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Comments

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Wikipedia Editors Hit With $10 Million Defamation Suit

crossmr Re:But is it false? (268 comments)

That's not what it means by public interest.

It means that it's something that is crucial for people to know.

The fact that some random guy had an affair isn't really in the public's interest. It really doesn't make any difference to anyone except him and his wife if he's had an affair. However, if the guy was doing something bad that affected many people like say touching little kids or selling tainted food, that would be in the public's interest to know. Essentially the person would need to give cause as to why people would need to know the information that was said or written in order to defend against the charge.

about a month ago
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Wikipedia Editors Hit With $10 Million Defamation Suit

crossmr Re:But is it false? (268 comments)

For the most part that wouldn't involve Korea or Koreans on the vast majority of topics. Other than the Japanese/Korean editors who constantly war on there.
Sure they can be all different countries, but we know that the hosting/registration/etc doesn't have anything to do with Korea.

It would really only end up in the courts here if the subject and editor were both in Korea. Koreans don't seem to do a lot of suing of foreign nationals who aren't here to defend themselves in the courts, at least nothing that really makes the news.

about a month ago
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Wikipedia Editors Hit With $10 Million Defamation Suit

crossmr Re:But is it false? (268 comments)

They should be glad they aren't in South Korea.
After moving here and giving the laws a good read, it's quite interesting.

Truth isn't a defense here. Simply saying something negative about someone is sufficient for defamation, and the only defense is "public interest". If you can prove it was in the public's best interest to know that information you're okay.

Further defamation is part of criminal law here. 2 years for defaming someone with a true statement, 5 years for a false statement. There is a separate law for defaming the dead with a false statement.

Korea also has public insult laws on the books. So if you insult someone publicly so that others can hear it, that's also a criminal offence.

To a certain extent, the laws are somewhat interesting. they have a "keep your nose in your own business" kind of quality about them. I'm not sure what would happen to a thing like wikipedia if it was hosted here.

about a month ago
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Wikipedia Editors Hit With $10 Million Defamation Suit

crossmr Re:Move to Europe (268 comments)

Doesn't that only apply to old irrelevant information?

about a month ago
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Lego To Produce Three Box Sets Featuring Female Scientists

crossmr Re:why is this news? (208 comments)

Oxford, a Korean Lego clone, actually had the foresight to make sure their girls sets used the same bodies. Even their hello kitty line uses large heads attached to regular bodies.

Despite Oxford bricks being lego compatible (and as good quality wise) sadly their minifigs aren't totally the same. The bodies are slightly different. You can swap hands and heads but that's it. They are the same size though, so outside of some slightly off looking legs they can mingle

They also didn't completely overdo it in the pink purple department:

http://oxfordtoy.co.kr/pro/up_...

A set like that goes for about $45 USD in Korea.

I really wish they'd get their act together though and focus on developing lines like Lego does. Their military line is incredible.

about 2 months ago
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German Court Rules That You Can't Keep Compromising Photos After a Break-Up

crossmr Re:Ramifications (334 comments)

The fact that you need to put art in scare quotes indicates that you've got some kind of inherent bias here, and it's obviously coloring your perspective.

This tells me you have no idea what the words "explicit" and "implicit" mean, in a legal context or otherwise.

I'm aware of what they mean. I think in most situations, at least the first time one party tries to snap some intimate photos, a direct question would be asked "Do you mind if I take these photos?" or "is it okay to take some pictures?" or even a "let's take some photos" waiting for a confirmation. Allowing the photographs to be taken in that context is explicit. Further along in the relationship the party may just take the phone out and start snapping as it's assumed that the consent continues and it's unnecessary to ask every time.
That's implicit consent unless the party suddenly objects at some point.

Nobody is revoking the creator's right to keep "art" that they have legally obtained informed consent for. For example, I think I should be able to write a contract that says I will allow you to take my photo, but that you have to destroy all copies of it after five years. You don't have to agree if you don't want to take the photo. Should the law prevent such a contract?

The problem is there was no duration specified at the time of the creation. That was not the contract as created, and it's a non-starter here. This is exactly like you agreeing to pose for photos then 5 years later suddenly going back and saying "oh yeah, you know what I know I agreed to them and you put all that work into them, maybe even exhibited them, etc, but now I'd like you to destroy them all, k thanx"

That's pure and simple bullshit.

