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NSA Trying To Build Quantum Computer

daveschroeder Who would be surprised by this? (221 comments)

One of NSA's chief missions is breaking encryption. So (for the US folks among us) it's okay when it's the German or Japanese codes in WWII, but somehow sinister when the reality is that much of the world now shares the same tools, systems, services, networks, encryption standards, etc.?

In a free society governed by the rule of law, it is not the capability, but the law, that is paramount. And for all of the carping and hand-wringing about what NSA is doing because its capabilities continue to be laid bare, where is the worry about what states like China and Russia are doing?

about 7 months ago
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Mediterranean Sea To Possibly Become Site of Chemical Weapons Dump

daveschroeder They're destroyed first...that's the whole idea (174 comments)

The whole idea is that the chemical weapons are destroyed FIRST...they are being destroyed AT SEA, not "destroyed" by simply dumping them into the ocean.

The fact that the other blog entries hosted at the same site as TFA include:

- Rihanna Displays Illuminati Hand Gesture at Latest Music Award Performance

- SSDI Death Index: Sandy Hook 'Shooter' Adam Lanza Died One Day Before School Massacre?

- 15 Citizens Petition to Secede from the United States

- Will U.S. Troops Fire On American Citizens?

- Illuminati Figurehead Prince William Takes the Stage with Jon Bon Jovi and Taylor Swift

- Has the Earth Shifted â" Or Is It Just Me?

- Mexican Government Releases Proof of E.T.'s and Ancient Space Travel ...should give you a hint as to the veracity of the content. (And yes, I realize it's simply a blog site with a variety of authors and content.)

As should the first comment, from "LibertyTreeBud", saying:

"Why not add it to some new vaccine? Or, perhaps add it to the drinking water and feed it to the live stock? These creatures will do anything for profits. Lowest bidder mentality rules."

What "creatures", exactly? The international organization explicitly charged with the prohibition and destruction of chemical weapons? What alternatives are people suggesting, exactly?

If you want a real article discussing this situation factually, not the tripe linked in the summary, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-25146980

about 8 months ago
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Astronaut Chris Hadfield Performs Space Oddity On the ISS

daveschroeder Um... (212 comments)

...he's Canadian.

And stop being so cynical. Sometimes stuff can be cool without being "viral marketing".

about a year ago
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Biometric Database Plans Hidden In Immigration Bill

daveschroeder Utility (365 comments)

It turns out that having a universal unique idenitifier is really handy. There are reasons you WANT to be able to be affirmatively and uniquely identified as "you", but you want that capability under your own control. Even with PKI (a system that could be trusted, anyway), someone has to hold a central database. Guess who that would likely be? And if it shouldn't be "the government", then who?

about a year ago
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DoD Descends On DEFCAD

daveschroeder Or, for people who want to provide it to Americans (496 comments)

...just do the same thing we do with cryptographic tools that are considered munitions, which is ensure they aren't exported, and make efforts to provide/limit them to US persons instead of making it freely downloadable for anyone.

about a year ago
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DoD Descends On DEFCAD

daveschroeder Re:That's not at all the point (496 comments)

Yes, it is about "controlling firearm dissemination"...for EXPORT. That's why the State Department Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance is involved. If you've already made up your mind that the true motive relates somehow to American citizens in a country with as many privately owned firearms as people, no amount of logic or reason will change your mind.

about a year ago
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The NSA's Own Guide To Google Hacking and Other Internet Research

daveschroeder Re:This is not some sort of definitive guide (45 comments)

No, then it would have a classification marker struck from it. This document was never classified, but it was also never released publicly.

about a year ago
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DoD Descends On DEFCAD

daveschroeder That's not at all the point (496 comments)

The point isn't that DOD thinks the files are going to disappear, and it doesn't matter anyway since the purpose isn't to "disarm Americans" or "keep the files out of the hands of Americans" or some other utter garbage.

There are treaties and various arms control export restrictions (ITAR) at stake, and US-based corporations or entities cannot provide arms in violation of these constructs. If this sort of thing is on the Pirate Bay or elsewhere, DOD trade control doesn't care.

about a year ago
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The NSA's Own Guide To Google Hacking and Other Internet Research

daveschroeder This is not some sort of definitive guide (45 comments)

It was a guide for open source research, published by one office from 1997 to 2007, and not updated in the last six years. Remember that before you rail on it.

about a year ago
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Crowdsourcing Failed In Boston Bombing Aftermath

daveschroeder Re:Some other relevant stories (270 comments)

Yes, and just like eyewitnesses to an accident, it's shown that such "points of view" are often wrong or misinterpreted.

