Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Tech Allows Stable Integration of Wind In the Power Grid

diegocgteleline.es Re:There are two sides in that coin... (235 comments)

Most of the subsidies have been cut (which is why the install rate of solar power stations has plummetted), and the money paid is not all a subsidy (to start with, the government doesn't pays it and the taxpayers money is not touched). In spain solar and wind power is 0 in the "power market", and the power distribution companies have to pay solar and wind energy at a prices the government has set. If there was a free market there wouldn't be any price set by the government, but the owners of solar and wind power stations would ask for a higher price than 0. There would be certainly a difference between the current price and the theorical free-market price, but some people think that the current price is all of it a subsidy, which it isn't (we just don't know how much of it is a subsidy). But that doesn't really matters, renewables are stil progressing. The proof is that despide of the lack of strong subsidies some companies are still planning new installations. Elecnor announced recently 3 new solar stations of 50 MW each one that will cost 900 millions - from their pocket. They wouldn't risk that money if they feared that the pro-nuclear opposition party can ruin it with a policy change.

Oh, and the nuclear power stations that have been dismantled in the last 20 years weren't really dismantled because of a anti-nuclear policy. The real problem was that those nuclear stations weren't needed (3 of our 8 nuclear power stations are switched off right now, and we are still exporting power to other countries) and some power companys went bankrupt while constructing them. The government had to use taxpayers money (lots of them) to keep those private companies alive, and had to stop the construction of new stations to avoid more losses. The best way the government found to hide all that was to tell the media that they had decided to go green.

more than 4 years ago
top

How Google Uses Linux

diegocgteleline.es Re:Togh (155 comments)

You are right... ...except that the distro makers and the kernel hackers think the contrary.

more than 4 years ago
top

Microsoft Opening Outlook's PST Format

diegocgteleline.es Re:Oh no... (319 comments)

Let me add another reason:

(5) They don't care about the outlook format because Sharepoint is the new closed format. They don't care if your outlook mailboxes (or .doc or anything else) is in an open format because you put it all in sharepoint. You still can read your mailbox with another program, but because the "metadata" of your IT infrastructure (which isn't a single file, but a lot of files with owners and relationships between all them) is stored in sharepoint you're tied to it for the eternity. This is a brilliant move - Microsoft can convice governments that their outlook and office and all their apps are using open formats, but no government will ask about the openness of sharepoint because it's not an application that reads some kind of document.

more than 4 years ago
top

Sneak Preview of New OpenOffice 3.2

diegocgteleline.es Re:Faster... (377 comments)

That myth being moderated as "insightful" yet again....sight.

To start with, "startup speed" and "UI reponsiveness" are two different things. Firefox startup is fast (probably not the fastest, but fast), how would you compare it with Openoffice, which is quite slow? Firefox startup is not a issue for adoption, unlike it happens in openoffice, where it is a real problem. Firefox had startup problems back when firefox didn't existed, and it was firefox who solved them - without dropping xul (or any of the other mozilla technologies, for that matter). Firefox startup "problems" have nothing to do with XUL, if you check this blog you will find that XUL is not related to the startup gains mentioned there.

And when did you hear users saying that Firefox UI is not reponsive? It's just as reponsive as any other desktop app. When the chrome jit gets enabled by default it will be the same as running native code. So no, sorry, XUL is not a problem and there's nothing that "must be done" with it. In fact, it's a nice and very useful advantage for the mozilla project.

more than 3 years ago
top

PulseAudio Creator Responds To Critics

diegocgteleline.es Re:This is the Sound of (815 comments)

Pulseaudio is a system that would be, at best, a minor improvement in a perfect world and a never ending nightmare in the real one.

The current linux audio system was far from perfect. ALSA also was a minor improvement back when OSS + esd were the perfect world.

2. Pulse blameshifts all it's problems to apps and drivers. Ok, apps (open source ones anyway) will eventually get fixed. Drivers won't. Motherboards do not ship with sound drivers for Linux. Linux ships generic drivers for the sound chips on popular systems. There is a big difference.

The alsa drivers have lots of quirks to make sure it works for a given model of a given brand, just take a look at the sound/pci/hda git log output. There's nothing windows does here that linux can't do...

more than 4 years ago
top

PulseAudio Creator Responds To Critics

diegocgteleline.es Re:This is the Sound of (815 comments)

The problems are generally with the sorts of things that PulseAudio wants to do which shows up problems in ALSA.

Well, ALSA can be fixed. Pulseaudio works closely with the alsa devs to make them aware of their problems. They seem to have fixed the problems here.

