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Nintendo Puts Business In Brazil On Hiatus

diamondmagic Re:Brazil has long had a very protectionist (111 comments)

The theorem doesn't require money. You could be trading apples for money, apples for butter for oranges, apples directly for oranges, doesn't matter. If three's comparative advantage, people trade. Period.

If people aren't trading, that doesn't mean the theorem is wrong; it means one of the conditions isn't being satisfied.

about two weeks ago
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Nintendo Puts Business In Brazil On Hiatus

diamondmagic Re:Brazil has long had a very protectionist (111 comments)

What part of beneficial for both of us don't you understand? Both parties will be able to eat more total food. The less productive group will still be eating less, but more than if they didn't trade at all.

There is no situation in which it's bad to permit people to trade. Again, mathematical theorem.

about two weeks ago
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Ted Cruz To Oversee NASA and US Science Programs

diamondmagic Re:Third World Status, Here We Come! (496 comments)

So let me get this straight, in 1776 the Founding Fathers got together to protest the mass poverty and bad British tea, and started NASA so we could lob said tea into space. It eventually made us so rich we became the best developed country on the Earth and now we're exploring how to cultivate tea and coffee on Mars.

Uh huh. If it were that easy to create developed nations, we'd be going into third world countries handing out space programs, not rice (and all the less lovely stuff our foreign aid props up)

about two weeks ago
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Ted Cruz To Oversee NASA and US Science Programs

diamondmagic Re:WTF (496 comments)

Science is a process, the process of coming up with a hypothesis and experimentally testing it in controlled conditions.

Saying we should take less money from people doesn't make you an "enemy of science." If anything, it makes you a champion of the dismal science (you know, economics).

about two weeks ago
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Would You Rent Out Your Unused Drive Space?

diamondmagic Re:No way in HELL! (331 comments)

Um, what do think you're doing when you download a torrent?

What do you think you're doing when you request a webpage?

about three weeks ago
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Nintendo Puts Business In Brazil On Hiatus

diamondmagic Re:Brazil has long had a very protectionist (111 comments)

How in the world does comparative advantage not exist in a place like Brazil? To say there's no comparative advantage is so statistically improbable you may as well get hit by an asteroid. A million times.

You know what comparative advantage is, right? If it takes me $5 to produce an apple and $4 to produce an orange, and it takes you $2 to produce an apple and $1 to produce an orange; that's comparative advantage: Even though you produce both fruits by far and away cheaper than I do, you produce oranges at an opportunity cost 2x cheaper, and so Economics says we will trade, and it will be beneficial for both of us to do so.

about three weeks ago
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Nintendo Puts Business In Brazil On Hiatus

diamondmagic Re:Brazil has long had a very protectionist (111 comments)

You're not supposed to produce everything as cheap as your neighbors, it's actually bad thing to do that. Even if your neighbor produces literally everything below the cost of domestic production, so long as the two entities have different opportunity costs for different goods, it's still more beneficial to outsource stuff and trade. Economists call this comparative advantage and it's a mathematical theorem.

about three weeks ago
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FCC Favors Net Neutrality

diamondmagic BREAKING (255 comments)

FCC loves coming up with (and misimplementing) excuses to exercise authority, news at 11.

about three weeks ago
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Bill Would Ban Paid Prioritization By ISPs

diamondmagic Re:Doesn't go far enough (216 comments)

If someone says they're going to deliver a package and they're not, that's fraud.

If you pay for a certain level of service and your ISP doesn't deliver, that's also fraud.

No public policy, no Net Neutrality necessary.

about three weeks ago
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Bill Would Ban Paid Prioritization By ISPs

diamondmagic What problem would have this solved? (216 comments)

Can anyone name ONE Net Neutrality issue ever that this would have prevented?

The big one everyone seems to point to was the Cogent/Netflix/Verizon issue, which was not "last mile", and so wouldn't have been solved by this bill (assuming the bill can actually do everything it says it can). That issue wasn't even a Net Neutrality issue, it was a peering dispute over a pipe that just happened to be a heavy carrier of Netflix traffic.

This seems entirely populist, why would they wait until now, after Republicans took control of congress, to bring it up? This is just like the Republican's repeated ACA/Obamacare bills, yes, it's dealing with something bad, but the bill isn't going anywhere, and it wouldn't even be a bill if they were in power. It's grandstanding.

