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Lying Eyes: Cyborg Glasses Simulate Eye Expressions

cstacy Successful Glasses (56 comments)

The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that you've got it made.

5 days ago
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Ancient Shrimp-Like Creature Has Oldest Known Circulatory System

cstacy Shouldn't this story... (35 comments)

...have been posted by nerval's lobster?

about two weeks ago
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Scientists Solve the Mystery of Why Zebras Have Stripes

cstacy Snopes (190 comments)

I remember reading an article on Snopes about this, quite a while ago.

As I understand it, the fly's visual system evolved a beneficial mutation that glitches what they see. Zebras are in reality just black horses (look at their snout), but the fly's retina paints those white stripes on them. This allows the fly to more easily attack the zebra, although not as effectively as if the animal was all white. This effect is well known in our domesticated horses -- horseflies are attracted to light colored animals such as Palominos. Humans are also faked out into thinking there are stripes because we only see zebras on nature documentaries, and a TV cameras have similar scanning artifacts.

That's the way I remember the Snopes article, anyway, and I read it on the Internet so it must be true.

about three weeks ago
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Should Patients Have the Option To Not Know Their DNA?

cstacy Re:Expanded Summary (157 comments)

What I don't understand is why you'll have your DNA tested often.

Because (a) it will be a routine part of your examination, and because medical records are not easily shared between providers they can't just look it up in your file and (b) they won't be full genome analysis (just looking at certain different things at different times) and (c) the "raw data" won't be easily available. When the storage and sharing (and privacy) issues with your DNA are technically and legally and procedurally solved someday, then they won't be needing to sample you very often. We're a long way from that in this decade.

about three weeks ago
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Should Patients Have the Option To Not Know Their DNA?

cstacy Re:Who Would (or Wouldn't) Want to Know? (157 comments)

Your doctor doesn't tell your insurance agency anything beyond "He had a consult, it costs $X. Pay up."
If he tells the insurance agency anything else, he is liable for a whole mess of lawsuits

The insurance company receives every detail of every procedure and every prescription that you have (as well as how often you fill it, whether you do so at the appropriate intervals, etc.) There is a lot more detail than "a consult". The insurance company then uses sophisticated AI programs to guess (when it isn't already spelled out) what's wrong with you, and what might go wrong with you in the future. They know a lot more than you seem to think. They read and process tremendous amounts of this information in near real-time. They use this knowledge for a variety of purposes. At least, that's what happens in the USA.

Guess how I know. Hint: I can't tell you any details due to NDA.

about three weeks ago
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Should Patients Have the Option To Not Know Their DNA?

cstacy Re:Op Out Knowledge? (157 comments)

The information that they're wondering if they should give you is often faulty, and results in people making bad choices. For example, undergoing preventive therapy that is costly, has serious side effects, and turns out to have been totally unnecessary. You weren't going to get that disease that you decided you needed to be treated for. Meanwhile, it caused you health problems, and untold mental agony, anda lifetime of worrying. Also for your relatives (children and parents). By giving them this information, you have failed to "First, Do No Harm."

If the genetic analysis were more reliable (like everyone reading this story probably assumes), it would be different. But currently, for most of the information that can be given, it's very dicey.

about three weeks ago
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The Era of Facebook Is an Anomaly

cstacy Misunderstanding Facebook (260 comments)

Facebook is not a place that everyone goes to. It is merely a hosting platform where people create zillions (of partially overlapping) "places" that they go to. Those millions of people are not on your Friends list. Facebook is millions of "places", not one. (However, George Takei's page is indeed the one single place in the world where everyone goes. But just for his stuff; nobody reads the comments.) As for Facebook "bombarding your news feed with useless information 24x7", ummm, that doesn't happen to me. Get a life?

about a month ago
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Bitcoin Inventor Satoshi Nakamoto Outed By Newsweek

cstacy Not Him (390 comments)

I wonder how much (or in what way) "they" paid this guy to pretend to be Satoshi Nakamoto?

about a month and a half ago
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Whole Foods: America's Temple of Pseudoscience

cstacy Re:Why single out Whole Foods? (794 comments)

skids:

the sellers are con artists and shouldn't be allowed to prey on them

There are con-artist products in every grocery store. Singling out Whole Foods for that is really just an excercise in hippie-punching. If we really want to crack down on false advertising claims, then 1) we should first actually verify them false with research rather than kneejerk skepticism and 2) concentrate on claims most detrimental to public health first, and then after that, those most detrimental to the economy.

