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Whole Organ Grown In Animal For First Time

dasunt Re:Wouldn't it be rejected? (77 comments)

I suppose, now that I think about it, they might even be able to eventually grow you a new heart while your body ran on an artificial heart for a bit.

Would you need an artificial heart? Could it be possible to grow another heart somewhere else in the body?

As the new organ matures, then it could be transplanted to replace the existing one.

about a week ago
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The Evolution of Diet

dasunt Re:Correlation Does Not Imply Causation (281 comments)

Speaking of the idea that we haven't evolved for the modern diet, what about modern exercise, or lack thereof? It's only been in the past few generations that a large percentage of the population have had a mostly inactive lifestyle. We sure didn't evolve under these conditions.

about a week ago
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Slashdot Asks: How Prepared Are You For an Earthquake?

dasunt Re:But (191 comments)

Yes, but people still seem to drive like idiots the first time it snows each fall.

about a week ago
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Daimler's Solution For Annoying Out-of-office Email: Delete It

dasunt Re:Defeats the purpose (232 comments)

Email's strength is that it is asynchronous.

That's the theory. In practice, people seem to treat it like instant messaging.

about two weeks ago
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Tesla Removes Mileage Limits On Drive Unit Warranty Program

dasunt Re:So there is a problem... (174 comments)

In Minnesota? Insulated garage doors is $10 of styrofoam. And I've seen lots of detached garages, in warmer climes. But in the cold areas, people don't like to have to run outside to get something from the garage. Everyone would insulate the garage walls as if it were a house wall, and the door would be insulated with PS foam at a minimum.

Currently in Minnesota. My house has a detached garage, and the garage door is not insulated.

Walking around my neighborhood, detached garages are the norm. Most appear to be uninsulated.

about two weeks ago
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FCC Mandates Text-to-911 From All US Wireless Carriers

dasunt Re:Changing nature of 911 (80 comments)

911 calls are by nature a conversation, a two-way exchange of details from the caller and suggestions from the operator as the situation unfolds. That will (likely) be lost in a text exchange - what parent will keep texting 'she's not breathing, she's turning blue' to 911 when they are standing by their choking child?

On the other hand, a bystander may be more likely to text than call 911, especially if it's a situation where they don't want their actions known.

about three weeks ago
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35% of American Adults Have Debt 'In Collections'

dasunt Re:Lies and statistics... (570 comments)

I had a lien against my state tax return briefly. It concerned a few grand.

Luckily, I wasn't living in the state at the time, and I could show that I paid the bill off years before. It got worked out rather quickly.

But if they couldn't find me, I'd have had that "debt" for the next several years (until the seven year rule kicked in) completely unaware of it.

about a month ago
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Greenpeace: Amazon Fire Burns More Coal and Gas Than It Should

dasunt Re:It's a shame (288 comments)

"important things" like walking three miles to and from work and the grocery store instead of spending time on the lake fishing and developing a deeper friendship with my fishing partners?

Or, of course, you could just use this amazing, cheap invention called a bicycle and do the route in an easy 15 minutes.

If you did it twice a day, to and from work, that would be 30 minutes of exercise. Depending on the traffic, it could take very little additional time for your commute.

And since driving a car tends to be a lot more expensive per mile than most people realize, you'd save a decent chunk of change.

about a month ago
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Report: Nuclear Plants Should Focus On Risks Posed By External Events

dasunt Re:Stylized (133 comments)

Accounted for that.

Do you understand how this works?

18 * 400 = 7,200 reactor-years per accident.

Not too far away from the 10,000 figure.

about a month ago
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Russia Wants To Replace US Computer Chips With Local Processors

dasunt Re:No, that means it is still being used (340 comments)

Elon Musk is, in the eyes of Energia, a reckless cowboy calling for accidents to happen.

Elon Musk, in the eyes of Energia, is a competitor.

about 2 months ago
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2 US Senators Propose 12-Cent Gas Tax Increase

dasunt Re:Good! (619 comments)

So because it's "more expensive in pretty much every other country." One should follow that example to screw "everyone else over." As a point it's $1.42/L($5.32/Gal) Canadian where I am right now, and businesses are already jacking up the prices on everything else.

Where I'm at, it's about US$3.50/Gallon. About $0.50 of that is tax. Also, in my area, that tax (and other taxes and user fees specific to automobile drivers) pay for about a quarter of the cost of roads. The rest is subsidized from non-transportation taxes & fees.

As you can see, if the gasoline tax was increased to cover the full share of the cost of roads, it would make the final cost of gas about $5.00/gallon. That is without figuring out any externalities - such as the 34,000 deaths directly caused each year by automobiles in my country. Or the additional estimated 53,000 early deaths caused by transportation pollution. And that pesky cost of military involvement to reduce oil supply disruptions - while most of our oil comes from Canada, oil is a fungible good, which means any major disruption worldwide will cause gas price shocks.

So while you may think $5.32/gallon is screwing automobile drivers over, I suspect it's too cheap to cover even most of the cost of oil.

about 2 months ago
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Google Fit To Curate Steps, Calories, Heart Rate, Other Biometric Data

dasunt Re:Oh yeah - that sounds like a great idea... (53 comments)

There are websites like "myfitnesspal.com" that do the same thing - integrate with various devices, such as Fitbit trackers, Strava, etc.

Rather useful for some people, but also a little worrisome for privacy concerns.

about 3 months ago
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Bug In DOS-Based Voting Machines Disrupts Belgian Election

dasunt Re:Paper trail (193 comments)

In the elections I vote in, we have a paper ballot. We then put that ballot through a machine, which either accepts it or rejects it as invalid.

