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Herschel's First Science Results, Eagle Nebula

davecl Re:"Scientific rights"? WTF? (91 comments)

The actual numbers that go to make up these images are needed to do any science with them - only a fool would try to do science with a JPEG image, but this does happen. The 'scientific rights' refer to the use of the raw numbers for these images in scientific papers. These rights apply for about 1 year after the observations are taken so that the team that has spent years building the instrument and sorting out its science can benefit. This data then becomes completely public.

more than 4 years ago
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Herschel Releases First Images of Milky Way

davecl Re:why 70 and 160um? (55 comments)

In these images you're largely seeing thermal emission from dust at temperatures of about 20-50K. The wavebands chosen cover the peak of the black body spectrum at these temperatures so we can get an accurate measure of how warm of cold the dust is.

more than 4 years ago
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Planck Satellite Releases First Images

davecl Re:Plancks Scan Pattern Is Bad? (59 comments)

The poles of the scan are actually the ecliptic poles, perpendicular to the plane of the planets within the solar system. This is set by the fact that Planck rotates with it's bottom pointing towards the line that joins the earth and the sun from it's position at the second Lagrange point. This ensures that earth and sunlight never impinge on it's sensitive detectors and helps to keep the whole instrument as cold as possible. The scan geometry is thus quite tightly restricted by these requirements and, as you say, the deepest fields will be at the ecliptic poles.

We actually don't want to study the centre of the galaxy with Planck as the galaxy is the major foreground contaminant to the CMB data. Fortunately the eclptic poles aren't aligned wiht the centre of the galaxy.

more than 4 years ago
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Planck Satellite Releases First Images

davecl Re:I wish they'd post a bit of the sky from both.. (59 comments)

There's a lot more to do beyond Planck on polarization, but you're right that primary intensity anisotropies in the CMB will essentially be done by Planck. There are lots of secondary anisotropies, such as the SZ-Effect, on smaller scales to be done at higher resolution, though, and instruments like the SPT are doing exactly that.

more than 4 years ago
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Planck Satellite Releases First Images

davecl Re:Am I hopelessly geeky... (59 comments)

Planck is actually an ESA mission, not NASA. Though our US colleagues have made significant contributions the bulk of the funding, the launch etc. has come from Europe.

more than 4 years ago
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More First-Light Data From Herschel Space Telescope

davecl Re:Hershel vs. Hubble (21 comments)

Hubble works in the optical at wavelengths more than 100 times smaller than those Herschel is using, so it's not surprising you can see more detail. However, the Herschel images aren't showing stars at all, they're showing cool dust, just 50 or so degrees above absolute zero, material that Hubble just cannot see at all (and to be fair, Herschel can't see the stars that Hubble can see).

Trying to compare Hubble with Herschel is like comparing a fire with a bucket of liquid nitrogen.

more than 4 years ago
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First Light Images From Herschel Satellite Released

davecl Re:Tuning (35 comments)

Bias settings for the detectors, calibration, temperatures for the various cooling elements... There's a whole lot of things that need to be sorted out in the commissioning and 'performance verification' phases, and this is what we're spending the time between now and the first full-scale science observations in mid-October.

more than 4 years ago
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Patriot Act Dampening Cloud Computing?

davecl Safe Harbour (148 comments)

This issue has been running for a long time. In particular the different attitudes to the privacy of individuals' data in the US and the EU has blocked a lot of data being transferred from the EU to the US. This isn't the Patriot Act - the linked article dates back to before that was enacted. As an EU citizen I like it that my personal data can't just be bundled up and sold on from one company to another without my permission.

However, there are provisions under the Safe Harbour rules that allow data to be transferred to the US, so this shouldn't be a complete block to development or outsourcing. As long as companies, and government agencies, agree to abide by the rules. If they don't want to, that's their choice.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Andromeda Galaxy seen in a New Light

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 3 years ago

davecl (233127) writes "The European Space Agency has released new images of our nearest neighbour galaxy, the Andromeda Galaxy or M31, in both the far-infrared from Herschel and in X-rays from XMM. The Herschel images show regions where stars are forming and where starlight is hidden by dust while the X-Ray data reveals the cinders left when stars have died. Combined with existing optical data these images give us a picture of Andromeda as an active, evolving galaxy, where the action moves from pace to place over cosmic time. More information available from the Herschel mission blog (which I run) and form the BBC."
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First Full Science Results from Herschel

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 3 years ago

davecl (233127) writes "Today the first full science results from the Herschel Space Observatory were released, including results ranging from the formation and evolution of galaxies to the detailed physics of star formation. Details can be found from The European Space Agency, the BBC, and the Herschel mission blog that I help maintain. Briefer reports, covering rather more of the science, can also be found under the #eslab2010 hashtag on Twitter."
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Planck Mission releases Images of Galactic Dust