Insightful.

about 2 months ago
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Woman Attacked In San Francisco Bar For Wearing Google Glass

cstacy Re:People will always feel threatened (921 comments)

...what will it take for general acceptance to finally take hold?

I doubt it will ever be truly widespread. Isn't it still illegal in most places to record people without prior permission, and threatening to record can also be seen as a threat?

No, it is not. In a public place you have no legal expectation of privacy. People can record you all they want. And they do.

What's going on here is that people don't like that fact. They don't like the government and corporate and even the individuals that are recording them everywhere all the time. They don't like being recorded with cell phones, either. But until now, it has been difficult to object to this "invasion of privacy". Along comes Google Glass, which just brings the reality to the forefront where you can't even pretend it isn't happening. Google Glass is both a symbol of "lost" privacy, and the first on-your-face-in-your-face implementation of the coming privacy-invading cyborg culture. While some embrace this future, others loathe and fear it.

In the case of the girl who was assaulted, battered, and robbed at the bar, there is an additional social factor. The people in that neighborhood bar HATE Google and have been assaulting Google employees on the street on their way to work. Hence the comment from the bar patron, "You people are ruining our city!" This incident was as much about hating Google and yuppie-techies in the city, as it was about privacy.

The (actual) privacy-in-public culture we've been living in was a brief and anomalous period in our history. In earlier days, you did not have much privacy in public places like streets and bars. The town was small, and "everyone knew everyone" (to some approximation). The whole town knew who was out and about, on what business, and talking to whom. And of course you could be overheard in bars. If you wanted privacy, you had to be a lot more discreet. When cities got big, it was possible to "get lost in the crowd" and hide in plain sight. Now things are turning around, and your activity outside your house is potentially exposed to everyone. With our new technology will come a return to the old no-privacy culture.

Society will adapt to provide some kinds of "public privacy" by opening bars that have a no-recording-devices policy. And there will be technological aspects to this. One example might be jamming of mobile devices on the premises. (This is currently illegal, and there are several social and legal issues to address there.) Another example: having to walk through the Device Detector (like a metal detector) gate at the bar entrance.

I have, on my head, a device with which I can access all the worlds knowledge, communicate with everyone on the planet, and record and share my life's experiences. I use it for looking at pictures of cats and picking fights with strangers in bars!

about 2 months ago
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Woman Attacked In San Francisco Bar For Wearing Google Glass

cstacy Re:There won't BE any "general acceptance" (921 comments)

does anybody actually know the laws around recording in public? Obv you can record celebrities because they do it on TMZ. and obv you can record with a security camera. but sometimes a tv show is recording at an airport or whatever and I walk by and there are signs "by passing by this sign you consent to being recorded." so obviously the right to record someone else is not absolute.

Can anybody add any actual information to this vacuum?

You are taking those signs at face value and drawing a conclusion from them. But that's not how the world works. There is no need for the airport or a mall to inform you that you might be recorded in public. You do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy when out in public. The reason for the sign is to intimidate the less-intelligent potential criminals who are going to the airport to steal people's luggage and such. The sign might more accurately read, "Attention Dumbshit: Don't Come In Here For Opportunistic Crime; Of Course You Are Being Recorded By Police Who Are Watching You On The Cameras, Hidden And Visible All Over The Place Here." But that wouldn't be as polite. Sometimes the signs do say things like, "Warning: Police Recording", though.

about 2 months ago
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A Modest Proposal, re: Beta vs. Classic

cstacy dollardotslash (19 comments)

dice $ ./beta
Segmentation Fault

about 2 months ago
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Amazon: We Can Ship Items Before Customers Order

cstacy UPS (243 comments)

Some say Milk Man's come back to the future!

about 3 months ago
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"Clinical Trials" For Programming Languages?

cstacy Moderator Guidelines (232 comments)

I have points but couldn't figure out how to mod the actual article -1 Flamebait

about 4 months ago
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Researchers Develop "Narrative Authentication" System

cstacy security questions (117 comments)

AUTHENTICATION CHALLENGE:
During your last session, did you (choose one):
(a) Receive email from your sister, Dorothy about her medical condition.
(b) Access your bank account 101000187-33400301
(c) Install a root kit onto 0F13C73AAB0D4E000028038C99D3125A
  [CONTINUE TO LOGIN]

about 4 months ago
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CES: Laser Headlights Edge Closer To Real-World Highways

cstacy Audi Hood Ornament (295 comments)

Audi should put a shark on the hood!

