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Comments

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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

creimer Re:Linux, cryptography, HTML and JavaScript. (135 comments)

That was about half my cost of a single semester in grad school. Not that I had to pay it, since I taught undergrad classes for a 100% tuition waiver + a $1400 a month stipend.

I see what your problem is now. You went to grad school, graduated with a very small dick, and must beat up on someone else to compensate for your lack of rigor.

3 hours ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

creimer Re:Linux, cryptography, HTML and JavaScript. (135 comments)

An AA in "programming" does not make you a programmer. That is a small step above reading a programming for dummies book. A very small step.

Good thing Uncle Sam paid for my AS (associate of science) degree with a $3,000 USD tax credit. I would never paid $3,000 for Dummies books. Oh, BTW, this is my second associate degree. I got my first associate degee in General Education after I graduated from the eighth grade and skipped high school.

7 hours ago
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College Students: Want To Earn More? Take a COBOL Class

creimer Re:Required languages to know (259 comments)

Don't forget that HR folks will expect five years of experience in the newest technology that came out six months ago.

yesterday
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

creimer Re:Linux, cryptography, HTML and JavaScript. (135 comments)

If you are not a programmer you have no business commenting and you obviously fail to understand how software and hardware interact.

I guess an associate degree in computer programming, six years as a software tester and ten years as an IT technician doesn't count for anything.

yesterday
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College Students: Want To Earn More? Take a COBOL Class

creimer Re:The UK Cobol Climate Is Very Different (259 comments)

Could be worst. I'm working in an office filled with ex-military types. They weren't happy with me until I shaved everyday, ironed my dress pants everyday, and got a crew cut every month. Now I'm a well-scrubbed jarhead just like them.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: Have You Experienced Fear Driven Development?

creimer Try Fear Driven Testing... (223 comments)

I worked for a video game company where the new manager ran the QA department like a personal dictatorship. You were either with him or against him. He came down hard on me because I documented EVERYTHING as a lead tester. The previous manager nearly got fired because I documented his decisions that caused two of my projects to implode, and got "promoted" to associate producer to the corporate office in NYC. The new manager didn't want me to document any of his actions (most of which would cause heartburn for HR) and thought I was out to get him like the last manager. The truth of the matter is that I didn't care about these paranoid basketcases.

Wasn't long before I got a written warning for "insubordination" by not following his directions that would have a negative impact on my project. He followed it up with his infamous "my way or the highway" speech. So I took the highway and left the company after six years in 2004. I was the third out of a dozen senior testers who left the department that year. A decade later, the QA department is no more as the company stopped selling PC and console games, started making FaceBook games with limited appeal, and rehashing past products for online distributions. I became an IT support technician who no longer had to deal with fear driven management.

yesterday
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

creimer Re:Linux, cryptography, HTML and JavaScript. (135 comments)

You obviously didn't learn enough to realize that C and C++ are completely different languages and should be approached as such.

You obviously don't recognize a shorthand expression for C AND C++. Different languages, sure. Separate languages, not entirely. Doesn't matter since I'm not a programmer by trade. I took programming to understand how software works on the hardware.

2 days ago
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Court Rules the "Google" Trademark Isn't Generic

creimer So Google isn't the next Xerox?! (156 comments)

I'm shocked -- shocked! -- that Google isn't another generic Silicon Valley company.

2 days ago
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Uber CEO: We'll Run Your Errands

creimer Re:Uber = Amazon (139 comments)

All Uber needs is one good lawsuit, say, a driver running over a boy scout with a little old lady in the crosswalk, to make all the profits disappear. The business model haven't been tested in court yet. So liability may not be limited to the drivers.

2 days ago
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Uber CEO: We'll Run Your Errands

creimer Uber = Amazon (139 comments)

Looks like Uber is becoming the next Amazon by pursuing every possible angle to maintain growth while in search of nonexistent profits. Looking forward to the Uber Phone rollout.

3 days ago
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New Data Center Protects Against Solar Storm and Nuclear EMPs

creimer Re:2000 square feet? (59 comments)

Can I convert my basement into a data center and get it on slashdot too?

Putting your kids out on the streets wouldn't be good for society.

3 days ago
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New Data Center Protects Against Solar Storm and Nuclear EMPs

creimer What about the pipes? (59 comments)

Protecting the data center from EMP is one thing. If the pipes to Internet aren't protected against EMP, data entering and leaving the data center will get corrupted. Garbage in, garbage out.

3 days ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

creimer Re:Linux, cryptography, HTML and JavaScript. (135 comments)

The dean fought back against the college administration. As a student, I was frustrated that EVERYTHING was taught in Java because it didn't require a site license. The job market then had too many Java programmers. (If Python becomes the new teaching language, we will soon have too many Python programmers.) I jumped at the chance of learning shell scripting and C/C++ during his Unix administration. I was bitterly disappointed that the assembly language class I wanted to take got cancelled in my final semester.

4 days ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

creimer Re:About Time The Market Got Hot (135 comments)

Re-imaging a system takes a minimum of four hours. You have to track down the location of the system. You have to browbeat the user into surrendering the system for most of the day. You may have to backup multiple user profiles (some systems have 200+ users and 50GB+ of data). The re-imaging process takes ten minutes. And then you have transfer the user profiles back, return the system to the user, and field phone calls for a month as the user(s) nitpick over the system as they believe you broke something.

