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Comments

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FCC To Rule On "Paid Prioritization" Deals By Internet Service Providers

diamondmagic Re:We are fucked (125 comments)

That's called "dedicated". You can ask for it, but it's ridiculously expensive.

As in, two to three orders of magnitude more expensive, depending on the SLA that you want.

3 days ago
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Kano Ships 18,000 Learn-To-Code Computer Kits

diamondmagic Re:Good news for a change. (51 comments)

Failed projects are unusual enough that that's why they make the news. Do you have some data to the contrary you'd like to share?

Contributor to three successful and delivered Kickstarter projects speaking (one late by a year, but for an awesome reason), and backer to another handful, all delivered or on schedule (so they tell me).

3 days ago
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State of Iowa Tells Tesla To Cancel Its Scheduled Test Drives

diamondmagic Re:The "old boys' club" (334 comments)

Commerce is either interstate or intrastate.

Many of their business operations might be interstate - and thus subject to federal law - but a sale in Iowa from Iowa to Iowa is not.

4 days ago
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Flurry of Scans Hint That Bash Vulnerability Could Already Be In the Wild

diamondmagic Re:Can anyone explain? (317 comments)

The vulnerability is that a string that looks like a function definition can be constructed to be immediately executed prior to execution of the bash script. (This is to support truly ancient bash scripts back when functions were defined as VARIABLE()="() { body }".) However, a bug in that code means the entire value gets executed as a bash script, and so it's possible to append code to the function definition, and it'll get executed as bash code.

Essentially, it's lesson #1 why not to use eval() in your programs.

The danger is that user inputs in Web programs are frequently passed as environment variables to programs. This is especially true in CGI, where the request URI and HTTP headers are passed as environment variables.

This means if you use bash in your CGI, you can execute whatever command you like, as "apache" or whoever you're executing your CGI as. Remotely.

about a week ago
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Irish Girls Win Google Science Fair With Astonishing Crop Yield Breakthrough

diamondmagic Re:Cheap food kills (308 comments)

You can't say that because we're assuming ceteris paribus and we've already defined our control as the productivity of food on a given plot of land.

Our food production per plot of land has gone up; or, our required size of land to produce the same amount of food has gone down.

We can't say for sure if one person's profits will go up or down, at least not without additional information about the particularities and price elasticity stats of the market, because both their costs and their revenue have changed. But markets change all the time, people (and farmers especially) know they have to change produce from time to time, depending on what's profitable. Overall, though, lower costs are a good thing. Always. That's exactly what's happening here.

Societies where most people are in agriculture tend to be societies where most people are poor, and this is a causal effect: Their costs are so high for farming they can't afford to have industry elsewhere. Reducing costs means fewer people have to be in agriculture, and this is good.

This isn't even a feedback loop, although sometimes people will make a similar argument around other phenomenon assuming all feedback loops must be a positive feedback loop that never decays, incorrectly reaching the conclusion the economy will eventually collapse. (E.g. "Prices went up, therefore the cost of producing/refining oil/gas will go up, therefore the cost of producing many products will go up, until all products cost infinity!")

about a week ago
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Irish Girls Win Google Science Fair With Astonishing Crop Yield Breakthrough

diamondmagic Re:The Global Food Crisis is not a science problem (308 comments)

If you have literally nothing to spend, then your elasticity of demand is undefined. It's a division by zero error.

However in general, the law of diminishing marginal utility necessarily implies that as your income shrinks, your elasticity of demand becomes perfectly elastic (i.e. -infinity).

about a week ago
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Irish Girls Win Google Science Fair With Astonishing Crop Yield Breakthrough

diamondmagic Re:The Global Food Crisis is not a science problem (308 comments)

Let's backtrack to Econ 101: This is a change in supply, i.e. a movement of the supply curve on a plot of supply and demand, specifically, a movement to the right.

This causes the market price of the good (food, here) to fall.

It's possible to do quite a lot of things that we don't do, the question the economist faces is at what cost?

The demand curve for food by most people in the middle class and above is somewhat inelastic. I think it's fair to say the extra food production, to the extent there is any, is going to make for fewer hungry people, whose lower income makes their spending on food more elastic.

about a week ago
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Stanford Promises Not To Use Google Money For Privacy Research

diamondmagic Stanford says it's an "internal policy" (54 comments)

Stanford says it's an "internal policy": https://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/...

All donors to the Center--and to Stanford more generally--agree to give their funds as unrestricted gifts, for which there is no contractual agreement and no promised products, results, or deliverables.

But this makes absolutely no sense. If all money goes into a general fund, there's no distinguishing "whose" money it is, it's Stanford's money.

about a week ago
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Native Netflix Support Is Coming To Linux

diamondmagic Re:DRM should not be in HTML5 (178 comments)

HTML doesn't mention DRM. See for yourself: http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/PR-h...