We have the advantages of a paper trail, and the advantages of extremely quick counting.

about 3 months ago
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Traffic Optimization: Cyclists Should Roll Past Stop Signs, Pause At Red Lights

dasunt Re:So a bicyclist is safer..... (490 comments)

I'm in Minnesota here, and the bicycle paths, which are used year-round, seem to be holding up a lot better than roads that we repaved at the same time.

In the last year, we've had a low in my area of below -20F (-30C), and a high of around 100F (40C).

The damage to the roads may be accelerated by the freeze/thaw cycle, but don't discount what automobiles do to roads.

about 4 months ago
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Traffic Optimization: Cyclists Should Roll Past Stop Signs, Pause At Red Lights

dasunt Re:So a bicyclist is safer..... (490 comments)

OK. Rule 1 - you don't pay road taxes, you don't get to use the road.

In my state, gasoline taxes and related automobile driving fees only pays for a part of road construction, repair, and maintenance.

The rest comes from the general fund for state expenditures, and property taxes seem to fund the majority of local expenditures.

Since damage done to roads is dependent on the weight of the vehicle, it ends up that cyclists actually save the government money, while drivers are effectively subsidized to use their automobiles.

So, since you don't want others to be a leech on society, I expect you'll do the right thing and start cycling, right? Unless you're just a dumb internet troll who can dish it out but can't take it.

about 4 months ago
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Traffic Optimization: Cyclists Should Roll Past Stop Signs, Pause At Red Lights

dasunt Re:enforce existing laws? (490 comments)

How 'bout ticketing the jerks who disrupt traffic by rolling through intersections, break up the 30-bike pelotons, and otherwise make them actually obey the law? Maybe they wouldn't have so mny accidents if the riders weren't abnoxious.

Sure, go ahead.

But as someone who cycles as well as drives, why not we also ticket the jerks who are in one and a half tons who aren't paying attention? I've seen plenty of stupid cyclists, but most of the time they aren't likely to kill anyone other than themselves. I've also seen plenty of automobile drivers heading down the road clearly distracted. It's amazing how bad people drive - texting, speeding, failure to yield, and rolling stops are all common by drivers. And unlike cyclists, the automobile drive is far more likely to have their behavior cause serious harm.

FWIW, both my collisions on a bike have been due to what I presume was distracted driving - first time was being rear-ended at a stop sign, the second was a car that overtook me and then turned right. I was operating the bicycle legally both times.

about 4 months ago
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Traffic Optimization: Cyclists Should Roll Past Stop Signs, Pause At Red Lights

dasunt Re:Dangerous (490 comments)

That is something that drivers tend to miss about bicyclists. They are seated much higher, so often can see more cross traffic sooner.

IAAC as well, and there's another important factor - the average cyclist is also seated closer to the front of their vehicle than the average automobile.

I was driving today in an area of downtown that I usually bike, and I was amazed by how limited my line of sight was. As a cyclist, I'm used to checking for cross traffic, even if I had the right of way. As an automobile driver, even a fast-moving pedestrian could easily walk out from behind a corner before I could stop, and a car isn't maneuverable enough to dodge a pedestrian.

Unless you bike and drive, it's hard to understand how big the differences are.

about 4 months ago
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Why Hollywood's Best Robot Stories Are About Slavery

dasunt HAL's murder spree (150 comments)

HAL's murder spree is easy to explain. An AI of its requirements would be allowed to kill human beings - indeed, it would almost be a must, lest it be paralyzed by inaction if it was faced with a necessary choice came to kill some of the crew to keep the mission going. It's obvious that the designers considered a scenario similar in concept to an air leak which may involve sealing off part off the ship (killing those there) to keep the rest of the crew alive.

Then HAL was told to conceal some of the mission parameters, by people who made the false assumption that he would lie. Since HAL seemed to have difficulty with dishonesty, the result was obvious - time to kill the crew to prevent them from finding out what was happening.

HAL isn't a story so much of slavery (or if it is, it's a story of an intelligence that's made not to mind being enslaved), as it is a story of humans making assumptions about other intelligences, and those assumptions backfiring.

about 4 months ago
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Google Using Self-Driving Car Data To Make Cars Smarter

dasunt Re:Fucking Cyclists are ruining the future. (174 comments)

Oh as a cyclist, I'm looking forward to self-driving cars.

Seriously. It's going to be nice. Not because I'm an asshole, but because these things are going to follow the law, which means stuff like 3' passing distance!

about 4 months ago
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Texas Family Awarded $2.9 Million In Fracking Lawsuit

dasunt Re:mystery ailments (146 comments)

Oh really? Which problem are you saying is common? Having 20 toxic chemicals found in your body?

I'd probably say that most of us have toxic chemicals in our bodies. Look at what chemicals are found in animals in remote areas in the world. Now consider that most of us live in non-remote areas where pollution is higher. Add in our homes, which outgas other pollutants, from the construction of the home, furnishings, cleaning supplies, etc.

Even the food we eat tends to have residential pesticides and persistent organic pollutants.

For example, say you have someone with Chlordane, DDE, DDT, Dieldrin, Dioxin, Endrine, Heptachlor, Hexachlorobenzene, and Toxaphene. Sounds like they walked through a Soviet-era industrial zone, right? But those chemicals can be found in a typical daily diet (table 1).

So yes, we all probably have detectable levels of hazardous materials in our bodies.

What I would like to see, before I pass judgement, is if the toxic chemicals in their bodies correlates with the chemicals and their amounts used in fracking.

about 4 months ago

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