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Comments

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Qt Upgrades From LGPLv2.1 to LGPLv3

diamondmagic Re:GPL is about User/Owner Freedoms (113 comments)

I can't speak for "freedom" because it's not well defined, but in the typical use meaning "liberty", GPLv3 is definitely less liberal than GPLv2.

Liberty is defined in terms of what one can legally (or violence, etc) compel someone else to do. It doesn't distinguish between audiences. If license A and B are identical except that licence A has some additional condition where I can file a lawsuit to get you to stop doing something, license A is necessarily less liberal, i.e. less free.

The FSF's notion of "free" is kind of backwards like this.

13 hours ago
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Two Years of Data On What Military Equipment the Pentagon Gave To Local Police

diamondmagic Re:No (264 comments)

Military surplus makes such tyranny especially cheap, cheaper than it would otherwise be. Also something about the law of demand.

4 days ago
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Swedish Dad Takes Gamer Kids To Warzone

diamondmagic Re:Gettin All Up In Yo Biznis (417 comments)

billions of people the world over not only believe in them, but murder the holy living shit out of each other because of said belief.

I seriously doubt there's "billions" of murders on the planet, let alone potential murders, regardless of the reason. Many participants in wars have been religious, and will preach their beliefs in the course of doing so, but of course this is statistically to be expected, do not confuse correlation with causation. In contrast, communism is directly responsible for somewhere in the vicinity of 100 million deaths (by execution as an enemy of the state, starvation due to artificial shortage, etc; WW2 by contrast is likely 2/3rds this number, including disease, fatigue, and diversion of resources and labor away from home).

5 days ago
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DARPA Wants To Kill the Password

diamondmagic Re:Passwords don't need to be killed (383 comments)

Minor problem: What if the master key is compromised? What if you want to change the identity you want to present to a website - just one website? You're screwed, and out of luck (respectively).

The proposal also assumes that the authority component of the URI (the hostname, usually) is the party you want to identify to - it doesn't.

It's not good enough for Web standards to work for 95% or 99% of people - they have to work for everyone, hence all of the back-and-forth of the standards development process.

I would point out WebID doesn't have these shortcomings.

about two weeks ago
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NFL Fights To Save TV Blackout Rule Despite $9 Billion Revenue

diamondmagic Re:Punishes fans? (216 comments)

s/profit/revenue/

Two totally different things.

about two weeks ago
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Algorithm Predicts US Supreme Court Decisions 70% of Time

diamondmagic Re:Simplified algorithm (177 comments)

You don't own a newspaper to deliver your opinion to the front steps of millions of people... Oh well?

That doesn't mean we can go around neutering newspapers. Now, I never said "money = speech", but that doesn't make the First Amendment implications any less relevant. You cannot enforce a law that has the effect of chilling speech. Period full stop.

Everything for Obamacare/PPACA, including the "penalty" tax and tax on medical devices, was introduced in the Senate. They could only pass the Senate version because it was the only version passed on either side of the Rotunda before Democrats lost their "super majority" in the Senate -- the House had to pass it second.

Again, you can't uphold a law that's unconstitutional. This means due process, and equal protection of the law. People have rights, and every time someone is allowed to exercise those rights in a way you don't like, you want to blame the Court. No thank you.

We also sent millions of Japanese Americans to detention centers, and continue to lock up people in Federal prison for completely consensual, non-violent "crimes", in the name of "the public good". When you have a completely subjective, flexible, term as "public good" you get the TSA, Homeland Security, USA PATRIOT Act, DEA, NSA, and you can protest it as much as you want but no court is going to agree with you on how their idea of public good is wrong, and your idea of public good is right. No thank you. We have rights that are above even every last person on Earth going to a poll station and checking the right box.

about two weeks ago
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Algorithm Predicts US Supreme Court Decisions 70% of Time

diamondmagic Re:Simplified algorithm (177 comments)

The Court's first responsibility is to uphold the law -- not the law as they or anyone else wants it. This includes the Constitution, the "supreme law of the land" - they can't uphold a law that Congress has no authority to pass in the first place.