There's Encrypted Media Extensions, which everyone says is "ZOMG DRM", but it's an entirely separate document, and no more insidious than EncryptedXML.

You can't "standardize" DRM, it's literally impossible.

about two weeks ago
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U2 and Apple Collaborate On 'Non-Piratable, Interactive Format For Music'

diamondmagic Re:Expert. (358 comments)

As a respected M.D. at least Dre has some validity as a good ear, and he can evaluate the results of different parametric curves on tone signature

Fixed

about two weeks ago
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ISIS Bans Math and Social Studies For Children

diamondmagic Re:I LOVE READING PROPAGANDA (981 comments)

The metric you're looking for, and the only meaningful one for your point, is called Real GDP Per Capita. And it's up. Subcatagories of durable goods are also up. Up in real terms, per capita.

If you want to say we would be manufacturing more if not due to bad economic policy, fine. I agree.

But don't spread this nonsense that is technically the same thing as saying we're in a recession.

about two weeks ago
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ISIS Bans Math and Social Studies For Children

diamondmagic Re:I LOVE READING PROPAGANDA (981 comments)

GDP measures the growth of the economy as a whole, over time, within a particular geographical area.

If you say that share of GDP of a certain industry to nationwide GDP has changed from 28% to 12%, but overall GDP grew 600% (or whatever), then mathematically, said industry grew -- it wasn't #1 in growth, but it still grew.

Nor does manufacturing need to be #1. The service sector can grow without sucking up other industry's resources, so naturally the GDP-share of other industry is going to shrink.

These are well-defined terms in economics. You're just being obtuse.

about two weeks ago
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The FCC Net Neutrality Comment Deadline Has Arrived: What Now?

diamondmagic Re:Spoilers (131 comments)

That sounds like "throttling" and in the particular way they're doing it, "fraud." I still fail to see how Net Neutrality comes in here.

about two weeks ago
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The FCC Net Neutrality Comment Deadline Has Arrived: What Now?

diamondmagic Re:Spoilers (131 comments)

The issue is ISPs throttling based upon provider source.

Now there's an actual Net Neutrality violation. But...

If you pay for a 100Mbps connection I imagine you expect it should be pretty close to 100Mbps to any endpoint on the internet barring their end having a slower connection, not you can only get 2.5Mbps to Netflix because ISP don't like them but you can have your full 100Mbps to app store owned by ISP.

You don't need legislation for that, isn't that called fraud?

about two weeks ago
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The FCC Net Neutrality Comment Deadline Has Arrived: What Now?

diamondmagic Re:Spoilers (131 comments)

That makes even less sense... How's that a problem unique to Internet providers, never mind routing rules on routers?

about two weeks ago
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The FCC Net Neutrality Comment Deadline Has Arrived: What Now?

diamondmagic Re:Spoilers (131 comments)

I doubt Net Neutrality is about "fast lanes". Isn't that called... you know, bandwidth? When I pay my Internet carrier per Mbps for a dedicated pipe, how is that not paying for a "fast(er) lane"?

about two weeks ago
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The FCC Net Neutrality Comment Deadline Has Arrived: What Now?

diamondmagic Re:Spoilers (131 comments)

Net Neutrality is a technically a routing policy that individual nodes in the network can comply with. My home router is most certainly not neutral, for instance, and that's a good thing, I like how I have traffic prioritized on my network.

Of course, that definition doesn't really make sense in this context. Perhaps you refer to enforcing a law that brings legal action against router operators that don't implement the routing policy. But that doesn't really make any sense either; the FCC never had any policy on the books to begin with. You can't end something by continuing to not have a law three decades after the fact.

(Fwiw, I'm totally down for not enacting more laws. The FCC is not your friend, and I doubt they'd be an effective packet police.)

about two weeks ago
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Direct Sales OK Baked Into Nevada's $1.3 Billion Incentive Deal With Tesla

diamondmagic Re:Why is this legal in the U.S.? (149 comments)

Corporations have been around long before the 19th century and as legal entities managed and owned by us individuals, they most certainly do enjoy the same rights to own property and conduct trade, and are held accountable to not violate the law.

That last part is kind of important. Corporations are considered persons because they're expected to follow the law, too!

Really, what do you think corporations are made of, woodland critters and robots?

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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NSA Caused Syria's 2012 Internet Outage

diamondmagic diamondmagic writes  |  about a month and a half ago

diamondmagic (877411) writes "Wired's new profile of Edward Snowden reveals that the 2012 outage of Syria's Internet, in an attempt to spy on communications in the midst of a civil war, was caused when the NSA tried to remotely install an exploit onto a core router. The article continues: "But something went wrong, and the router was bricked instead—rendered totally inoperable. The failure of this router caused Syria to suddenly lose all connection to the Internet—although the public didn’t know that the US government was responsible.""

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