Just one example of many: the statements by people near the Pentagon on 9/11 that it "sounded like a missile". How many of those people have actually ever even *heard* what a commercial jetliner sounds like traveling at nearly cruising speed just hundreds to dozens of feet off the ground "sounds like", much less a missile? This is then used as "proof" that it couldn't have been a plane, and probably was a "missile", despite all evidence to the contrary (including numerous statements from people saying they clearly saw the plane, sometimes in the same sentence as the cherry-picked quotes where they say it "sounded like a missile").

This is why we have professionally trained (usually) journalists and experts, because they do the filtering and analysis for us. I'm sorry, but NO individual is capable, his or her self, of becoming an authority on everything related to every major event that occurs with the end result being better analysis than what has already been done by investigators and task forces of experts. Sure, have a questioning mind and all that, but don't assume everyone in the "media" or the "government" is always lying to you, and random, out-of-context, and/or misinterpreted (or outright wrong) assertions by "citizen journalists" (or anyone else) are gospel.

about a year ago
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Crowdsourcing Failed In Boston Bombing Aftermath

daveschroeder Re:crowsourcing did NOT fail - here's why (270 comments)

You're acting as if information was "withheld"...it wasn't. There is no mechanism to release every single piece of evidence collected by every agency to the internet and "crowdsource" it.

What was "crowdsourced" was information that was already on the internet. Furthermore, the FBI did, in fact, release the relevant snippets of video and pictures from the private security cameras and other sources.

Sorry, but "crowdsourcing" is not always the answer, and this was not a success, much less a rousing one.

about a year ago
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Crowdsourcing Failed In Boston Bombing Aftermath

daveschroeder Some other relevant stories (270 comments)

This has been a fascinating phenomenon, and it's only going to evolve more as time goes on.

Crowdsourcing or witch hunt? Reddit, 4chan users try to ID Boston bomb suspects

Boston bombing: How internet detectives got it very wrong

'I didn't do anything!' High school track runner forced to deny involvement in Boston Marathon bombings after a picture of him and his coach is widely circulated

Social media as breaking-news feed: Worse information, faster

Worse information, faster -- this neatly sums it up, and I'm a huge proponent of social media and its benefits, including to government.

And for the record, no, the FBI wasn't seeking to "censor" anyone, and the "next logical step" (as I have seen asserted elsewhere) won't be to "shut down" internet or social media resources during major public emergencies; however, law enforcement agencies absolutely can request, once they have identified suspects via investigative and legal processes, that people focus on those instead of playing CSI: Internet.

Sadly, the echo chamber of the internet enables some people, in seemingly increasing numbers, to go a step further and choose to believe everything is automatically a "false flag" conspiracy with the stated perpetrators "framed"â¦..

The "wisdom of crowds" can be a misnomer.

about a year ago
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Massive Data Leak Reveals How the Ultra Rich Hide Their Wealth

daveschroeder Re:Note this is not the "top 1%" (893 comments)

Sure, but those people aren't the ones who are the source of our problems. For what it's worth, from 2011 IRS data:

Category..........Top 0.1%....1%....5%...10%..25%..50%..Bot 50%
Income Req'd $........1.4M..344K..155K..112K..66K..32K....N/A
Income Share %...........8....17....32....43...66...87.....13
Effective tax rate %....24....24....20....18...15...12......2
Income tax share %......17....37....59....70...87...98......2

Also, you're comparing apple to oranges by saying that "you could [...] save enough in about 4-5 years to stop working and still be making 10 times what your average American makes." No, because they already have the income they have, and they have a different lifestyle -- and guess what? They haven't done anything wrong.

The place where anything that can be defined as actual unfair "abuse" is occurring is in the 0.01% and up, and it's not even all of those people. To wholesale target the "top 1/5/10%" as evil or the cause of our problems ignores the fact that the top 10% -- who themselves are making over $100,000/year -- are paying 70% of the federal income tax share.

Even if we could have the bottom, say, 50%, or even the bottom *90%* pay NO tax of any kind, including payroll, sales, or anything else, and shift that ENTIRE burden to the top 10% (which is absurd, but let's just roll with it for the sake of argument), there would still be a massive wealth disparity. The very poor would still be very poor.

What then? True wealth redistribution? I'm sorry, but no matter how noble that might be in the view of some, that is simply not compatible with a free society. That's the problem people have with this whole "the top 1% is evil" and/or "has more than they deserve" trope. It's not your business how much someone else has. Surely you can do with less; shall we take it away? Of course not.