about 4 months ago
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Google Acquires Boston Dynamics

cstacy "By Your Command" (104 comments)

"The virtual version of Zoe was created by Zoe Graystone herself using hacked rudimentary emulation software capable of duplicating her own V-World avatar. Graystone programmed the copy - a perfect copy - with roughly 100 terabytes of personal information from other databases. This allowed the avatar to access and translate information from medical scans, DNA profiles, psychological evaluations, school records, emails, video and audio recordings, CAT scans, genetic typing, synaptic records, security cameras, test results, shopping records, talent shows, ballgames, traffic tickets, restaurant bills, phone records, music lists, movie tickets, TV shows and "even prescriptions for birth control" - essentially turning raw data into personality and memory." -- http://en.battlestarwiki.org/wiki/Zoe_Graystone

about 4 months ago
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NSA Collect Gamers' Chats and Deploy Real-Life Agents Into WoW and Second Life

cstacy Second Life (293 comments)

I remember this recycled story from around 2008. The Linden Lab executive (who was also one of their main system creators originally) hasn't been with the company now for many years. This was all eons ago, but it's being brought back up in the wake of Snowden. The part about Linden Dollars and the Second Life economy is a little ridiculous, since the money is only useful for buying in-game virtual items. For example, terrorists getting some better high heels for their avatars. You can cash out Linden Dollars, but there are lots of limits and monitors on it, and you cash out through either your verified PayPal account or a bank check mailed to you. Neither of those are in any way anonymous, and they are tightly monitored by the feds at multiple levels. (You could get some IP addresses and in-game transaction information from Linden Lab if you were tracing back some accumulated cash-out; that might be useful intelligence, I guess.) Like any glorified chat system. The idea that terrorists are using Second Life for virtual training is a bad joke. No realistic scenario or actions could be created. You could use the primitive in-game 3D modeling to create a rough representation of the buildings and alleys or whatever. But very little could be communicated beyond that. Avatars can't actually do anything subtle - mainly they can just walk. Arms and hands don't do anything except point-and-click on scripted objects in the world. The scripting can make objects change texture/color and move around. Communication is a very primitive text chat system plus an in-game Voice system that doesn't work very well or reliably. So you could make a really crappy diagramatic 3D model of your bomb scenario, and walk your avatars around it. But you could do infinitely better by just looking at a street map, or Google Earth, and tracing your fingers and talking about it or whatever. Linden Lab advertises that it keeps Chat logs (etc.) for some period, six months was what they said at one point. However, I asked someone there once and they said, "Well, we've' never actually deleted any logs to date." Second Life is an interesting experiment along a number of axis, but it's capabilities are really quite primitive. They tried at one point to sell it to businesses as an online meeting system, and it was such a bad joke they gave up that marketing effort. IBM has an open-source version of the system that is integrated with some other IBM meeting software. There are other service providers running "grids" with the open-source version of SL. You can download the server and client onto your laptop if you want to play with it stand-along (or hook together with some other users and make your own network). But it doesn't have any specially great utility for terrorists. Any more than any other MUD/MOO/Mush type system. That was all just hype, years ago, from when Second Life was exciting and hyped and not understood. NSA monitors AOL chat rooms and whatever, too; it's just exactly the same thing. They didn't understand that a half decade ago when this "news" article first came out.

about 4 months ago

Submissions

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LG Phone Giveaway Leaves 20 Injured

cstacy cstacy writes  |  about 8 months ago

cstacy (534252) writes "As a publicity stunt, LG attached vouchers for free smartphones (852$US) to 100 helium balloons for people to catch at a promotional event widely advertised on social media. Customers showed up with BB guns, knives on sticks, and other tools. With only about two dozen security guards, the frenzied crowd surged, the guns fired, the blades were wielded, and at the end of the day 20 people were injured; some had to be taken to the hospital.

A spokesman for LG was reportedly overheard to say, "As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly...""

Link to Original Source
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Google deletes Nav app from Android phones, customers bewildered and pissed

cstacy cstacy writes  |  about 9 months ago

cstacy (534252) writes "Google has removed the Navigation app from the Android smartphones, and released a new version of Google Maps (which they think replaces Nav). Customer response seems to be universally negative.

Maps is not an in-car navigation app like Nav. It doesn't have a UI suitable for use in a car, and lacks most of the significant features such as traffic alerting, ETA, alternate routes selection, plan/turn view toggling, and much more. Moreover, the new version of Maps apparently crashes all the time.