Why people just can't accept that Pulseaudio can work and does work for most people? I mean, distros wouldn't have been able to push it if didn't worked for most of people. Pulseaudio, Alsa, etc, seems to work exactly as expected. Can't you guys get over it and admit that it's not because we are not "lucky" but because the whole thing does work?

more than 4 years ago
top

PulseAudio Creator Responds To Critics

diegocgteleline.es Re:This is the Sound of (815 comments)

I'm pleased for you. You've been lucky.

No, I have not been "lucky". I had problems with Pulseaudio in the past. I had to unistall pulseaudio. But the problems are fixed now. Just like your problems will be fixed, if they haven't already been fixed upstream. Hey it looks like you guys are overreacting here.

If they were then we wouldn't get articles like this and Lennart wouldn't be as defensive as he is.

Considering the high number of geeks attacking Pulseaudio with stupid reasons, I understand him.

PulseAudio reimplementing ALSA to look like ALSA is just plain silly.

Indeed. Long term maybe we can merge the libalsa functionality in pulseaudio and get rid of it. It would be far more clean. But that doesn't makes pulseaudio unnecesary.

We've had arts and esound largely to cover up for ALSA

Wrong, arts and esound were born largely to fix OSS....

more than 4 years ago
top

PulseAudio Creator Responds To Critics

diegocgteleline.es Re:This is the Sound of (815 comments)

I should...why? Pulseaudio works great here - no problems at all, no high CPU usage, nothing. It's funny that people will happily waste hours of their time getting rid of alsa while they critize pulseaudio for wasting their time with its problems...

It's clear to anyone that has looked into this that most people are very happy with Pulseaudio. All the important distros ship it, and the users that have problems are clearly a _minority_, which is only getting smaller and smaller with each new version of Pulseaudio, Alsa and the kernel. And the geeks that fear changes and love to bitch about are running out of excuses. Linux would have far more problems going back to OSS4 (hey, why I can't set per-app volume, why audio over bluetooth doesn't works as I want?).

Each time Linux redesigns some subsystem there are problems, and we see the same people bitching about how we should use $ALTERNATIVE instead and how Linux is not ready for the desktop. But with the time the problems dissapear and the linux desktop gets more and more solid.

more than 4 years ago
top

OpenSolaris vs. Linux, For Linux Users

diegocgteleline.es Re:Its a Server OS... (303 comments)

Opensolaris is just as desktop-ready as Linux. Open source desktops are the same in Linux, Opensolaris and BSD: Gnome, KDE, Openoffice, Firefox, X.org, dbus, etc. They all use the same code. From the user POV they are the same.

The one real difference is the hardware support (where Linux is the king). But once you have hardware support in Opensolaris and BSD, the rest of the software stack is identical (and the same applies for servers, BTW).If Linux is desktop ready, opensolaris is also desktop ready.

more than 4 years ago
top

Linux Kernel 2.6.31 Released

diegocgteleline.es Re:Linux audio (374 comments)

You don't need them with OSS on FreeBSD and Solaris (for example), or on Linux with the out-of-tree OSS 4 implementation

You don't need them in ALSA either, because dmix is implemented in the ALSA library, not as a userspace daemon.

It's amazing the increible amount of FUD that has been spread about these topics...

more than 4 years ago
top

Linux Kernel 2.6.31 Released

diegocgteleline.es Re:Linux audio (374 comments)

Where do you think is the fastest place to process, kernel or userspace?

The CPU doesn't run magically faster when it is running kernel code...

more than 4 years ago
top

Linux Kernel 2.6.31 Released

diegocgteleline.es Re:Linux audio (374 comments)

not every app out there is written to use the dmix plugin.

The dmix plugin is used transparently in the ALSA libs, apps don't need to be rewritten to use it...

more than 4 years ago
top

Linux Kernel 2.6.31 Released

diegocgteleline.es Re:Linux audio (374 comments)

With a standard configuration, alsa does also

All the relevant desktop distros enable dmix by default...

more than 4 years ago
top

Linux Kernel 2.6.31 Released

diegocgteleline.es Re:Linux audio (374 comments)

Please see the OSS implementation in FreeBSD for a lesson in how sound should be done.

Yeah, FreeBSD. And instead, why not take a look at how OS X and Windows (Vista and ahead) implement their sound systems? Hint: Both mix audio in userspace, and Pulseaudio is the closest thing to them in Linux land.

But hey, what do OS X and Windows know about desktops and professional sound systems? Nothing. That's why we all should follow the lead and use cutting-edge technology like OSS and in-kernel sound mixing.