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 4 years ago

davecl (233127) writes "The Planck satellite has released its first new science images, showing the large scale filamentary structure of cold dust in our own galaxy. This release coincides with the completion of its first survey of the entire sky, a couple of weeks ago. There's lots more work to be done, and more observations to be made, before results are ready on the Big Bang, but these images demonstrate Planck's performance and capability. Read more on the Planck mission blog (which I maintain)."
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Herschel first science results: Eagle Nebula

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 4 years ago

davecl (233127) writes "Over the next three days many new science results will come out from Herschel. The first of these, a view deep inside the stellar nursery of the Eagle Nebula finds a huge amount of activity, revealing new stars and filaments of dust that could not have been detected by previous telescopes. Also open today is OSHI, the online showcase of Herschel images where all the new science images will be found. Herschel news also available on the Herschel Mission Blog."
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Herschel Spectroscopy of future Supernova

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 4 years ago

davecl (233127) writes "ESA's Herschel Space Telescope has released its first spectroscopic results. These include observations of VYCMa, a star 50 times as massive as the sun and soon to become a supernova, as well a nearby galaxy, more distant colliding starburst galaxies and a comet in our own solar system. The spectra show more lines than have ever been seen in these objects in the far-infrared and will allow astronomers to work out the detailed chemistry and physics behind star and planet formation as well as the last stages of stellar evolution before VYCMa's eventual collapse into a supernova. More coverage at the Herschel Mission Blog which I run."
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Herschel Releases First Images of Milky Way

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 4 years ago

davecl (233127) writes "The Herschel space observatory has just released stunning five colour images of a section of our own galaxy showing the complex twisted structures of the interstellar medium that drive star and planet formation. The images are the first produced using two of Herschel's instruments, SPIRE and PACS, simultaneously and show the power of this approach. This image is just 2x2 degrees in size, but future Herschel programmes will image the entire galactic plane at this sensitivity and resolution. Full scale science operations with Herschel begin in just a few weeks. More information on the project can be found from ESA, from the mission blog (which I contribute to) and from the SPIRE instrument team. The BBC are also covering this story."
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Planck Satellite Releases First Images

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 4 years ago

davecl (233127) writes "The Planck Satellite has released its first images. These are from the 'First Look Survey' and show a strip of the sky scanned at a range of radio and submillimetre wavelengths. The results are already better than what was seen by the previous microwave background satellite, WMAP. ESA's coverage of the results can be found here, with more details and images available in English and French. The Planck Mission Blog contains more details of the project and continuing coverage. I maintain the mission blog but even I am impressed with these first images!"
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HIFI Instrument on Herschel Space Telescope has pr

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 4 years ago

davecl (233127) writes "One of the three instruments on the Herschel satellite, HIFI, has hit a glitch. Nature is reporting that damage to the power supply for the HIFI instrument's control electronics has forced it to shut down. A possible cause is a hit by a rare very high energy cosmic ray, but investigations are proceeding. The other two Herschel instruments, PACS and SPIRE, are unaffected and are operating normally. Once the problem with HIFI is better understood it can switch over to the backup electronics, but there's only one spare. HIFI is the high resolution spectrometer for Herschel, allowing detailed study, for example, of forming stellar and planetary systems. More news of the Herschel mission can also be found on the mission blog."
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Herschel Space Telescope releases First Light Data

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 4 years ago

davecl writes "First light images and spetctra have now been released for all three of the instruments on Herschel. The news is covered on the BBC, on the ESA website on the Herschel mission blog and elsewhere. The data all looks fantastic, and is especially impressive since the satellite was only launched about 7 weeks ago. I work on the SPIRE instrument and help maintain the blog but even I'm astounded by the amount of information in the SPIRE images!"
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First Light Images from Herschel Satellite Release

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 4 years ago

davecl writes "The first images from the Herschel satellite have been released by ESA. The images are of the galaxy M51 and show a lot of structure and other features never seen before. Coverage of these results can be found on the ESA website and on the Herschel mission blog. There's a lot of work still to be done on tuning the satellite and instruments for optimum performance, but these very early results already show the promise of this mission. I work on this project and can say that these results are really impressive at this early stage!"
Link to Original Source
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Herschel space telescope opens for the first time

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 4 years ago

davecl writes "The Herschel space telescope, the largest ever launched into space, has opened its instrument cover allowing its three instruments to observe for the first time. BBC news has a story here while there is more coverage on the SPIRE instrument team website here and on the mission blog here. I'm part of the SPIRE instrument team and the excitement as we move towards our first observations is building fast. The PACS and SPIRE instruments will see first light in the next few days."
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ESA Selects Next Generation Space Missions

davecl davecl writes  |  more than 6 years ago

davecl writes "The European Space Agency has announced the results of its Cosmic Visions 2015-2025 call for proposals. Fifty space science missions for the next decade were proposed, with just seven selected. They range from X-ray and far-infrared observatories to planet finders and a near-earth asteroid sample return mission. These seven, together with the LISA gravitational wave observatory, will go ahead for further study in the next few years, and then two will be chosen for launch in 2015-2017."
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