It's a breathtaking move on Google's part. Many people, like me, purchased their devices (mine's a Samsung Note 2) specifically because of the excellent Nav app provided on the ROM. People are really upset. No word from Google."

Link to Original Source
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Lax SSH key management a big problem

cstacy cstacy writes  |  about a year ago

cstacy (534252) writes "Tatu Yionen, inventor of SSH, says he feels "a moral responsibility" to come out of retirement and warn that a "little-noticed problem" could jeopardize the security of much of the world's confidential data. He is referring to the management (or lack thereof) of SSH keys (i.e. "authorized_keys") files. He suggests that most organizations simply allow the SSH key files to be created, copied, accumulated, and abandoned, all over their network, making easy pickings for intruders to gain access.

Do you think this is a widespread problem?
How does your company manage SSH keys?"
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No more "Asperger's Syndrome"

cstacy cstacy writes  |  about a year ago

cstacy (534252) writes "The American Psychiatric Association is dropping Asperger's Syndrome from the upcoming edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5).
It's symptoms will be included under the umbrella of Autism Spectrum Disorder, which includes everything from severe autism such as children who do not talk or interact, to milder forms of autism. Asperger's disorder is impairment in social interaction and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, activities and interests, without significant delay in language or cognitive development. Often the person has high intelligence and vast knowledge on narrow subjects but lacks social skills. DSM-5 comes out in May and will be the first major rewrite in 19 years."

Link to Original Source
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NASA: Nothing to see here...yet

cstacy cstacy writes  |  about a year ago

cstacy (534252) writes "NASA has announced that there is no announcement — the supposed tease of an amazing discovery, "one for the history books", was a quote taken out of context. Geographical evidence of water has already been found, but perhaps evidence of organics will still be found. Curiosity continues, at home and on the red planet."
Link to Original Source
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Confidential Police Confetti at Macy's Parade

cstacy cstacy writes  |  about a year ago

cstacy (534252) writes "The Nassau County (New York) Police Department is "very concerned" about reports that shreds of police documents (with social security numbers, phone numbers, addresses, license plate numbers, incident reports, and more) rained down as confetti in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. The documents also unveiled the identities of undercover officers, including their SSNs and bank information, according to WPIX-TV. Macy's has no idea how this happened, as they use commercial, colored confetti, not shredded paper."
Link to Original Source
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Ivan Sutherland wins Kyoto Prize

cstacy cstacy writes  |  about a year and a half ago

cstacy (534252) writes "The Inamori Foundation has awarded the Kyoto Prize to graphics pioneer Ivan Sutherland, for developing Sketchpad in 1963. The award recognizes significant technical, scientific and artistic contributions to the “betterment of mankind, and honors Sutherland him for nearly 50 years of demonstrating that computer graphics could be used “for both technical and artistic purposes.”"
Link to Original Source
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Apple Patent Invalidated

cstacy cstacy writes  |  about a year and a half ago

cstacy (534252) writes "Apple's "rubber band" scrolling patent has been provisionally invalidated by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). This patent was part of Apple's recent billion-dollar win against Samsung. The patent includes a number of touch screen gesture features (such as rotation); all 20 claims have been invalidated. Many of the claims have been ruled "obvious" and "anticipated". Is the PTO getting a clue?"
Link to Original Source
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Linkedin Passwords Breached

cstacy cstacy writes  |  about 2 years ago

cstacy (534252) writes "A Russian hacker has posted 118MB of (unsalted SHA-1) hashes for about 6.5 million Linkedin accounts, and people are finding theirs on the list. Linkedin says they are investigating but have found no evidence of a breach. According to Computerworld, the hashes are being cracked now. http://blogs.computerworld.com/20272/hackers_crowdsource_help_to_crack_nearly_6_5_million_leaked_linkedin_passwords?source=rss_blogs

  http://www.dagensit.no/article2411857.ece"

Link to Original Source
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Smithsonian Honors Inventory of Email

cstacy cstacy writes  |  more than 2 years ago

cstacy (534252) writes "The Smithsonian is honoring V.A. Shiva Ayyadurai, who invented email. The museum is launching an online exhibit of documentary materials showing how, as a 14 year old in 1978, he invented email and wrote the first software (including features such as the header lines To, From, CC, and BCC)

Numerous people have contacted the Washington Post, which ran the story last Friday, to inform them that email already existed before this. The paper has clarified that in addition to his story of being the inventor, "Ayyadurai holds the copyright to the computer program called 'email', establishing him as the creator of the 'computer program for [an] electronic mail system' with that name. (However, the Smithsonian itself still appears to be clueless.)"