.

more than 4 years ago
top

Linux Kernel 2.6.31 Released

diegocgteleline.es Re:Linux audio (374 comments)

Yes, because userspace sound daemons were invented by ALSA. We didn't have these with OSS, not at all....

more than 4 years ago
top

Slow Oracle Merger Leads To Outflow of Sun Projects, Coders

diegocgteleline.es Re:Really? Got any evidence? (409 comments)

So? The EC fined Telefónica (a spanish telco) with 150 millions. And the fined EON (german) and GDF (french) with 550 millions each one for being a cartel. And the fined 11 european and japanese companies with 750 millions (including 330 millions for siemens, which is german).

And in my opinion, the EC is just doing what EEUU should do but doesn't.

more than 4 years ago
top

KDE 4.3 Released

diegocgteleline.es Re:KDevelop4? (432 comments)

Beta 4 was released on 28 June, so you'll need to wait a bit.

about 5 years ago
top

A Short History of Btrfs

diegocgteleline.es Re:Oh great (241 comments)

No it doesn't - it avoids most of the rare cases where you need it, though

about 5 years ago
top

Alan Cox Quits As Linux TTY Maintainer — "I've Had Enough"

diegocgteleline.es Re:Linus (909 comments)

I read the LKML for years.

So do I, and I won't ask you to search proofs of what you say because it's just lies. Try to find just one single phrase where Linus tells Ingo to wrote a new scheduler. You won't find it because it was Ingo who decided to write it, as he explained in the initial announcement.

about 5 years ago
top

Alan Cox Quits As Linux TTY Maintainer — "I've Had Enough"

diegocgteleline.es Re:Linus (909 comments)

You just need to change in your article the name "linus" by "ingo" and then your post may have some sense. Which shows how much you "know" about the topic.

Linus didn't even bothered with the scheduler, Ingo was the maintainer and it was him who was in charge of deciding what should replace it. It was him who argued, not linus. It was him who ended up admitting that the ideas from Con were good and he wrote the scheduler which is now into the kernel. One that, according to Con, was better than his own scheduler.

about 5 years ago

Submissions

top

Stable integration of renewables in the power grid

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 4 years ago

diegocgteleline.es (653730) writes "One of the most frequently raised arguments against renewable power sources is that they can only supply a low percentage of the total power because the unpredictability can unstabilize the grid. Spain seem to have proved the contrary: In the last 3 days, the wind power generation records with respect the total demand were beat two times, (in special conditions: a very windy weekend, during nigth): 45% day 5 and 53% (spanish) last night. There was no unstability. How it was done? There's a Control Center that processes meteorologic data from the whole country and predicts, with high certainty, the wind and solar power that will be generated, allowing a stable integration of all the renewable power. You can see a graphic of the record here."
top

Linux kernel 2.6.31 released

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 4 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "The Linux kernel v2.6.31 has been released. Besides the desktop improvements and USB 3.0 support mentioned some days ago, there is an equivalent of FUSE for character devices that can be used for proxying OSS sound through ALSA, new tools for using hardware performance counters, readahead improvements, ATI Radeon KMS, Intel's Wireless Multicomm 3200 support, gcov support, a memory checker and a memory leak detector, a reimplementation of inotify and dnotify on top of a new filesystem notification infrastructure, btrfs improvements, support for IEEE 802.15.4, IPv4 over Firewire, new drivers and small improvements. The full list of changes can be found here."
top

A short history of Btrfs

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  about 5 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "Valerie Aurora, a linux filesystem developer and ex-ZFS designer, gives in this article a great insight on how Btrfs, the filesystem that will replace Ext4, was created and how it works: "You probably have heard of the cool new kid on the file system block, btrfs. But you might not know much about it beyond a few high-level keywords — copy-on-write, checksums, writable snapshots — and a few sensational rumors and stories — the Phoronix benchmarks, btrfs is a ZFS ripoff, btrfs is a secret plan for Oracle domination of Linux, etc [...] In this article, we'll take a behind-the-scenes look at the design and development of btrfs on many levels — technical, political, personal — and trace it from its origins at a workshop to its current position as Linus's root file system"
top

Valencia (Spain) moves to free software

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 5 years ago

diegocgteleline.es (653730) writes "A LWN article talks about the adoption of free software in the Valencia Autonomous Community (Spain): "Over the last decade or so there have been multiple reports of governments making the switch to free software. Some have been relatively successful, like Munich, others have been less so. A recent report from Valencia provides a nice look inside the transition to free software that has been going on since 2003. The department manager noted that the biggest problem faced was the "fear of change [...] we have faced up to the challenge with well-laid plans, training and an alternative plan of action just in case""
top