The subject never specified they were for the length of the relationship, and there is no reason the photographer should be the one who suffers for them failing to specify the terms they wanted when they consented to have the work created. Now the article mentions that she took some herself. It's certainly within her rights to withdraw any implied usage rights when she shared those photos with him and ask for those to be destroyed/returned.

but "compromising" photos are a special case.

You talk about America being puritan but then think nude photos should get special care. Which is it? There is in fact no reason that nude photos should get special attention. A photo is a photo is a photo.

about 2 months ago
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German Court Rules That You Can't Keep Compromising Photos After a Break-Up

crossmr Re:Ramifications (334 comments)

That is a totally unwarranted assumption, many such photos are taken without explicit consent in either the legal or common usage. But let's just run with the specific example you want to use, to keep things simple. He asks "Can I take some nude photos?" and she says "Yes, go ahead."

It's not unwarranted at all. Unless the pictures were taken secretly via hidden camera the issue of taking pictures was discussed and the subject agreed.

Otherwise if one party whipped out their camera and started snapping away and the other party didn't want it, they would have stated as much.

If someone is going to court to withdraw consent, it's because consent was given in the first place.

You continue to get hung up on the legal definitions and legal precedent (particularly American law, I assume). That's fine, but you need to be clear on that. It is quite probable that a judge in America, right now under current laws would not require someone to return or destroy all nude photos of their ex. Just because the subject hasn't given unlimited explicit consent is not LEGALLY important. Morally, ethically, logically, yes. Just not LEGALLY, right here, right now.

That's right, it isn't legally important, that's the way the law works. Oral contracts are also legally binding in many places. So while they may not have a signed piece of paper, the verbal consent given to take the photos is a contract to create those works.

If you don't think the law regarding photography has changed since 1814, then I'd have to say you were mistaken. All the laws that govern this case have changed dramatically since the invention of photography and they continue to evolve at different paces and in different directions depending on the jurisdiction. It is quite possible that the laws covering this area in America will change, but even more likely that courts will interpret existing laws in light of new technology as they have done in many cases, including this one in Germany.

It's changed, but an author's right to their own work has pretty much always been tantamount. This is a dangerous road to travel for art.

about 2 months ago
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German Court Rules That You Can't Keep Compromising Photos After a Break-Up

crossmr Re:Ramifications (334 comments)

There is absolutely explicit consent given when the image is created. Unless the party is claiming they didn't consent at the time, consent was given.

Usage rights are not the same thing as ownership and copyright.

However, personal private usage rights to any photograph a photographer creates is always a given, regardless of any other usage rights. The photographer has a right to keep that in his personal collection. He may not be allowed to display it publicly, use it commercially, or even hang it in his house, but having the image sitting on a hard drive is absolutely within his rights.

Unless the subject has a written "work for hire" contract in most jurisdictions, the photographs are copyright and owned by the photographer. Changing your mind later because of a personal relationship doesn't somehow trump hundreds of years of law surrounding art.

about 2 months ago
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German Court Rules That You Can't Keep Compromising Photos After a Break-Up

crossmr Re:Ridiculous (334 comments)

That's why nude models have contracts. Often there is a clause that lets them back out later, but only if they compensate the artist.

No they do not.

That's why they have contracts, because if they get cold feet after the fact the photographer can point to it and say sorry, but you signed off on this, I'm not tossing away all my hard work. I don't know of any standard modelling contracts that include clauses for a model to change her mind later.

Really? Because I note that there has been a crack down on revenge porn sites in the US.

Yes, and what's that all about? Is the crackdown about consent to the creation of the photograph or usage?

about 2 months ago
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German Court Rules That You Can't Keep Compromising Photos After a Break-Up

crossmr Re:Ramifications (334 comments)

They consented to having the image created at the time. They would admit as much by taking it to court to revoke their consent. It doesn't really matter how they consented, both parties are in agreement that consent was given at the time to create the photo. Once an image is created you can only talk about usage rights regarding any public usage of the photo. They certainly can't build a time machine and go back and revoke the consent they gave to actually take the picture at the time.

They may not want the photographer to be able to use the image by publicly displaying it going forward, but those are usage rights, that has nothing to do with the consent given when the photograph was taken. The artistic ownership and control of the image belongs to the author of the photo which the subject is not.

about 2 months ago
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German Court Rules That You Can't Keep Compromising Photos After a Break-Up

crossmr Re:Ramifications (334 comments)

A photographer has copyright by virtue of being the author of a creative work. That's it. You do not need a release to own copyright. Model releases are not about copyright. They are about usage rights.