What we should be targeting is actual ABUSE and people who are getting off scot-free...and hint, it's not the vast, vast, vast majority of people in the top 1%. So what happens when a certain element of the top 0.00X% are essentially flouting the system and operating outside the bounds of any of the regulations and laws to which the rest of are beholden? Apparently if we ask the Occupy crowd, it's to attack everyone who appears to have more than you as the enemy.

about a year ago
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Massive Data Leak Reveals How the Ultra Rich Hide Their Wealth

daveschroeder Re:Note this is not the "top 1%" (893 comments)

Actually, I know exactly where Occupy (née OWS) came from: the anti-US, anti-capitalist, anti-"consumerist", "culture-jamming" Canadian magazine Adbusters, which openly stated that the goal was to ride the discontent in the wake of the economic downturn to turn people against the "rich", in the form of the "top 1%".

They made absolutely no secrets about it, and were proud of it. The fact that the "Occupy" movement spread to places outside of the US is irrelevant, and happened after AdBusters seeded and initiated the movement within the US.

about a year ago
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Massive Data Leak Reveals How the Ultra Rich Hide Their Wealth

daveschroeder Note this is not the "top 1%" (893 comments)

These are the kinds of people the Occupy crowd always railed on as the "top 1%". They may be /in/ the top 1%, but they're nowhere representative of it. These people are, quite literally, less than the top 1% /of/ the top 1%.

Of course, the Occupy folks don't care about this, as their true, stated aim was simply opposing capitalism, "consumerism", and pitting Americans against Americans in some kind of imagined class warfare, when the vast majority of the "top 1% are the employers and business owners who are part of the solution, not the imagined fat cats on yachts in top hats sipping champagne and lighting cigars with 100s.

about a year ago
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Blink! Google Is Forking WebKit

daveschroeder Ugh...great (252 comments)

We could always count on WebKit being the universal web rendering engine across iOS and Android -- now, that will no longer be the case, and I guarantee you there will be instances where Google uses the inevitable differences between "Blink" and WebKit (which is also the core rendering engine for Mac OS X and Safari) for competitive advantage with Chrome, Chrome OS, and Android, al la Microsoft and IE... :-/

about a year ago
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Nuclear Power Prevents More Deaths Than It Causes

daveschroeder Old news (599 comments)

Nuclear power has the lowest deaths per TWh of any form of energy -- and that includes things like Chernobyl and Fukushima, the latter of which had a curious focus given that far, far, far more people were injured, displaced, or killed by the actual tsunami as opposed to any radiation events, now or in the future.

Direct deaths from fossil fuel sources -- including even naturally occurring radiation from conventional fossil fuel energy sources -- far outstrip any deaths that have ever occurred, or even will occur with even the most extreme statistical projections, from any nuclear power source, including accidents. That's right: there are more deaths from "radiation" from the byproducts of fossil fuel sources than there are from nuclear power, including accidents and waste.

This is what we should be worried about:

"Outdoor air pollution contributed to 1.2 million premature deaths in China in 2010, nearly 40 percent of the global total, according to a new summary of data from a scientific study on leading causes of death worldwide. Figured another way, the researchers said, China's toll from pollution was the loss of 25 million healthy years of life from the population."

There is a reason China has 30 nuclear plants under construction, while the US just approved its first new plant in 30 years.

about a year ago

Submissions

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Space Shuttle Endeavour's Final Journey

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  about 2 years ago

daveschroeder writes "After over 296 days in space, nearly 123 million miles traveled, Space Shuttle Endeavour (OV-105) is making its final journey — on the streets of Los Angeles. The last Space Shuttle to be built, the contract for Endeavour was awarded on July 31, 1987. Endeavour first launched on May 7, 1992, launched for the last time on May 16, 2011, and landed for the final time on June 1, 2011. Endeavour then took to the skies aboard the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), completing the final ferry flight and the final flight of any kind in the Space Shuttle Program era with an aerial grand tour of southern California escorted by two NASA Dryden Flight Research Center F/A-18 aircraft on September 21, 2012. This morning around 1:30AM Pacific Time, Endeavour began another journey, this one on the ground. All Space Shuttles have traveled via road from Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, CA, to Edwards Air Force Base, but this time a Space Shuttle is taking to the streets of Los Angeles for the journey from Los Angeles International Airport to its final home at the California Science Center. Getting the shuttle through LA surface streets is a mammoth logistical challenge as it lumbers along at 2 mph to the cheers of onlookers. Watching Endeavour make the journey is a sight to be seen! Thank you, Endeavour!"
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Pandemic bird flu research published

