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Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X

disambiguated Re:enable trim on yosemite (327 comments)

Disabling the security check is a bad idea though. It's just better to run all your malware in userspace. :)

You should not have to choose between using 3rd party hardware and having a secure system.

about a month ago
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Microsoft To Open Source .NET and Take It Cross-Platform

disambiguated Re:Real cross-platform is HARD (525 comments)

It's nowhere near as hard as you're claiming. Those are bad practices even if you only ever intend to run on Windows. And .NET has had portable ways to do these things since version 1.0, and always encouraged their use.

The example above illustrates that; it is way more conventient to combine pathnames with such a non-portable string concatenation than it is with the right approach.

To me the correct, portable code looks easier to read and write. You don't have to check if directoryname already has a trailing seperator, for example. The Path APIs will also handle .. (and ~/ on linux).

In practice there are only a handful of things you need to know to write portable code in .NET. It was always designed to be cross-platform.

about a month ago
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Microsoft To Open Source .NET and Take It Cross-Platform

disambiguated Re:RIP Java! (525 comments)

There is no interpreter -- .NET code is never interpreted. The output of the C# compiler is CIL (Common Intermediate Language), which is akin to the output of the front end of the LLVM compilers (called IR "Intermediate Representation"). (note: .NET is older than LLVM)

In both .NET and LLVM, the intermediate language is not suitable for interpretation. It is always translated into native machine instructions before execution. In .NET that can either be at runtime (JITed) or install time (NGENed).

I'm simplifying of course. They don't need to write an interpreter, they need to write a back-end and port the runtime components.

Also, I don't think there's much if any C/C++ left in it, it's C# all the way down.

about a month ago
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I'm most interested in robots that will...

disambiguated Re:Pleasure (307 comments)

Give it a little time, you won't like your kids either.

about a month ago
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Black IT Pros On (Lack Of) Racial Diversity In Tech

disambiguated Re:Yeah, right... (459 comments)

It really does not make any sense.

I totally agree. I've conducted dozens of interviews for software engineers. I couldn't hire a black developer if my life depended on it -- I've never had a black candidate. I know the recruiters aren't to blame -- they're desperate for qualified candidates. There were no black people in my university classes either. The dearth of women in IT gets plenty of headlines, but I've known lots of women programmers, including 3 bosses over the years. In my entire career, I've only ever known one black programmer.

It must start long before high school.

about a month ago
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New Book Argues Automation Is Making Software Developers Less Capable

disambiguated Re:And Self-Actualization is not the goal. (212 comments)

Employer's have no incentive to care whether or not their employees are bored

That is just categorically wrong, in any industry. It's laughable in the software industry where getting and keeping employees is one of the biggest challenges.

You obviously don't work in the software industry. Employers not only tolerate all kinds of non productive things, they actively encourage them. Software engineers are treated like spoiled, geeky royalty.

The moment you, as an employee, start arguing that you should invest the employer's time in something that is less profitable but more interesting, you will be replaced.

OK, now I know you don't work in software engineering. Or any engineering. Trying to convince our employer to do things that are less profitable but more interesting is what we do.

about a month ago
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New Book Argues Automation Is Making Software Developers Less Capable

disambiguated Re:sounds a lot like an argument I hear a lot (212 comments)

C is not going anywhere any time soon.

I think it's a myth that people aren't learning C. I interview a lot of devs, many just out of college. Most of them know C/C++. They may be more comfortable with Java/C#/whatever, but they at least know C++ syntax and understand the memory model, etc. It would make no sense for universities to ignore C/C++, if for no other reason than the huge amount of code out there in those languages that you may need to understand. Kids in CS these days are still writing their own compilers, toy OSs and memory managers.

High level languages are more productive, no doubt about that, so it makes sense to learn them. But lower level knowledge is not made obsolete. You're still better off knowing C/C++ and some machine-level things, at least enough to read the code, understand a stack trace, memory dump, single step through compiled code, etc. So learning the high level tools is in addition to the traditional tools, not instead of them.

about a month ago
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New Book Argues Automation Is Making Software Developers Less Capable

disambiguated Re:Agreed.. (212 comments)

Yeah, I miss the days when we coders worked closer to the metal, calling getelementid directly instead of using some high level abstraction like jquery.

about a month ago
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New Book Argues Automation Is Making Software Developers Less Capable

disambiguated Re:That's true, but... (212 comments)

Anyone who thinks that programming is getting easier due to automation isn't a programmer.