The fucking stupid coming out of you is just mind boggling.

about 2 months ago
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German Court Rules That You Can't Keep Compromising Photos After a Break-Up

crossmr Re:Ramifications (334 comments)

While that may apply to future use, if consent is given to take a photo you can't go back and ask them to delete it either. They own the artistic copyright on that image. Whatever the merits may be. The subject consented when it was created. They might disallow further publishing of a photo, prevent it from being seen publicly, but to force someone to delete all traces of it is madness.

about 2 months ago
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Data Mining Shows How Down-Voting Leads To Vicious Circle of Negative Feedback

crossmr Re:BS (293 comments)

There is a lot of retaliatory butthurt behaviour on the internet.

You make one comment someone doesn't like and suddenly it's open season on everything you've ever said, regardless of it's worth. Somewhere like Reddit, someone will go through and downvote your last 40+ comments just because you got the better of them in a debate. Downvoting without commenting is the last vestige of the defeated. They know their argument can't hold water, so rather than concede the point, or move on, they go through and downvote anyone who spoke against them. While some comments are generally stupid enough that they need no reply (or further replies than the ones they've already received), someone who just abandons a discussion in favor of downvoting damages a community.

I can remember one exchange over on reddit, something on Korean language, where a native Korean chimes in as a reply to my comment "This guy is totally 100% right why is this being downvoted?" And it was all because of some other topic where a handful of butthurt children couldn't handle being proven wrong on a point so decided to run around downvoting anything else I'd posted within the last few days.

I've had it happen on Slashdot as well. Not in awhile, because I don't comment here as much as I used to (I used to frequently get mod points, but not that much recently). A few times, almost always after a debate with someone, the other party (I can only assume) would get mod points, and then past posts of mine, like ones over a week old, would suddenly all be moderated down as troll or something like that. I think I even made a post a few years ago about vindictive moderation.

 

about 2 months ago
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What Was the Greatest Age For Indie Games?

crossmr late 80s into the 90s (92 comments)

Say what you will about all the access devs have now, but it was that time when things were greatest.

People were still experimenting. Not just with concepts but core mechanics. Interfaces, everything. It was the wild west.

People weren't yet dumbing things down to make them more "Accessible", when you got a game there wasn't going to be another one in 5 minutes. The internet wasn't everywhere. People still had slow connections when it came around. You read magazines, hunted for games and traded with friends.

The early days were really the best for the entirety of computing. Sure, things are flashy, we have such powerful machines now. Those were the days of great games and great indie games.

about 3 months ago
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Valve Sponsors Work To Greatly Speed-Up Linux OpenGL Game Load Times

crossmr Re:And still linux sucks (202 comments)

They never declared it impossible. They said it was a riskier more uncertain market with no return potential. There is a difference.

about 3 months ago
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Valve Sponsors Work To Greatly Speed-Up Linux OpenGL Game Load Times

crossmr Re:And still linux sucks (202 comments)

Because being free isn't a pass on criticism. I'm not sure when that happened. Yes all the people who have devoted time and effort and money on Linux deserve credit for doing so. But for the end consumer there is no real difference between an OS you got for free and one you paid $100 for. They still need to work and they still need to do what you need. Otherwise free doesn't mean anything. In the end they're still providing a product regardless of the cost and the consumer is going to form an opinion on it and give feedback. It's simply just not there yet and the only thing that's really going to get it there, in my opinion, at this point is a huge infusion of cash in exactly the right direction.

about 3 months ago
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Valve Sponsors Work To Greatly Speed-Up Linux OpenGL Game Load Times

crossmr Re:And still linux sucks (202 comments)

Their claim is that it is is and that might be why they don't want it on Linux. Because it is less suitable, less easy, it will cost more to port it over and since they don't yet see a big market for users they won't do it.

It's chicken and the egg. The existence of other apps is immaterial. Other apps might be suited to Linux, they might be easy, cost effective to port and they might be targeting people who might otherwise already use linux.

However, if you get them to do it, the users will come and it will start to snowball. It needs that push to get going and that only comes with money.

about 3 months ago
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Valve Sponsors Work To Greatly Speed-Up Linux OpenGL Game Load Times

crossmr Re:And still linux sucks (202 comments)

Because linux isn't a cohesive platform. That's the problem. As I was googling around one of the staff at adobe mentioned last year that Linux lacked standardized APIs on a forum thread regarding photoshop on Linux.

There is a perception that Linux is a bit like the wild west and in this day and age when you have stable mature platforms like Mac and Windows available, that's risky for developers. Even for big companies.