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 2 years ago

daveschroeder writes "After a marathon debate over a pair of studies that show how the avian H5N1 influenza virus could become transmissible in mammals, and an unprecedented recommendation by the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB) to block publication, and its subsequent reversal, a study by Yoshihiro Kawaoka at the University of Wisconsin–Madison was finally and fully published today in the journal Nature. The full journal article: Experimental adaptation of an influenza H5 HA confers respiratory droplet transmission to a reassortant H5 HA/H1N1 virus in ferrets."
Link to Original Source
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Stratfor Is a Joke, and So Is Wikileaks for Taking It Seriously

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  about 2 years ago

daveschroeder (516195) writes "Max Fisher writes in The Atlantic: "The corporate research firm has branded itself as a CIA-like "global intelligence" firm, but only Julian Assange and some over-paying clients are fooled. [...] The group's reputation among foreign policy writers, analysts, and practitioners is poor; they are considered a punchline more often than a source of valuable information or insight. [...] So why do Wikileaks and their hacker source Anonymous seem to consider Stratfor, which appears to do little more than combine banal corporate research with media-style freelance researcher arrangements, to be a cross between CIA and Illuminati? The answer is probably a combination of naivete and desperation."
Link to Original Source
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India mobile handset backdoor memo (probably) a fa

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 2 years ago

daveschroeder (516195) writes "In the wake of previous coverage alleging that Apple, Nokia, RIM, and others have provided Indian government with backdoors into their mobile handsets — which itself spawned a US investigation and questions about handset security — it turns out the memo which ignited the controversy is probably a fake designed to draw attention to the "Lords of Dharmaraja." According to Reuters, "Military and cyber-security experts in India say the hackers may have created the purported military intelligence memo simply to draw attention to their work, or to taint relations between close allies India and the United States." Apple has already denied providing access to the Indian government."
Link to Original Source
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Supreme Court unanimously upholds NASA JPL backgro

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 3 years ago

daveschroeder (516195) writes "Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have been fighting background check requirements mandated under Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12 (HSPD-12) since 2007. HSPD-12 is designed to implement a "common identification standard for federal employees and contractors." A standard federal background check is a part of this process. This process is standardized by the federal Office of Personnel Management (OPM), even for employees who have no access to classified information. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals provisionally agreed with the employees, and the case worked its way to the US Supreme Court. Now the justices have unanimously ruled that JPL scientists must submit to background checks if they want to keep their jobs. Justice Antonin Scalia wrote in his concurrence that, "The contention that a right deeply rooted in our history and tradition bars the government from ensuring that the Hubble telescope is not used by recovering drug addicts farcical," and continued that "that there is no constitutional right to 'informational privacy'.""
Link to Original Source
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Why WikiLeaks Is Unlike the Pentagon Papers

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 3 years ago

daveschroeder (516195) writes "The recent release of classified State Department cables has often been compared to the Pentagon Papers. Daniel Ellsberg, the US military analyst who leaked the Pentagon Papers, has said he supports WikiLeaks, and sees the issues as similar. Floyd Abrams is the prominent First Amendment attorney and Constitutional law expert who represented the New York Times in the landmark New York Times Co. v. United States (403 U.S. 713 (1971)) Supreme Court case, which allowed the media to publish the Pentagon Papers without fear of government censure. Today, Abrams explains why WikiLeaks is unlike the Pentagon Papers, and how WikiLeaks is negatively impacting journalism protections: "Mr. Ellsberg himself has recently denounced the 'myth' of the 'good' Pentagon Papers as opposed to the 'bad' WikiLeaks. But the real myth is that the two disclosures are the same.""
Link to Original Source
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Woman gets Ubuntu, drops out of school

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 5 years ago

das writes "A Wisconsin student recently ordered a new Dell laptop, planning to enroll in online courses at a local community college. However, she ordered her laptop with the Ubuntu Linux option. When she realized that it wouldn't ship with Windows, she called back Dell, which said there was still time to change her order. But she claims that Dell discouraged her, saying that "Ubuntu was great, college students loved it, it was compatible with everything I needed." So her computer arrived with Ubuntu. Then she realized that her Windows-only "Verizon High-Speed Internet CD" wouldn't load (no software needs to be loaded to use Verizon DSL), and unable to install Microsoft Office, a requirement for her online courses (the laptop shops with OpenOffice, fully compatible with Microsoft Office), she dropped out of the fall and spring semesters. This article — which prompted a firestorm of criticism — may be humorous, but it raises a bigger question about the acceptance of Linux. This computer, with Ubuntu, would handle everything she needs easily — email, web, and Microsoft Office-compatible documents. But when the perception is that Windows and its trappings are mandatory, how can that be reasonably countered?"
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New report on NSA released today