I'll second that. I've been coding professionally for almost 20 years. Even done some assembly. Yes the tools are much better and more is automated, but the amount you need to know is only growing, and the expectations have never been higher. I don't think the automation is even keeping up actually. Making software is not getting easier.

about a month ago
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fMRI Data Reveals How Many Parallel Processes Run In the Brain

disambiguated Re:yes (91 comments)

our brains are not "like computers" in how they work

True enough, but that says nothing about what kinds of processing can be realized in either. There are so many layers of abstraction between the brain and the mind that it doesn't make sense to say that minds are made of neurons. Minds are made of abstract things which are made of abstract things, (which are... etc, etc), which are eventually made of neurons. But they could eventually be made of transistors, what does it matter how the bottom few layers work?

about a month and a half ago
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Amazon's Luxembourg Tax Deals

disambiguated Re:jury (200 comments)

They're just playing the game that's being played, they all do it. For example: Apple's Tax Strategy
They'd be incompetent if they didn't. You can order your own tax sandwich here (pdf)

about a month and a half ago
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New Website Offers Provably Fair Solutions To Everyday Problems

disambiguated Re:Hold up now (167 comments)

Oops, I guess I did imply that. I just meant that their are good reasons why the tax code is complicated, and that shouldn't prevent the taxation of intellectual property. The whole system needs massive reform anyway; companies that own a lot of IP already put them in holding companies and then licence them back to themselves.

about a month and a half ago
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New Website Offers Provably Fair Solutions To Everyday Problems

disambiguated Re:sibling fairness (167 comments)

Hmm.... Maybe they should do this with intellectual property.

The owner of intellectual property would be taxed based on a value the owner specifies annually. The government would have the option to purchase it for that amount, perhaps with an added premium. If the property is sold, the purchaser is taxed initially based on what they paid. Licences & royalties would be limited based on the taxed value.

I was about to say maybe this would be too complicated to get right... then I remembered our tax code.

about a month and a half ago
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The Fight Over the EFF's Secure Messaging Scoreboard

disambiguated Re:OpenPGP (63 comments)

Found a nice simple explanation of how this works here. There is a secret somewhere that isn't compromised, but it is ephemeral and isn't ever stored anywhere or transmitted. So that's what you meant by "long term". It's very clever. Makes perfect sense now, but it's counterintuitive, at least to me.

Anyway, thanks. I learned something new, which is why I still come to /.

about a month and a half ago
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The Fight Over the EFF's Secure Messaging Scoreboard

disambiguated Re:OpenPGP (63 comments)

even if all the long-term secrets (passwords, keys, etc.) involved in a conversation are stolen, the person who stole them cannot go back and decrypt the encrypted messages.

I can't wrap my head around that. The way you've described it, it isn't possible, unless the original intended recipient also can't decrypt it. There must be at least one secret somewhere that isn't compromised (the recipient's private key maybe).

BTW, does your sig ever get you modded redundant? :)

about a month and a half ago
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The Fight Over the EFF's Secure Messaging Scoreboard

disambiguated Re:Don't buy American. (63 comments)

You're right. They usually aren't, but unintentional vulnerabilities can be subtle. Intentional vulnerabilities can be subtle to the point of genius. If you're just casually reviewing code that isn't specifically known to be vulnerable, and especially if the vulnerability is intentional, it may never be discovered.

This is why security sensitive functions need to be system code, not application code. System code, and hopefully coders, tend to get more scrutiny, have higher standards of quality, and have a more conservative approach in general. Repeating security functions in each application is insane.

about a month and a half ago
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The Fight Over the EFF's Secure Messaging Scoreboard

disambiguated Re:Don't buy American. (63 comments)

How are you going to test a CPU? Unless you analyze the circuits physically, how are you going to do that it doesn't allow privileged instructions in unprivledged code e.g. when r14=6368696e65736520, r15=6261636b646f6f72?

about a month and a half ago
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Net Neutrality Alone Won't Solve ISP Throttling Abuse, Here's Why

disambiguated Re:nope (200 comments)

I don't think that's (usually) true, but I'm no expert. My understanding is that latency is an issue because of excessive amounts of buffering in routers, because RAM is cheap and they can.

about a month and a half ago
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Net Neutrality Alone Won't Solve ISP Throttling Abuse, Here's Why

disambiguated Re:When you encrypt everything... (200 comments)

Exactly. The payload is encrypted, not the entire packet. You can't route traffic if you don't know where it's going. If people start watching Netflix through tunnels, the ISPs will just throttle tunnels.

Net neutrality doesn't have to mean that each packet is equally important, it should just mean that the ISPs and backbone network should be neutral about it. How about letting the endpoints decide how to prioritize their own traffic? Seems like an obvious way to stop abuse from ISPs and still get QoS for things that need it like games and video.

about a month and a half ago
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EFF Begins a Campaign For Secure and Usable Cryptography

disambiguated I don't get it. (96 comments)

I don't get it. This makes absolutely no sense. A page full of apps each with their own implementation of encryption is not what we need. Why are we doing this at the application level? Have we all gone insane?

In the face of widespread Internet surveillance, we need a secure and practical means of talking to each other from our phones and computers.

Agreed. I have a suggestion: internet layer encryption that hasn't been compromised by the NSA?

about a month and a half ago

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