My job as a security support specialist is to fix the system after the automation had FAILED. Otherwise, the system won't communicate with the servers, won't get patched and updated, and becomes a security risk to the rest of the network. Maybe someday my team will get replaced by a code monkey. Maybe someday Microsoft will stop writing operating systems with spaghetti code and major vulnerabilities.

5 days ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

creimer Re:About Time The Market Got Hot (135 comments)

Fixing each system is a lot faster than re-imaging each system. That would be a huge waste of resources. Everything is done remotely in the background without inconveniencing the user. A typical fix takes 15 to 30 minutes. My team fixes 1,000 systems per week.

5 days ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

creimer Re:About Time The Market Got Hot (135 comments)

The only person complaining about my associate degree is YOU. I'm quite satisified with my second associate degree, which Uncle Sam paid for with a $3,000 tax credit, and making the college president's list for maintaining a 4.0 GPA in my major. (I earned my first associate degree in general education after graduating from the eight grade and skipping high school.) Perhaps you're trying to compensate for something, say, a lack of rigor?

Not to mention- wtf does a "security support specialist" do?

I work on a team of 20 security specialists responsible for 80,000 Windows systems. We each have 15 to 20 years of IT experience. About 10% of the systems don't patch properly, have broken antivirus clients, incorrect software versions, unauthorized software, and many other issues. We remediate (i.e., fix) 1,000+ systems per week. Information security is a growing field.

5 days ago
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Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

creimer Re:Question is - will they keep going? (135 comments)

I saw this same jump in enrollment in CS towards the end of the dotcom boom, and that was even before everyone was carrying around computers in their pockets.

I went back to school beween 2002 and 2007 on a part-time basis while working full-time to learn computer programming. The market for IT classes was still hot and most classes had waiting lists in 2002. Healthcare became the new money major that everyone chased after. When I graduated five years later, all my required courses for graduation were cancelled as they weren't enough students and took them as independent study classes. Back then everyone had laptops in their backpacks.

about a week ago

Submissions

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China Brushes Out Distinctive Hues of Names

creimer creimer writes  |  more than 5 years ago

creimer writes "The New York Times is reporting that some Chinese citizens will have to change their name for the new identity cards.

"The bureau's computers, however, are programmed to read only 32,252 of the roughly 55,000 Chinese characters, according to a 2006 government report. The result is that Miss Ma and at least some of the 60 million other Chinese with obscure characters in their names cannot get new cards — unless they change their names to something more common.""

Link to Original Source
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creimer creimer writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Christopher D. Reimer writes "The New York Times is reporting the death of John W. Backus, 82, creator of the FORTRAN programming language. From the article: 'Mr. Backus and his youthful team, then all in their 20s and 30s, devised a programming language that resembled a combination of English shorthand and algebra. Fortran, short for Formula Translator, was very similar to the algebraic formulas that scientists and engineers used in their daily work. With some training, they were no longer dependent on a programming priesthood to translate their science and engineering problems into a language a computer would understand.'"
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creimer creimer writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Chris Reimer writes "The San Jose Mercury News is reporting that only one percent of web pages are sexually explict. From the article: 'A confidential analysis of Internet search queries and a random sample of Web pages taken from Google and Microsoft's giant Internet indices showed that only about 1 percent of all Web pages contain sexually explicit material. [...] The ACLU said the analysis, by Philip B. Stark, a professor of statistics at the University of California, Berkeley, did not appear to substantially help the Department of Justice in its effort to prove that criminal penalties are necessary to protect minors from exposure to sexually explicit information on the Internet.'"
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creimer creimer writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Chris Reimer writes "The New York Times is reporting a federal investigation of the the Venezuelan owners of Smartmatic Corporation, a voting software company, and whether the anti-U.S. government is trying to influence the U.S. midterm elections. According to the article: 'Government officials familiar with the Smartmatic inquiry said they doubted that even if the Chávez government was some kind of secret partner in the company, it would try to influence elections in the United States. But some of them speculated that the purchase of Sequoia could help Smartmatic sell its products in Latin America and other developing countries, where safeguards against fraud are weaker.'"
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creimer creimer writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Chris Reimer writes "Call me an old fart but I been trying to find a brand new manual typewriter at a reasonable price so I can fulfill my Hemingway fantasy of writing on a typewriter and drinking a shot between pages. (The MacBook is nice but falls a bit short in the fantasy department.) There seem to be only one model from two different vendors (the MS 25 from Olivetti and Royal). Does anyone know if there are other manual typewriters available?"
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creimer creimer writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Chris Reimer writes "The BBC is reporting that the American Bluegills fish is being used as an early warning system for dangerous substances in the local water supply. From the article: 'A small number of fish are kept in tanks which are constantly filled with water from the municipal supply. The computerised system registers changes in the fishes' vital signs and sends an alert when something is wrong. Since 11 September 2001, the US government has taken the threat of attacks on water supplies seriously.'"

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