Linux kernel 2.6.29 released

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 5 years ago

diegocgteleline.es (653730) writes "Linux kernel 2.6.30 has been released. The list of new features include NILFS2, a new log-structured filesystem, a filesystem for object-based storage devices called exofs, local caching for NFS, the RDS protocol which delivers high-performance reliable connections between the servers of a cluster, a new distributed networking filesystem (POHMELFS), automatic flushing of files on renames/truncates in ext3, ext4 and btrfs, preliminary support for the 802.11w drafts, support for the Microblaze architecture, the Tomoyo security MAC, DRM support for the Radeon R6xx/R7xx graphic cards, asynchronous scanning of devices and partitions for faster bootup, the preadv/pwritev syscalls, several new drivers and many other small improvements."
top

Puerto Rico Google web site defaced

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 5 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "The Puerto Rico Google web site -the official one, as you can check here- has been defaced (warn: spanish site, translation here). You can still see the defaced site on the cache or in screenshots. To make it worse, right now the site is down, which is not very usual in Google. Is this a local issue, or was this a major security screwup? Is google getting worse w.r.t security?"
top

Linux kernel 2.6.29 released

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 5 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "Linus Torvalds has released Linux 2.6.29. The new features include the inclusión of kernel graphic modesetting, WiMAX and AP wifi support, inclusion of squashfs and a preliminary version of btrfs, a more scalable version of RCU, ecryptfs filename encryption, ext4 no journal mode and ocfs2 metadata checksums, improvements to the memory controller, support for filesystem freeze and other features. The full list of changes can be found here"
top

The 2008 Linux and free software timeline

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 5 years ago

diegocgteleline.es (653730) writes "Here is LWN's eleventh annual timeline of significant events in the Linux and free software world for the year. As always, 2008 proved to be an interesting year, with great progress in useful software that made our systems better. Of course, there were some of the usual conflicts--patent woes, project politics, and arguments over freedom--but overall, the pace of free software progress stayed on its upwardly increasing trend. 2008 was a year that saw the end of SCO--or not--the rise of Linux-based "netbooks", multiple excellent distribution releases, more phones and embedded devices based on Linux, as well as major releases of software we will be using for years (X.org, Python, KDE, ...)."
top

Linux 2.6.27 Out

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 5 years ago

diegocgteleline.es (653730) writes "Linux 2.6.27 has been released. It adds a new filesystem (UBIFS) for "pure" flash-based storage, the page-cache is now lockless, much improved Direct I/O scalability and performance, delayed allocation support for ext4, multiqueue networking, data integrity support in the block layer, a function tracer, a mmio tracer, sysprof support, improved webcam support, support for the Intel wifi 5000 series and RTL8187B network cards, a new ath9k driver for the Atheros AR5008 and AR9001 chipsets, more new drivers, and many other improvements and fixes. Full list of changes can be found here."
top

Linux 2.6.26

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 6 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "After three months, Linux 2.6.26 has been released. It adds support for read-only bind mounts, x86 PAT (Page Attribute Tables), PCI Express ASPM (Active State Power Management), ports of KVM to IA64, S390 and PPC, other KVM improvements including basic paravirtualization support, preliminar support of the future 802.11s wireless mesh standard, much improved webcam support thanks to a driver for UVC devices, a built-in memory tester, a kernel debugger, BDI statistics and parameters exposure in /sys/class/bdi, a new /proc/PID/mountinfo file for more accurate information about mounts, per-process securebits, device white-list for containers users, support for the OLPC, some new drivers and many small improvements. Full list of changes here"
top

Linux kernel v2.6.23 released

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 6 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "After 3 months, Linus has released Linux 2.6.23. This version includes the new and shiny CFS process scheduler, a simpler read-ahead mechanism, the lguest 'Linux-on-Linux' paravirtualization hypervisor, XEN guest support, KVM smp guest support, variable process argument length, SLUB is now the default slab allocator, SELinux protection for exploiting null dereferences using mmap, XFS and ext4 improvements, PPP over L2TP support, the 'lumpy' reclaim algorithm, a userspace driver framework, the O_CLOEXEC file descriptor flag, splice improvements, a new fallocate() syscall, lock statistics, support for multiqueue network devices, various new drivers and many other minor features and fixes — see the changelog for details"
Link to Original Source
top

