, then oxygenation might not have happened, and life would have continued in a carbon dioxide-rich environment. Or some other organism or event might have adopted the role of oxygenator, and oxygenation levels might have been different, which again, would mean different evolutionary pressures would apply. Complex life might never have evolved, or it might have evolved sooner or later.

For TFS to breathlessly claim Ancient Worms May Have Saved Life On Earth is specious and demonstrates a fundamental ungrokking of the undirectedness of evolution.

about two weeks ago
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New Car Heads-Up Display To Be Controlled By Hand Gestures, Voice Commands

cream wobbly Re:For everyone with.... (142 comments)

"Weird accents" like anything that isn't Received Pronunciation British or American English?

about two weeks ago
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2D To 3D Object Manipulation Software Lends Depth to Photographs

cream wobbly Unbelievable (76 comments)

Wouldn't it be better if the results were believable?

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do About the Sorry State of FOSS Documentation?

cream wobbly Re:Read the source code (430 comments)

Agreed. I think several here have different expectations of what constitutes "good documentation". Being a Linux sysadmin, I work in FOSS day in, day out, and documentation is always available and clear.

As soon as I dip a toe into proprietary software, I'm met with a stubborn inability to communicate from the publisher. NVIDIA, HP, Microsoft, rank about the same in terms of opacity. Even Red Hat's documentation of their proprietary products are no match for the exact same company's contributions to FOSS documentation.

But then there are other FOSS products that match proprietary for its lousiness in documentation. Ganglia, Puppet, I'm looking at you.

about two weeks ago
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Unesco Probing Star Wars Filming In Ireland

cream wobbly Re:Today I Learnt that... (181 comments)

They're protected because their nesting sites are scarce. Not because the species are rare.

I'm not a bird watcher and I've heard of every single one of those species. I don't think the fact I'm English and therefore local to these species is the reason why. It's more likely to be that general knowledge education is simply better in UK schools. Since moving to the US, I'm constantly surprised by the general ignorance of Americans. It wouldn't be so bad if the reaction was "Ooh! Tell me more!" but more often than not I'm met with anger that I've shown someone up for their ignorance, or worse still, pride in ignorance.

about three weeks ago
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What percentage of your media consumption is streamed?

cream wobbly Re:First Vost (152 comments)

He said first post and first vote. Hence "vost". Not a very good portmanteau, but plenty more "vosts" if you look carefully.

about three weeks ago
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What percentage of your media consumption is streamed?

cream wobbly Re:First Vost (music or vid) (152 comments)

(Just checked. It says "media" in the quiz.)

Facebook is streamed since the content pulled via an XmlHttpRequest. Slashdot is static, but I read Facebook waaaaay more. I get my news from the Breaking News site, Google News, the DuckDuckGo Android app, and sometimes from Flipboard. Again, streamed. But those are just links to static sites.

For music, I stream it to my car radio, typically. Or it's static on a USB stick.

For video, roughly 50/50 streamed or static files.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Canon copiers to tell tales

cream wobbly cream wobbly writes  |  more than 3 years ago

cream wobbly (1102689) writes "Company secrets disappearing out the door? Canon can help. Their newly announced photocopiers include OCR software that prevents copying of and reports on certain keywords. What with cellphones being so prohibitively expensive these days, this couldn't have come sooner."
Link to Original Source

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