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UK To Allow Driverless Cars By January

digitig Re:Not deploying driverless cars kills people (184 comments)

1. Concorde wasn't discontinued due to passenger safety risks.

[citation needed]

Because of the low fleet flight hours, that one accident gave it the worst safety record of that generation of aircraft. It was retired because it would have been too expensive to make it safe.

yesterday
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UK To Allow Driverless Cars By January

digitig Re:A Progression of Complaints (184 comments)

I, for one, will NEVER ride in or own a vehicle that does not have a steering wheel, foot-actuated throttle pedal, foot-actuated brake pedal, foot-actuated clutch pedal (where applicable), gear selector lever, etc. and I know I'm not alone in this

You never ride the subway, then? I don't think trains have steering wheels...

yesterday
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UK To Allow Driverless Cars By January

digitig Re:A Progression of Complaints (184 comments)

Driving too slow(eg the speed limit) in the passing lane or left most lane is extremely dangerous.

If you're going to drive slowly, the left lane is just the place to do it. You did notice that the article is about the UK, right?

(And I hope they do follow the rules of the road. That will include not pulling out at 65 mph into the path of a car doing 75 mph.)

yesterday
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When Beliefs and Facts Collide

digitig Re:Not surprising. (725 comments)

What has any of this got to do with the ontological argument? Or cosmology? And neither dualism nor (most forms of) idealism have anything to do with solipsism. Are you actually reading what I'm writing? Or just responding to what you wish I'd written? You said "materialism is based on physics". Ok, where's the empirical evidence that favours materialism over rival metaphysical positions, and how would materialism be scientifically falsifiable?

about three weeks ago
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When Beliefs and Facts Collide

digitig Re:Not surprising. (725 comments)

Materialism is based on physics.

Er, no. How can you possibly base materialism (a metaphysical position) on physics? Materialism is (usually) an assumption of physics (some, though not many, physicists assume dualism instead). If you try to use physics to argue for materialism you have a circular argument; the most you can claim from that is that materialism and physics are consistent with each other. Which of course they are, that doesn't make materialism the only metaphysical position consistent with physics.

about three weeks ago
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When Beliefs and Facts Collide

digitig Re:Not surprising. (725 comments)

Dualism is based on nothing, true, but the same can be said for materialism and idealism. You've stepped outside science and into metaphysics, in just the way I described.

Now, it is possible to reason about metaphysics, but trying to argue from science ("based on nothing"), ad-hominem attacks ("don't know shit about "mind" beyond their baseless dogma and refuse to learn about brains") and handwaving ("woo") doesn't make for a coherent case.

Try reading "Aping Humanity" by Raymond Tallis -- prominent atheist, neuroscientist and philosopher -- and you might learn that things are more complex than you think. Assuming you're willing to move beyond baseless dogma, that is.

about three weeks ago
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When Beliefs and Facts Collide

digitig Re:Not surprising. (725 comments)

Much of the rest of the planet (not all) is less polarised between science and religion, and finds ways -- with varying degrees of intellectual credibility -- of accommodating both without significant conflict. Typically that will involve accepting the science where it's pretty definitive (eg, evolution) whilst leaving things open when the science tries to stray into metaphysics (eg, dualism versus materialism).

about three weeks ago
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Amazon Dispute Now Making Movies Harder To Order

digitig Re:Pissing off customers, much? (210 comments)

Actually, there is a good online one-stop-shop available: Google (other search engines are available). If I want a book, DVD or pretty much anything else I Google to see who has it available and at what price. If Amazon don't, hey, I probably won't even notice; I'll be busy comparing price and delivery options for the companies that do.

about 1 month ago
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Uber Demonstrations Snarl Traffic In London, Madrid, Berlin

digitig Re:Competition Sucks (507 comments)

Lawmakers in Britain don't have to do anything, as Uber is already able and does comply with all licensing requirements.

That's in dispute. It hinges on whether the app that Uber divers use to calculate the fare constitutes a taximeter or not. Uber (and Transport for London) say it doesn't because there's no physical connection required with the vehicle, whereas the black cab and minicab drivers say it does because it's a device that calculates the fare based on measured distance travelled. The case has yet to come to court, and until it does nobody really knows whether it's legal or not (personally I suspect it isn't, but IANAL).

about 1 month ago
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America 'Has Become a War Zone'

digitig Re:War of government against people? (875 comments)

Further, the most dangerous cities to live in today, are precisely those cities with the strictest gun control.