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 7 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "Torvalds has released Linux 2.6.21 after months of development. This release improves the virtualization with VMI, a paravirtualization interface that will be used by Vmware. KVM does get initial paravirtualization support along with live migration and host suspend/resume support. 2.6.21 also gets a tickless idle loop mechanism called "Dynticks", built in top of "clockevents", another feature that unifies the timer handling and brings true high-resolution timers. Other features are: bigger kernel parameter-line, support for the PA SEMI PWRficient CPU and for the Cell-based "celleb" Toshiba architecture, NFS IPv6 support, IPv4 IPv6 IPSEC tunneling, UFS2 write, kprobes for PPC32, kexec and oprofile for ARM, public key encription for ecryptfs, Fcrypt and Camilla cipher algorithms, NAT port randomization, audit lockdown mode, some new drivers and many other small improvements."
top

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 7 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "After two months of development, Linux 2.6.20 has been released. This release includes two different virtualization implementations: KVM: full-virtualization capabilities using Intel/AMD virtualization extensions and a paravirtualization implementation usable by different hypervisors. Aditionally, 2.6.20 includes PS3 support, a fault injection debugging feature, UDP-lite support, better per-process IO accounting, relative atime, relocatable x86 kernel, some x86 microoptimizations, lockless radix-tree readside, shared pagetables for hugetbl, and many other things. Read the list of changes for more details."
top

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 7 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "According to Netcraft February statistics, this month is the first time Apache's market share has been below 60% since Septembre 2002. The graphics show how Apache has been bleeding market share for the last year, right before it almost touched the 70% line. Is Apache losing the lead and the security reputation it has maintained for years, is the Microsoft's "Secure Development Cycle" paying off ?"
top

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 7 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "After two months, Linux 2.6.19 has been released. It includes the clustering GFS2 filesystem, Ecryptfs , the first developer-oriented version of EXT4, support for the Atmel AVR32 architecture, sleepable RCU, improvements for NUMA-based systems, a "-o flush" mount option aimed at FAT-based hotpluggable media devices (mp3), physical CPU hotplug and memory hot-add in x86-64, support for compiling x86 kernels with the GCC stack protection and many other things. You can check the full list of changes in LinuxChanges"
top

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 7 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "After 2 months, 2.6.19 has been released. This release includes the clustering GFS2 filesystem, Ecryptfs , the first experimental version of EXT4 (aimed at developers), support for the Atmel AVR32 architecture, sleepable RCU, improvements for NUMA-based systems, a "-o flush" mount option aimed at FAT-based hotpluggable media devices (mp3), physical CPU hotplug and memory hot-add in x86-64, support for compiling x86 kernels with the GCC stack protection, vectored async I/O , the Netlabel subsystem , allow to disable compilation of the block layer, IDE Parallel-ATA drivers based in libata , Granular IPSec associations for use in MLS environments, Mobile IPv6, some new drivers, improved support for many already existing drivers...you can read the full changelog at LinuxChanges"
top

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Diego Calleja writes "The Register has published a interesting history of how their site was about to be taken off because of a DMCA complaint. The published a photo without having permissions and despite of addressing the problem by email, the photo owner fired off a DMCA takedown notice. It isn't amazing how fast works justice depending on the subject? "So our entire site would have been closed for business, all because of one photograph — admittedly not ours to republish. This did not strike us an entirely proportionate response, and it brought home to us how easy it is to use the DMCA to ambush websites housed in the US or hosted overseas by companies headquartered in the US. We are considering our options for ensuring that we do not face such a situation again""
top

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 7 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "Continuing the new-age flawewar about GPLv3, Linus Torvalds posted an Ode to GPLv2: One of the reasons I didn't end up signing the GPLv3 position statement that James posted (and others had signed up for), was that a few weeks ago I had signed up for writing another kind of statement entirely: not so much about why I dislike the GPLv3, but why I think the GPLv2 is so great"
top

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 7 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "A group of 29 Linux kernel developers have recently come together and produced a position statement on GPLv3 (PDF, txt) explaining why they don't like the GPLv3. "The three key objections noted in section 5 are individually and collectively sufficient reason for us to reject the current licence proposal" [...] "we foresee the release of GPLv3 portends the Balkanisation of the entire Open Source Universe upon which we rely". They've also run a GPLv3 poll"
top

diegocgteleline.es diegocgteleline.es writes  |  more than 6 years ago

diegocgteleline.es writes "After three months of development, Linux 2.6.18 has been released. This release includes lightweight user space priority inheritance support , a "lock validator" debugging tool, a new power saving policy for multicore systems, SMPnice, a much improved SATA layer, a new per-packet access control for SELinux, a few new driversand many other small improvements. Reda the full details in the LinuxChanges documentation."

Journals

diegocgteleline.es has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>