Link to Original Source
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USPS ending overnight letters

cstacy cstacy writes  |  more than 2 years ago

cstacy (534252) writes "The United States Postal Service will be closing half of its processing centers this spring. Currently, 42% of first-class mail is delivered the following day for nearby residential and business customers. But that overnight mail will be a thing of the past, with delivery guaranteed only for 2-3 days. About 51% will be delivered in 2 days. Periodicals may take up to nine days. (Additional delays beyond this may come into play when Congress also authorizes USPS to close operations for some days each week.) Stamp prices will be going up in a few weeks. How long before the post office is a footnote in the history books?"
Link to Original Source
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French Nuclear Company Used Malware

cstacy cstacy writes  |  more than 2 years ago

cstacy (534252) writes "The head of security and his aide at Électricité de France, whose 66 nuclear power stations produces 22% of the electricity for the European Union, have been sentenced to prison for three years for spying on Greenpeace using trojan malware. Also, EDF is being hit one of the largest fines ever imposed by a court on a French corporation for any reason, 1.5 million euros.

In 2006, the power company employed Kargus Consultants to steal 1,400 documents from the computer of Yannick Jadot, the head of Greenpeace campaigns against nuclear power in France.

Meanwhile, the head of Kargus, Thierry Lorho, was also sentenced to three years in jail, while his technical expert and former secret service man, Alain Quiros, was given two years suspended. Earlier this week, Quiros was sentenced to six months in prison in a separate case for using the same malware, involving a French anti-doping lab, Floyd Landis, and the Tour De France in 2006."

Link to Original Source
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John McCarthy has died

cstacy cstacy writes  |  more than 2 years ago

cstacy (534252) writes "John McCarthy, who coined the term "Artificial Intelligence" and helped found the field, invented LISP, garbage collection, time-sharing, and made other seminal contributions to computing, has died at age 84."
Link to Original Source
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Is A Bad Economy Good For Social Networking Sites?

cstacy cstacy writes  |  more than 4 years ago

cstacy (534252) writes "In the present economic jobless "recovery" with rising unemployment, and many unemployed professionals no longer even being counted in the gloomy statistics, are more people turning to social networking to make job connections? Personal networking has always been the best way to find good jobs. This Mashable article http://mashable.com/2009/10/14/linkedin-50-millon/ cites a huge recent growth spurt in social networking, and this McKinsey article http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Organization/Talent/When_job_seekers_invade_Facebook_2317 also notices the trend. In the last few months I've had more people connecting to me on LinkedIn and Facebook, and a lot of them are recently unemployed. Do you see more people using SN for job seeking? And does it work? Or is it just more people giving away their personal info so that they can play Mafia Wars and Farmville?"
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Is A Bad Economy Good For Social Networking Sites?

cstacy cstacy writes  |  more than 4 years ago

cstacy (534252) writes "In the present economic jobless "recovery" with rising unemployment estimated at 10-17%, and many unemployed professionals no longer even being counted in the gloomy statistics, are more people turning to social networking to make job connections? Personal networking has always been the best way to find good jobs. This Mashable article http://mashable.com/2009/10/14/linkedin-50-millon/ cites a huge recent growth spurt in social networking. In the last few months I've had more people connecting to me on LinkedIn and Facebook, and a lot of them are recently unemployed. Do you see more people using SN for job seeking? And does it work? Or is it just more people giving away their personal info so that they can play Mafia Wars and Farmville?"
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"Terrorist" Hacker To Be Extradited from U

cstacy cstacy writes  |  more than 4 years ago

cstacy (534252) writes "The United States has been trying to extradite Gary McKinnon from the United Kingdom. He admits hacking into 97 military and NASA computers in 2001 and 2002. He insists he was looking for evidence of UFOs. Prosecuters say he committed the "biggest military computer hack of all time" and faces up to 70 years in prison. Today the High Court agrees he should be extradited, calling it "a lawful and proportionate response to his offending". His latest bud comes after unsuccessful appeals with House of Lords and the European Court of Human Rights. He can still appeal to the UK Supreme Court. His lawyer argues that the extradition treaty is for terrorists, and "Gary McKinnon is no terrorist." However, McKinnon did leave a rant on one of the computers he hacked: "US foreign policy is akin to government-sponsored terrorism these days? It was not a mistake that there was a huge security stand-down on September 11 last year...I am SOLO. I will continue to disrupt at the highest levels.""
Link to Original Source

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