From this viewpoint, let's take a look at those decisions:

Bad decision: Calling the ACA a "tax". The ACA originated in the Senate, even though the Constitution requires that new taxes originate in the House. Furthermore, you can't compel people to buy something, and you can't compel a company to sell something - that's outright slavery, if it was ever recently legalized.

Good decision: Upholding the free speech of individuals, whether representing a corporation or themselves. The First Amendment says "Congress shall make no law... abridging the freedom of speech." No exemptions are listed. (And the Constitution, mind you, has numerous exemptions to various things - not in this amendment, though.) You might say "But money isn't speech!" which is technically, literally true, but doesn't make the First Amendment implications any less relevant. It costs money to publish speech, and this applies to newspapers, websites, and bloggers; in addition to advertisers. Additionally, the Federal government doesn't have the power to legislate intrastate exchange; it only has some power over interstate trade, the power to regulate (which does not include prohibition).

It sounds like all you want to do is force some people to behave the way you want them to behave, without considering that they might have a right to do so even when you disagree with them on the matter.

about two weeks ago
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Verizon Throttles Data To "Provide Incentive To Limit Usage"

diamondmagic Re:And the FCC will do... (316 comments)

Um, remember the Broadcast Flag? The FCC claiming “ancillary” authority under the 1996 Tellecommunications Act to Regulate the Internet?

The FCC only exists to allocate RF spectrum and limit interference in it -- THE FCC IS NOT YOUR FRIEND (nor do you want them to be). They do not exist to make Internet providers do your bidding - if they're violating a contract (i.e. "unlimited" Internet), that's the proper role of the courts to enforce.

about two weeks ago
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How Google Handles 'Right To Be Forgotten' Requests

diamondmagic Re:Try to make me forget. (135 comments)

It's not so much "right to be forgotten" as it is "obligation for you to shut up," is it?

about three weeks ago
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The Misleading Fliers Comcast Used To Kill Off a Local Internet Competitor

diamondmagic Re:Missing the headline (250 comments)

And here I was thinking that the NSA was a bad thing.

about three weeks ago
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The Misleading Fliers Comcast Used To Kill Off a Local Internet Competitor

diamondmagic Missing the headline (250 comments)

Why would you have to have city council approval to start a new ISP? How dare they kill competition, stifle innovat... Oh, it was going to be a taxpayer funded, government run ISP?

My local DMV can't even keep their computers running for more than a few hours at a time. Seriously, good riddance!

about three weeks ago
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Firefox 33 Integrates Cisco's OpenH264

diamondmagic Re:bad for standards (194 comments)

Code implementing software patents can still be Free/Open Source Software. I mean, isn't that what x264 and VLC is? The un-FOSS-like restriction is one enforced by the government and patent trolls, not the software project.

Just because one country makes it illegal means you should, or even have to, spread it all around the world.

Mozilla isn't even offering people the option to enable h.264 in some alternative fashion (maybe a user could provide it themselves, maybe Firefox searches the OS or hardware for an h.264 implementation) - which they could legally do - no, they're just saying "Haha, screw you".

about a month ago
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Amazon Isn't Killing Writing, the Market Is

diamondmagic Re:false choice (192 comments)

Who the hell are you to tell other people which movies, or any products for that matter, they must and must not like?

about a month ago
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Oculus Suspends Oculus Rift Dev Kit Sales In China

diamondmagic Re:What's wrong with reselling? (131 comments)

If the manufacturer loses revenue for mispricing their product, that's their problem, not the developer's, or anyone else's.

The warm fuzzy feeling of sending your money to the manufacturer instead of someone who helped you get the product in your hands in the first place is worth exactly $0.00.

about a month and a half ago
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Oculus Suspends Oculus Rift Dev Kit Sales In China

diamondmagic Re:What's wrong with reselling? (131 comments)

The price wouldn't be as high if it weren't for them in the first place.

