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Blood For Extra Credit Points Offer Raises Eyebrows In Test-Mad China

dingleberrie Something new (89 comments)

Finally! A form of bribery that almost anyone can afford.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: How To Keep Students' Passwords Secure?

dingleberrie keep the passwords locked up but easy to get to (191 comments)

Use Dropbox (or any cloud service that sync local files) and Keepass 2 (open source) to keep them in an encrypted file that is shared among anyone. You can also do group file sharing in dropbox, though I don't do that with my passwords file.

The keepass file is encrypted.
I've done this for several years. It's awesome. It allows you to change your password for the same site without depending on some algorithm to lock you into only one possible password for that site.
You can add and edit the file and it synchronizes. I can even use mini-keepass on my iphone, also with dropbox, so if I'm ever needing info without my PC, I can grab the password.

I keep credit card info (easier to cut and paste when ordering online) and game and website login info.

4 days ago
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Scientists Twist Radio Beams To Send Data At 32 Gigabits Per Second

dingleberrie Re:Microwaves and 2.4 GHz (122 comments)

I think the special part is that 2.4 GHz is a convenient frequency where there is a balance between a larger amount of energy being absorbed by water and a smaller amount of energy being absorbed by glass and plastic.

about two weeks ago
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New Details About NSA's Exhaustive Search of Edward Snowden's Emails

dingleberrie issue | Snowden (200 comments)

Let's make this about Snowden.
After all, if he didn't raise concerns, then how could they have possibly known there were any issues.

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Killing Off Windows Phone Brand Name In Favor of Just Windows

dingleberrie Re:Brilliant! (352 comments)

You're not trying.
I'm not even a fan of microsoft, but I read slashdot, and I've seen stuff I respect:
* Pushing an innovative and amazing peripheral into the consumer space with XBOX One kinect (Privacy issues and untrustability make this undesirable, but the techology is awesome, and the price is awesomer).
* Rewriting their windows infrastructure so that it boots in 5 seconds, runs well on a tablet and is still compatible with, you know, Windows.
* They beat apple and android to the flat design race. I don't like the look, but it came first, which is the opposite of point C.
* Putting an infrastructure in place to merge the PC, tablet, and phone when the time is right. Maybe this ain't that time, but it's not because of a technological limitation.
* Showing that even a huge company with a long company cultural history can revise and improve SW design processes to move from monolithic releases to rapid releases.

Now I could also release a list of things I don't like, as I could with any company, but there is some major innovation going on at Microsoft now that they have competition.

about two weeks ago
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New York Judge OKs Warrant To Search Entire Gmail Account

dingleberrie Is it the same? (150 comments)

Isn't all criteria, by definition, more narrowly tailored than no criteria?

In your house, you can throw out things and hide others in a secret place, on your hard drive you can throw out things and encrypt others.
Does this Gmail account allow you to throw-out and hide things? Is it really analogous?

about 2 months ago
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Malaysia Airlines Flight 370: Experts Unable To Replicate Inmarsat Analysis

dingleberrie Re:The explanation is simple (245 comments)

So why did WTC 7, that third building that was not hit by a plane, collapse as though the top floor had nothing under it?
I posted that question a few months ago, but got no suggestions. I'd be open to any theory that has a rational explanation.

I see videos on youtube if I search for wtc7.

about 5 months ago
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China Using Troop of Trained Monkeys To Guard Air Base

dingleberrie solved one problem... (119 comments)

In other news, an increasing number of macaques are being caught in aircraft engines.

about 5 months ago
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New Shape Born From Rubber Bands

dingleberrie Re:New? (120 comments)

What's a telephone cord?
#LOLZ #oldthings

about 5 months ago
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The Limits of Big Data For Social Engineering

dingleberrie It's controllable. This just makes it observable. (95 comments)

And who shapes our perception of history, politics, and economics, power and prejudice?

I'm still waiting for the media to publicly question the cause of WTC tower 7 collapse as hard as they've questioned any heart-tugging story about someone that went missing.

about 5 months ago
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The Best Parking Apps You've Never Heard Of and Why You Haven't

dingleberrie Maybe it's the nature of this app (163 comments)

Guys, why all the vitriol for this article? Slashvertisement? It doesn't matter. He went out of his way to point out two different apps and an experiment that he did, where he shared the results.

The topic, for the TL;DR people is essentially why are good apps unseen while poorer ones are popular. He cited ParkMe and BestParking as his basis of research.

It's a questions that would apply to nerds want to popularize an app, but don't understand the phenomena that encourage apps to spread regardless of feature set.