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 5 years ago

daveschroeder writes "George Washington University has today released a three volume history of its activities during the Cold War. Written by agency historian Thomas R. Johnson, the 1000-page report, "Cryptology during the Cold War, 1945-1989", details some of the agency's successes and failures, its conflict with other intelligence agencies, and the questionable legal ground on which early American cryptologists worked. The report remained classified for years, until Johnson mentioned it to Matthew Aid, an intelligence historian, at an intelligence conference. Aid and the George Washington University's National Security Archive joined forces to obtain the report — intended for internal agency consumption only — from the NSA. Two years later, an abstract and the three current volumes of the report are now available via the George Washington University National Security Archive in PDF format. Aid, a National Security Archive visiting fellow Matthew and author of the forthcoming history "The Secret Sentry: The Top Secret History of the National Security Agency", says Johnson's study shows "refreshing openness and honesty, acknowledging both the NSA's impressive successes and abject failures during the Cold War." A fourth volume remains classified."
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Insurrection Act back to the way it was in 1807

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 6 years ago

daveschroeder writes "Back in 2006, there was much controversy about changes to the Insurrection Act of 1807 in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, giving the President additional specific abilities to deploy federal or state national guard troops within the United States during major public emergency situations. Some interpreted this as discarding the Posse Comitatus Act of 1878, when the text of Posse Comitatus always contained an explicit exemption for "Act[s] of Congress", and the Insurrection Act had allowed the deployment of troops within the US by the President in certain exigent circumstances for two centuries. Nevertheless, the changes were met with criticism and misunderstanding. In any event, the changes have been repealed in their entirety several months ago, in Section 1068 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008. This brings the text of all sections back to their original 1807 wording. There was a great deal of coverage about these changes when they occurred. Why is there not a similar level of coverage of the repeal, even months later?"
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Iran may shut down internet during election

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 6 years ago

daveschroeder writes "The Iranian government might block private access to the Internet for the general legislative election on March 14, two Iranian news outlets reported Monday. In 2006, the authorities banned download speeds on private computers faster than 128 kilobytes per second. The government also uses sophisticated filtering equipment to block hundreds of Web sites and blogs that it considers religiously or politically inappropriate. Many bloggers have been jailed in the past years, and dozens of Web sites have been shut down. It would appear that Iran's own government is more a threat to the nation's internet connectivity than the fragility of the undersea cable network. (Slashdot readers may recall assertions, dismissed by undersea cable experts, that the cable cuts were a deliberate attempt to sever Iran's connectivity, which, contrary to popular belief, also never happened.)"
Link to Original Source
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Apple issues warning on iPhone unlocking

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 6 years ago

daveschroeder writes "Today Apple issued a statement which says, "Apple has discovered that many of the unauthorized iPhone unlocking programs available on the Internet cause irreparable damage to the iPhone's software, which will likely result in the modified iPhone becoming permanently inoperable when a future Apple-supplied iPhone software update is installed." This does not include "hacking" the phone to install third party applications or ringtones, only unlocking the phone. This is because unlocking changes the baseband radio firmware, which is expected to be updated along with the next iPhone update to address other issues. Apple adds, "This has nothing to do with proactively disabling a phone that is unlocked or hacked. It's unfortunate that some of these programs have caused damage to the iPhone software, but Apple cannot be responsible for...those consequences." While unlocking a phone is legal for an end user under a current DMCA exemption, the vendor is under no obligation to guarantee the phone will remain as such when official software updates are applied; many users of unlocked handsets simply never update the phone, but the iPhone is in a different category. It is likely that since the current unlocking mechanisms use a broader buffer overflow condition, this will also be fixed in the next software update.