Also, the bill seems to grant the FCC powers over commerce. Um, yikes. Who here wants the FCC examining your purchases and checking your router table configuration over it?

about three weeks ago
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Bill Would Ban Paid Prioritization By ISPs

diamondmagic Re:This is what's wrong... (216 comments)

To preface, this is not a partisan-based slam. This is a slam on our entire system. The fact that we accept something won't pass despite it being universally wanted by "the people" (not pronounced "corporations") shows our biggest hurdle that we as a country need to overcome. Not race/gender equality or financial disparity, but the ability of this country to be propelled forward by a system that is representative to the needs of the many, not the powerful.

I don't even know where to start on how dangerous this is. This is populism straight up, tyranny of the majority, screw any minority/individual's rights.

When any group of people can hold a vote and force someone out of their house - or take away their property or life - that's plain wrong.

about three weeks ago
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Bill Would Ban Paid Prioritization By ISPs

diamondmagic Re:Fuck the libs! (216 comments)

No, Net neutrality is a routing policy about how to prioritize packets that people can choose to implement.

Using the government to mandate it upon everyone, under threat of legal action, whether it's a good solution or not, is an entirely different issue.

about three weeks ago
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When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

diamondmagic Re:All of them (119 comments)

This might be the first time I've ever heard anyone suggest that no lines at a government facility are a bad thing.

about a month ago
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South Korean Activist To Drop "The Interview" In North Korea Using Balloons

diamondmagic Re: And who will watch it? (146 comments)

The Internet is a proper noun.

They have a network of some sort; it is effectively not the Internet.

about a month ago
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India Faces Its First Major Net Neutrality Issue

diamondmagic This is a fraud issue (61 comments)

You can't say "We provide Internet access!" and then deny access to a range of TCP/UDP port numbers. You might be able to say "Web connectivity!" (and I have no problem with this), but not Internet.

about a month ago
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Dish Pulls Fox News, Fox Business Network As Talks Break Down

diamondmagic Re:Why is this on /. ? (275 comments)

... because it wouldn't have happened if the FCC would just get their act together and enforce Net Neutrality, dammit! /s

about a month ago
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Small Bank In Kansas Creates the Bank Account of the Future

diamondmagic Re:Unless it has support for Bitcoin... (156 comments)

Much of the problem is this is encoded into law in US banking regulations, including money laundering laws, the USA PATRIOT act, and the Check 21 Act that defined the now-antique process of electronic checks, and happens to make US checking horribly insecure without any legal fix (a very good example of why not to encode technical standards into law).

Banks wouldn't get any particular advantage over repeal of much of this regulation (except maybe the PATRIOT parts, which directly makes banking less accessible to customers), so they're probably not fighting for it. And to the contrary, it raises barriers to entry into the market and encourages vendor-lock in (I can transfer money within a company instantly; between banks takes 2-3 days).

about a month and a half ago
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LG To Show Off New 55-Inch 8K Display at CES

diamondmagic Re:7680 8K (179 comments)

It derives from cinema, where 2k projectors output 2048x1080: 16:9 productions still use a 1920x1080 subframe, but most movies are either in 2.40:1 or 1.80:1 which is wider than 1920x1080, hence the extra width supported by digital cinema projectors.

Somewhere along the line, someone figured 2160p was too strange a number to use for consumer 16:9 televisions, so they went with "4k" by which to mean "16:9 in a 4k frame."

about a month and a half ago
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BitTorrent Launches Project Maelstrom, the First Torrent-Based Browser

diamondmagic Re:Right (67 comments)

You just need to track down a peer who's a member of the network, and you need to be able to get packets to them. Any peer will do; doesn't matter who or how much you trust them.

How is any part of that 'centralized'?

The very worst that can happen is you never get to download your file, or your payment never makes it to the vendor, if you have a bottleneck through your ISP, and your ISP decides to cut your service... but that's not a fault of the protocol, that's a fault of physics. If you have any connection at all to the network, Bitcoin and Bittorrent will work.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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NSA Caused Syria's 2012 Internet Outage

diamondmagic diamondmagic writes  |  about 6 months ago

diamondmagic (877411) writes "Wired's new profile of Edward Snowden reveals that the 2012 outage of Syria's Internet, in an attempt to spy on communications in the midst of a civil war, was caused when the NSA tried to remotely install an exploit onto a core router. The article continues: "But something went wrong, and the router was bricked instead—rendered totally inoperable. The failure of this router caused Syria to suddenly lose all connection to the Internet—although the public didn’t know that the US government was responsible.""

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