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Running Google Android On iPhone Clones

derek_farn Also available under Windows Mobile (191 comments)

Where is the news? Android is also available on the commercially available phones running Windows Mobile, eg HTC Kaiser.

more than 5 years ago
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Stanford Teaching MBAs How To Fight Open Source

derek_farn Read the paper here (430 comments)

The paper is freely available for everybody to learn from, in fact the Jan-Feb 2008 issue is fully of very interesting article (what month are we in now?).

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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In game behavior a small subset of possibilities

derek_farn derek_farn writes  |  more than 3 years ago

derek_farn writes "A group of physics grad students at Cornell have found that some players of a game with over 10^100 combinations can successfully predict the behavior of other players well enough to beat the majority of them. With such a huge number of possibilities it is surprising that people use such a small number of playing strategies.

Colonel Blotto is a game in which players assign soldiers to fields. In this implementation there are 10 fields and 100 soldiers. You must specify how many soldiers to send to each of the 10 fields. You don't know what the opposing general will do. Then, in each field, the soldiers face off: whoever has more soldiers wins the battle. Whoever wins more battles wins the war.

For example, a one strategy is "10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10" and another is "1 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11". The second strategy will lose in the first field, but win the other 9, and therefore win the war."

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Interesting numbers in code tell a story

derek_farn derek_farn writes  |  more than 4 years ago

derek_farn writes "The numeric literals contained in code provide a lot of useful information about the algorithms used and the application domain being targeted. A new Wiki aims to collect interesting and distinctive numbers likely to be seen in source code and allows anybody to add new numbers; the 'numbers' program is the first tool to match this collection of numbers against numeric literals extracted files, it supports fuzzy matching and can print unmatched values.

One surprising is the extent to which large code bases contain many different values for Pi and sometimes leave off a digit (e.g., #define pi 3.1459265 in core/Helix.cpp of MIFIT)."

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Intel's compilers must not favor Intel products

derek_farn derek_farn writes  |  more than 4 years ago

derek_farn writes "The FTC have filed an antitrust complaint against Intel that requires them to release an updated version of their compilers that do not check whether the compiled code is executing on a "GenuineIntel" processor before deciding whether to go down a go-faster path that makes maximal use of the available processor resources, or a path containing a generic sequence of instructions (which are potentially much slower). The Intel settlement with AMD seems to cover the issue, but perhaps the Intel lawyers have another view. Intel could probably remove the GenuineIntel check without overly effecting their sales"
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Economic and cultural commentary on C

derek_farn derek_farn writes  |  more than 5 years ago

derek_farn writes "A major update to a book covering the economic and cultural aspects of the C language announced on /. four years ago has just been released. The pdf (10.5M) is still available as a free download (here and here). C continues to be popular, with new compilers being written, e.g., llvm, fancy new pattern match search and replace tools and a continuous stream of research papers (the book cites over 100 new ones since its first release). Peaks in the pdf downloads, averaging around 1,200 per month, are driven by sudden popularity in various parts of the world. In January of this year a Chinese blog entry resulted in 3,000 downloads in one week. A Google translation suggested that the author had the "heart of Budda"."
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Cost effective flying car

derek_farn derek_farn writes  |  more than 5 years ago

derek_farn writes "At last somebody has come up with a workable flying car that does not cost the earth (a snip at £35,000-£40,000), require special licensing (ok, a powered parachute licence), can travel a reasonable distance and can carry luggage. It even runs on bioethanol."
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Latest edition of "The New C Standard" boo

derek_farn derek_farn writes  |  more than 6 years ago

derek_farn writes "The latest edition of my book "The New C Standard: An Economic and Cultural Commentary" is available for free download (10M pdf, here, here and here). It has been 2.5 years since the last update and the new version integrates all of the changes made to the C Standard in response to published defect reports, plus material derived from 60+ related papers and books published in the last 2.5 years, and of course fixes all of the reported faults. There is also a Google searchable version of the C Standard, a Firefox search plugin, that includes the corresponding excerpts from the book."
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Latest edition of "The New C Standard" boo

derek_farn derek_farn writes  |  more than 6 years ago

derek_farn writes "The latest edition of my book "The New C Standard: An Economic and Cultural Commentary" is available for free download (10M pdf, here, here and here). It has been 2.5 years since the last update and the new version integrates all of the changes made to the C Standard in response to published defect reports, plus material derived from 60+ related papers and books published in the last 2.5 years, and of course fixes all of the reported faults. There is also a Google searchable version of the C Standard, Firefox search plugin, that includes the corresponding excerpts from the book."
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derek_farn derek_farn writes  |  more than 7 years ago

derek_farn writes "The UK postcode database — which turns a postcode to a latitude/longitude or street+range of numbers — is not free. In fact, it's very expensive. The Post Office, which used to be government owned, claims copyright on it and charges a license fee for its use. So we paid to create it and now have to pay for a copy of it. A group of people have gotten together to create an Open Source postcode database. People are asked to enter data they have generated themselves and is free of copyright. The data can be entering a postcode plus latittude/longitude or postcode and a click on a map (unfortunately from the 1950s).

On a related note the growing availability of GPS devices means that the Open Street Map project is making great progress. You guessed it, UK citizens don't have free access to the maps we paid to create."
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derek_farn derek_farn writes  |  more than 7 years ago

derek_farn writes "Google now have a page that supports source code searching. I hope they extend it to be more programming language aware (eg, search for identifiers and functions) like the specialist code search sites (Krugle, Codease), who probably now how very worried investors. I don't see any option to search for Cobol. I guess there is not a lot of Cobol source available on the Internet, even although there is supposed to be more Cobol source in existence than any other language (perhaps that statement is not true in the noughties)."

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