That's a good thing though. A higher price encourages people who have one to sell it, ensuring that they don't just sit around idle.

If a low price were an end unto itself, why not just hand them out for free?

about a month and a half ago
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Oculus Suspends Oculus Rift Dev Kit Sales In China

diamondmagic Re:What's wrong with reselling? (131 comments)

The market for dev kits can't expand in time to meet consumer demand, nor would it be cost-effective to try to do so. It takes a lot of capital to ramp up to full consumer production capacities. And, any dev kit taken out of the hands of actual developers will tend to limit eventual dev support at launch time. It's crucial to get those devices into the hands of actual developers in order to ensure there is actual support for the product at launch time. There's no need to expand access to this particular product, because it's not a consumer product.

All these are reasons to continue selling the product, at a higher price, and to resellers (if they'll still buy).

Higher market prices expand access to a product... period. That's called the law of supply.

The amount of capital consumer production would take is irrelevant. They're selling one product, it's designed for developers, and at the manufacturer price, there's a shortage.

If the kit is being resold, it's still getting into the hands of someone who wants one, and it ensures that they have guaranteed access to one, which is something Occulus isn't doing! (And if discriminating between developers vs. others is a stated goal, they've already completely failed at it. However, who else but a developer would pay the higher price for hardware that's supported by no games?)

So do you want to ensure that developers can get their hands on this, but you don't want to expand access? That's mutually contradictory.

about a month and a half ago
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Oculus Suspends Oculus Rift Dev Kit Sales In China

diamondmagic Re:What's wrong with reselling? (131 comments)

If Oculus wanted to collect that revenue, they'd have raised the prices on day one. Most markets work perfectly fine without auctions...

That's not to say that reselling adds "no value." It ensures that someone willing to pay the higher price gets one, whereas they might not get one at all otherwise. That certainly adds value! Profit, by definition, means taking scarce, valuable, resources; and selling it as something more valuable.

about a month and a half ago
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Oculus Suspends Oculus Rift Dev Kit Sales In China

diamondmagic Re:What's wrong with reselling? (131 comments)

Except now nobody in China is buying one. How is that better? That sounds worse!

If there's a limited quantity, there's a limited quantity, it doesn't matter who buys or resells, the same number of people are getting one. The higher price simply ensures those who want it the most get one: you don't "wait" for a scalped unit, the whole purpose of reselling so that people who want one now can get one now guaranteed, without risking losing out or waiting.

about a month and a half ago
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Oculus Suspends Oculus Rift Dev Kit Sales In China

diamondmagic Re:What's wrong with reselling? (131 comments)

Yes they're developer kits, and nearly everything in the world is limited in supply, how does this change the situation? Secondary markets like this expand access to the product to those who want it, not limit it. It encourages people who have one to sell it, and it makes it possible for those who need one now to get it now.

about a month and a half ago
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Oculus Suspends Oculus Rift Dev Kit Sales In China

diamondmagic What's wrong with reselling? (131 comments)

There's nothing wrong with "scalping, plain and simple." It's just a secondary market for goods - the very kind we like when we talk about books or music. You have a right to resell things.

If there's a very active secondary market for something, that suggests people are having a hard time getting it from the primary source, or there's just not enough to go around to everyone who wants one, so a higher market price forms. It encourages people who have one to sell it for the new, higher price (increasing supply); and it ensures that those who most urgently want one can get one if they so choose.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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NSA Caused Syria's 2012 Internet Outage

diamondmagic diamondmagic writes  |  about a week ago

diamondmagic (877411) writes "Wired's new profile of Edward Snowden reveals that the 2012 outage of Syria's Internet, in an attempt to spy on communications in the midst of a civil war, was caused when the NSA tried to remotely install an exploit onto a core router. The article continues: "But something went wrong, and the router was bricked instead—rendered totally inoperable. The failure of this router caused Syria to suddenly lose all connection to the Internet—although the public didn’t know that the US government was responsible.""

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