The intrinsic connection they have is market share and having already been the platform for this programs for a long time. Linux needs to really step up and say "Hey we're ready look at us" but they haven't had that moment yet.

Ubuntu is a step in the right direction. If a company with real money can get behind it and drive it to some kind of consumer ready level like Windows or Mac is, enthusiasts can still sit there and fork and tweak and do as they like, but getting a real ready version there that gets people's attention and wants to make people use it and develop for it is what will drive Linux's success.

It might not be directly Linux's fault that Microsoft doesn't make office for Linux, but they just got office for IOS not that long ago. Who knows what kind of wrangling that took. But if I was someone like Canonical I'd see just how much money it would take to convince Microsoft to make it for linux and make that happen. I'd do the same with programs like Photoshop, and other major programs that have major user bases that are seen as core apps. Valve already seems like they're moving in the direction of taking care of games so I'd make sure I was meeting with them and getting everyone on the same page. They don't have to arrange all the programs. If they do a few core programs that reach a large percentage of the user base, the other programs will start to get ported to linux as user base picks up. For example if they paid to get photoshop and office ported and linux went from the low single digits its sitting around now on the desktop up to 20% or a little higher I think you'd see companies start to take notice and start to focus a little more on it.

about 3 months ago
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Valve Sponsors Work To Greatly Speed-Up Linux OpenGL Game Load Times

crossmr Re:And still linux sucks (202 comments)

except that no one does.

"anyone" sounds like a lot of people, but Linux isn't just for coder enthusiasts with the know-how to fix their own problems. If linux is going to really take off on the desktop those things simply need to be already taken care of. With microsoft floundering around with windows 8 and tablets taking off, if someone wanted to really get market share away from microsoft dumping money into Linux like valve is doing here is a good start. Especially if it can be done in such a way that major game studios can easily make their games multiplatform. Games are what keep a lot of dedicated enthusiasts of all ages away from Linux. So are things like photoshop or microsoft office, or etc. A lot of the core products that people need just don't work well or at all. You can carry on about alternatives, but people don't want alternatives for those kinds of things. The OS, which is mostly background to a lot of people is easy to persuade them on, you can make it look and feel like windows. but gimp will never feel and look like photoshop.

about 3 months ago
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Peoria Mayor Sends Police To Track Down Twitter Parodist

crossmr Re:Isn't parody protected in the US? (169 comments)

You did nothing to justify that, either.

There is very little to be done to justify balance in the world. That's a thing most well adjusted individuals accept as fact.

On a number of occasions, you attacked me for saying that a number of rights violations were bad. Forgive me for ever thinking that you were defending them.

No, I attacked you for coming across as mouthbreathing ranting moron, there is a difference. One you can't quite grasp which isn't a surprise.

Good luck with that, I'm sure it'll get you far.

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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Bing Localizations break links

crossmr crossmr writes  |  more than 4 years ago

crossmr (957846) writes "Since I moved halfway across the world, I have found that a lot of websites and software likes to make assumptions about you based on your IP. While it isn't obvious if you move to a country that has the same native language as you it becomes rather apparent when you move to a country with a different native language. Besides Windows Live Messenger sending me updates in Korean, even though I've selected English as my language and my account was created in an English speaking country years ago, Microsoft has taken this a step further with Bing and absolutely destroying links people send. A Bing video was linked on facebook today. Those of you in North America and maybe the UK will have no issue viewing the video. However here in South Korea Microsoft has decided that instead of serving the linked content, they're going to break the link and redirect to a local provider doing a search for itself. While I can appreciate that a site like google redirects to a Korean version when you go to google.com from Korea, they don't invalidate links to deeper content just because you're out of the country. I cannot find any obvious way to disable this "service". I had no inclination to use Bing before, but even less now."

Journals

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Vindictive moderation?

crossmr crossmr writes  |  more than 6 years ago

I check my user page on old comments fairly regularly. Usually once a day to see if there have been replies or moderation.
I don't specifically recall checking it yesterday, but I think I did. Today upon checking it I noticed a slew of flamebait/troll/redundant moderation on extremely old stories that didn't seem to be previously there.
I thought slashdot turned moderation off on stories that were more than a few days old, but I certainly don't recall previously seeing the flamebait on the May 5th comment and 12 days seems to be back to the point it would have been shut off.
It might be interesting if slashdot would at least display when something was moderated, because that kind of moderation to suddenly appear on several comments at once certainly seems fishy.

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