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Uber CEO: We'll Run Your Errands

digsbo Re:Urban Fetch (139 comments)

You joke, but one of the effects of increasing income inequality can be that the high income group starts to rely on the low income group more and more for these kinds of services.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Smartwatch Apps Could You See Yourself Using?

digsbo Clock. (471 comments)

So I can tell the time, which I currently use my phone for. Oh, I still need a phone?

about two weeks ago
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Using Wearable Tech To Track Gun Use

digsbo You can't fix human nature with tech. (264 comments)

All of this is vanity. We see more and more attempts to "scientifically" control human behavior, instead of setting humans up to succeed in the first place, by having simple, sane laws and what not. End the war on drugs, and you will radically improve relations between the police and the policed in a generation.

about two weeks ago
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UK's National Health Service Moves To NoSQL Running On an Open-Source Stack

digsbo Re:Who knew? (198 comments)

And I just spent mod points on roman_mir.

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Science creates understanding of a real world. (770 comments)

You're not being precise with D, and this is a problem. You need to say over what period humans have increased CO2. Over a long timescale, current CO2 levels are quite low. About half what they were 34 million years ago (760 PPM), before humans existed. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C...

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

Well, what I guess the MMTs call "high powered money" is the monetary base increases caused by Fed open-market purchases of bad commercial and mortgage paper in exchange for "reserves". This is what I was talking about above, and what's detailed here. Of course so little of this has made its way into the money supply, which is what you'd call the money creation by banks, I'm presuming, due to the banks realizing they're still overleveraged and preferring the 25 basis points the Fed is paying them for the excess reserves on account...

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

Thanks. Turns out I was aware of neo-chartalists under the MMT name, though until last night I had not really read up on them much. I must say from what I read they seem to have a strange view of things. To think that money is only a taxable creation of the state is strange to me, and also the claim that insolvency is not a concern of a sovereign that can create fiat currency also seems quite bizarre. Almost as though they separate the value aspect of money from the nominal aspect, which kind of defeats the basis of the "money" concept.

about two weeks ago
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John Romero On Reinventing the Shooter

digsbo Re:Reinvent this, reinvent that. It's all still sh (266 comments)

But how do you know you're not in a local maximum? Not everybody can be Miles Davis and know exactly when something new is working, and be commercially successful at it. Hell, Miles Davis is probably the only person who ever did that in a low-probability field.

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Playing the man and not the ball. (770 comments)

Ok, I have a question. I hear a lot about "tipping point". Isn't it true that in the long run, we saw dramatically higher CO2 concentrations than on your 300 year time scale? Didn't we see a long-term downward trend in CO2? Doesn't this suggest there's not an "irreversible tipping point"? Or are you, too, cherry picking a time scale shorter than the one I'm now using? That's one of the things I'm having a really hard time accepting, because while I can absolutely see a modest increase in temperature due to anthropogenic CO2 emissions, I cannot for the life of me understand the "tipping point" argument, which we head a lot of when we accept reaonable conservative estimates of temperate shifts due to man made CO2 emissions.

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

No, he gave you information which you refused to review, and then called you on it. That's not hypocrisy.

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

I'll have to read up on them. I admit to being unaware of this group.

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

Probably because he's been modded to oblivion inappropriately for saying unpopular things. I'll probably have to do something similar at some point.

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

There's certainly debate on such topics within the community, even among people who are largely Rothbardian. Walter Block is a pretty awesome example of a guy who's expunged any last bit of inconsistency from his arguments. It's a lot of fun, and very enlightening to watch him go back and forth with other libertarians and also non-libertarians. But the in-camp debates certainly help expose the kinds of inconsistencies you're talking about. The child starvation one is kind of interesting, because of course it opens up the question of abortion. And lots of people who are pro-choice don't want to ask the question "when does life begin". This is where Block's "evictionism" is a genuinely interesting concept.

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

Are you saying you don't believe in logic? If you don't, I'm not sure where to go. If you have an actual criticism of the example I gave, go for it.

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

The one thing that has surprised the Austrians and EVERY other economist is that the increase in the monetary base during QE has not increased the money supply appreciably. There are some Austrians suggesting that the inflation is taking place in the asset prices of the stock market. But the real question now is what's going to happen when the huge amount of excess reserves start to be lent out, which will increase the money supply. An increase in the monetary base is not inflationary, even for a Rothbardian. It's the money supply increase they worry aobut. Agree/disagree?

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

There are a shit ton of things in psychology that are only learned through correlative statistics. The best, clearest case is that there is a high correlation between people who experienced sex abuse and who engage in self-injurious behavior (cutting). No one does causative experiments in that area, though. And that same kind of thing is studied across all kinds of behaviors where you wouldn't even *think* of doing a causative experiment.

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

Examples? I'm thinking of neo-Keynesian/Chicago school Bernanke being well convinced the banking crisis was "largely contained" in early 2008. The Austrians were absolutely more accurate on that one.

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

Not so much. The classic example is the minimum wage argument.

A person in a voluntary employment contract at $10/hour that roughly nets his employer a profit of say $10/hour, should he raise his demanded wage to $50/hour (or any arbitrary wage where the employer would no longer be profitable), would certainly become unemployed, either by being substituted with another worker, or by putting his employer out of business. Thus one clearly sees raising a wage causes unemployment. The large size of the raise helps make it clear that this would happen.

In practice, minimum wage and employment effects are nearly impossible to determine, because there can be all kinds of slop in the economic measurements (employers may not lay off immediately and may defer hiring, or may raise prices, or some other factor such as strong economic growth may offset the wage increase). So, we must reject empirical data that says marginal changes of a few percent don't obey the same laws as large changes.

There must then be further study to determine what factors may play into the apparent disagreement between the collected data and the presented argument. But the argument, being clearly true, can't be wrong in this case, so the data must be incomplete.

The climate science parallel is the disagreement between the apparent lack of warming in the past 11 or 17 years and the models. Given the disagreement, investigators had to determine why the model didn't fit the data, indicating a problem in one or the other (both, maybe).

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

digsbo Re:Worse than that... (770 comments)

In economics, the Austrian School folks agree with you so strongly that they reject the notion that empirical data can trump a priori reasoning. Recognizing that there is no "controlled experiment", any data that refutes a well-reasoned logical argument is considered incomplete. It's a remarkable rejection of empiricism and a recognition that economic activity is based on human behavior (praxeology) and as such can't be precisely quantified.

about two weeks ago

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