Personally, I use BestParking for my trips to New York City, but agree that it is rarely discussed, so I guess it is rarely known. Maybe it is the nature of parking. Many people who park want to park and move on. They don't think about it after the act, so don't want to think about it much earlier either. It is not a long, drawn out thing (like finding a place to live) where you often plan. Additionally, you can't easily use the app while driving, which is what you are doing when you most think of needing to use the App. So maybe this one is the nature of the activity itself. People don't think about it, so it never gets enough buzz to become a topic of conversation so the knowledge of it doesn't spread.

about 5 months ago
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How Many People Does It Take To Colonize Another Star System?

dingleberrie answered a long time ago (392 comments)

According to a book I've read: Two of opposite gender (along with some other people from somewhere).

about 6 months ago
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Last Week's Announcement About Gravitational Waves and Inflation May Be Wrong

dingleberrie Creationisticism (194 comments)

This aspect of the story is great as an example of science.
It seems stubborn to hold onto a single interpretation of evidence during pursuit a theory, including the origin of the universe.
Science is the willingness to relegate that evidence to be less significant than what some people want it to be.
When you won't relegate the evidence, then you are practicing faith (in the evidence) instead of science.

about 6 months ago
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How Do You Backup 20TB of Data?

dingleberrie Re:If you want to hoard bits... (983 comments)

At home I have four 4TB seagate USB 3.0 backup plus drives for 16 TB of backup. I have too much backup storage so that I can allow for not fully using the drives.
I run Cobian backup (as an incremental directory duplicator) and just pick different directories (and disks) to back up. BTW, I bought a USB 3.0 card to give me those ports, so that's not an excuse either.

This does not solve the problem of bitrot, (looking at building a ZFS for that), but it is a simple way to have a scalable backup system for most usages.

I don't get why you can't plug in an external drive.

about 7 months ago
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Making Sure Our Lab Equipment Isn't Tricking Us

dingleberrie Re:Superdeterminism (108 comments)

I knew you were going to say that.

about 7 months ago
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Chimpanzee "Personhood" Lawsuits Fail In New York Courts

dingleberrie hierarchy of rights (370 comments)

I'm trying to keep up, but I think this is the hierarchy of rights that I have seen in the US.
It's hard to settle on the exact order. Each item could up or down one level.

1 People in my country.
2 Corporations
3 People in other countries
4 People in other countries who look like they have nothing
5 Cute animals
6 Monkeys that aren't so cute
7 non-cute things that can't harm me
8 scary things

about 10 months ago
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FTC Drops the Hammer On Maker of Location-Sharing Flashlight App

dingleberrie Why can't they copy this from iOS? (187 comments)

I have an iPhone 5 and a Nexus 7.
When I download an app on the Nexus, I always feel an uneasiness as I look at all the access it wants to my contacts and other invasively unnecessary permissions. So each time I must make a decision to accept or reject using the app. I've rejected some that just seem overreaching, but I've become less strict over time... like I'm accepting to lose a battle. I assure myself, that my phone has all my real contacts, not my Nexus 7 and then begrudgingly accept the conditions. This is one reason I will not use an android phone and why I rarely download apps on android.
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/12/06/1452241/ftc-drops-the-hammer-on-maker-of-location-sharing-flashlight-app#
iOS, for those that don't know, will let me decline permissions to track my location or share my contacts on a per-app basis. Even if I enabled it before, I can go into the control center and disable it. I don't benefit from that aspect of the iOS app, but I'm fine with that. For all the control that Android is supposed to give the user, iOS shines here and I wish that is one thing that Android would copy.

about 10 months ago
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Saudi Justice: 10 Years and 2,000 Lashes For Internet Video of Naked Dancing

dingleberrie Re:Don't forget Ananias (537 comments)

Oh, I get it now. Good cop / Bad cop.
Never thought it of that way before.

about a year ago
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Some Bing Ads Redirecting To Malware

dingleberrie Re:Proof (146 comments)

This is a tautology, too.

about a year ago
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GTA V Proves a Lot of Parents Still Don't Know or Care About ESRB Ratings

dingleberrie Re:Some people... (621 comments)

Maybe you have a good point about religions being exclusive, but let's not confuse the texts with religions.
For example, there are only a few bible variations (King James version, American Standard Version, New American Standard, etc), compared to the 42,000+ different denominations of Christianity... each of those is a different religion calling themselves more correct on their interpretation than others. Some are exclusive with their own heaven and others are not... various levels of exclusivity. Even within a denomination each person has their own set of beliefs that may be inclusive or exclusive about race, sexual preference, etc. Religions tend to congeal around people who proclaim their beliefs in a way that other people want to listen and agree.

I've read different text translations of things that are not Christian. Not all religions, but enough to be satisfied. Some parts can be considered encompassing (aka, turn the other cheek) and some parts can be interpreted as exclusionary (e.g. follow him to get into heaven, with often indirect rationale that he is the only path). It is up to the religion/people how they want to interpret these.

So the texts say good things to good people and exclusive things to exclusive people.

1 year,4 days

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