I'd like to see that evidence. Worldwide, that is, not just the USA.

And the time series of gun control and violence -- after all, it couldn't be that the gun control is a response to the violence, could it?

about 2 months ago
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Fixing the Humanities Ph.D.

digitig Re:Oh the humanities! (325 comments)

Yes, I spend a lot of my leisure time reading today's "great" literary fiction, and like much of it. I didn't much like Franzen's The Corrections, but then, Franzen's degree is in German, which offers other career opportunities if that writing thing doesn't work out for him. I've not read Don DeLillo, but I note that his degree is in "Communication Arts", but also that he worked as an advertising copywriter before becoming an author, so it looks as if that degree offers other career paths that pay better than waiting at tables.

about 2 months ago
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Fixing the Humanities Ph.D.

digitig Re:market at work (325 comments)

Still counts as a "liberal art" -- it has general application, rather than being specifically vocational.

about 2 months ago
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Fixing the Humanities Ph.D.

digitig Re:Oh the humanities! (325 comments)

They're more likely to your boss (or, more likely given your blinkered attitude, governing the welfare system you depend on) than waiting tables.

about 2 months ago
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Fixing the Humanities Ph.D.

digitig Re:Oh the humanities! (325 comments)

Depends. What do you count as "important"? A lot of great books (which do have commercial value, for the Gradgrinds reading this) are written by English Lit graduates, and are likely better for that. Of course, being an author isn't a "tenure-track job", which the OP seems to think is the only sort of job that matters.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Do 4G World Phones Exist?

digitig Re:Scotland? (259 comments)

The GiffGaff "goodybag" SIM-only bundles look as if they'd be a good option if she's in Glasgow or Edinburgh, because they're a reasonable price with no long-term contractual tie in that I can see. Their 4G coverage doesn't seem to extend to other Scottish towns and cities, though.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Do 4G World Phones Exist?

digitig Re:Scotland? (259 comments)

If "all major locations" means Glasgow and Edinburgh (and Aberdeen & Dundee if you're lucky), yes.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Do 4G World Phones Exist?

digitig Re: Nexus 4? (259 comments)

Then she's going to have to be very picky where she goes in Scotland, or find another source of high speed data.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Do 4G World Phones Exist?

digitig Re: Nexus 4? (259 comments)

And even where there is nominal 4G coverage, it's patchy. I live in London, which is supposed to be pretty well covered by 4G, but much of the time I can't get it.

On the other hand, 3G should be fine in Scotland. Sure, a lot of Scotland has no cellphone signal at all, but that's because a lot of Scotland is wilderness. If the OP's daughter is actually studying in a town, the mobile signal should be fine. And there will be plenty of free WiFi hotspots - coffee shops, bars & McDonalds - if she wants to voip home to ask for money.

about 2 months ago
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Amazon Confirms Hachette Spat Is To "Get a Better Deal"

digitig Re:Time to become a better shopper (211 comments)

I'd be interested to know how much difference Amazon's actions are actually making to Hachette. If I want to buy a book online I Google for it and find a supplier that has it for a reasonable price (and can deliver in reasonable time, if I'm buying the dead tree version). If Amazon doesn't have it or has a long lead time, won't folks just go somewhere else? It's not as if they actually have to walk down the street to get to the next store. As far as I can see, all Amazon is doing is encouraging buyers to check out the competition, but I don't know whether the figures back that up.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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UK Police by covert cellphone surveillance system

digitig digitig writes  |  more than 2 years ago

digitig (1056110) writes "UK Metropolitan Police have purchased a "covert surveillance technology that can masquerade as a mobile phone network, transmitting a signal that allows authorities to shut off phones remotely, intercept communications and gather data about thousands of users in a targeted area."

Other customers apparently include "the US Secret Service, the Ministry of Defence and regimes in the Middle East.""

Link to Original Source
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Computers to mark English essays

digitig digitig writes  |  more than 4 years ago

digitig writes "According to The Guardian newspaper, computers are to be used in the UK to mark English examination essays. According to the article, "Pearson, the American-based parent company of Edexcel, is to use computers to "read" and assess essays for international English tests in a move that has fuelled speculation that GCSEs and A-levels will be next". Can computers now understand all the subtle nuances of language, or are people going to have to learn an especially bland form of English to pass exams?"

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