Note to editors: the already-submitted story in the firehose is remarkably incorrect (has NOTHING to do with "hacking", just unlocking), so please don't accept it."
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iPhones not flooding wireless LAN at Duke

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  about 7 years ago

Dave Schroeder writes "On the heels of the recent story about iPhones flooding the wireless LAN at Duke, it has been determined that it wasn't iPhones at all. Duke has issued a statement explaining that the issue was a Cisco-based network issue, for which Cisco has provided a fix. MacDailyNews has more coverage and commentary, asking, "So, does Duke University owe Apple recompense for hundreds of damaging articles that blamed Apple's iPhone for Duke's Cisco problem?""
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Apple and AT&T announce iPhone service plans

daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 7 years ago

daveschroeder writes "Apple and AT&T today announced service plans for iPhone, 4 days before its release in the US at 6pm local time on Friday, June 29. The plans are $59.99/mo for 450 minutes, $79.99 for 900 minutes, and $99.99 for 1350 minutes, and all include unlimited data, 200 SMS messages, rollover minutes, and unlimited mobile-to-mobile calling. Any other standard AT&T service plan may also be used. A two year service plan is required, with a $175 cancellation fee if terminated early. In addition, activations are done via iTunes, so only the hardware is purchased in the store. Interestingly, activation of a contract via iTunes is required to enable the iPod/syncing functionality of the phone as well. (It will remain to be seen whether there are workarounds for this for those who only want the iPod functionality of iPhone, and whether the iPhone is easily unlockable for those who wish to try it on alternate carriers, and so on.)"
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daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 7 years ago

das writes "Apple CEO Steve Jobs has posted his thoughts on music, DRM, and online media distribution as a whole. Jobs provides a brief history of the iTunes Music Store, some breakdowns of the origins of music on iPods, and some arguments why Apple had to deploy iTunes Music Store commercial content with DRM. Jobs then goes on to offer some alternatives for going forward. The option he seems to support is abolishing DRM entirely, saying, "Imagine a world where every online store sells DRM-free music encoded in open licensable formats. In such a world, any player can play music purchased from any store, and any store can sell music which is playable on all players. This is clearly the best alternative for consumers, and Apple would embrace it in a heartbeat. [...] Why would the big four music companies agree to let Apple and others distribute their music without using DRM systems to protect it? The simplest answer is because DRMs haven't worked, and may never work, to halt music piracy. [...] [W]hat benefits do [music companies] get from selling [online] music encumbered with a DRM system? There appear to be none. [...] Convincing [a major music label] to to license their music to Apple and others DRM-free will create a truly interoperable music marketplace. Apple will embrace this wholeheartedly." It appears that Apple isn't interested in iTunes Music Store lock-in after all."
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daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 7 years ago

das writes "The US Justice Department says it is granting the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, under FISA, authority to monitor the controversial domestic wiretapping program. "As a result of these orders, any electronic surveillance that was occurring as part of the Terrorist Surveillance Program will now be conducted subject to the approval of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. [...] Accordingly, under these circumstances, the President has determined not to reauthorize the Terrorist Surveillance Program when the current authorization expires," Attorney General Alberto Gonzales wrote in the letter obtained by the Associated Press. All future requests will be routed through the FISA court, and the administration says it already has approved one request for monitoring the communications of a person believed to be linked to a terrorist group."
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daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 7 years ago

das writes "On the same day as the launch of the Month of Apple Bugs (MOAB) (blog), Landon Fuller, a programmer, Darwin developer, and former engineer in Apple's BSD Technology Group, has launched an effort to provide runtime fixes for each MOAB issue as they are released. A fix has already been posted for the first issue. Additionally, security researcher and MOAB co-presenter Kevin Finisterre of Digital Munition has further outlined some of the motivations for MOAB. Perhaps a good name for the runtime fix project might be be the Month of Apple Fixes?"
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daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 7 years ago

daveschroeder writes "The Intel-based Xserve is now available for order and configuration on the Apple Store for retail and education/federal buyers. This quad-Xeon based 1U server features two dual-core Xeon 5100 Series processors at up to 3GHz, up to 32GB ECC RAM, up to 2.25TB internal SATA (or SAS) storage, dual GigE, dual 8-lane PCIe (one PCI-X), FireWire 400 and 800, USB 2.0, DB-9 serial, optional dual power supplies, and standard integrated graphics. The new Xserve starts at $2999 retail or $2699 education/government."
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daveschroeder daveschroeder writes  |  more than 7 years ago

daveschroeder writes "Apple has just announced the upgraded MacBook Pro (15.4- and 17-inch models) with the Intel Core 2 Duo ("Conroe") 64-bit dual core processor. The standard hard drive sizes have been increased, a FireWire 800 port has been added to all models (again, reaffirming that FireWire, and specifically FireWire 800, is not dead, and that Apple responded to customer requests to add it to the 15.4-inch model), and the optical drive is now dual-layer-write-capable on all models. For detailed specs, see this page."

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