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Nokia Had an Android Phone In Development

divisionbyzero How much of a role did an Android phone play... (189 comments)

in the acquisition? Exactly fuck all. Really, do you think Microsoft would pay $7.5 just to avoid yet another Android also-ran competitor?

about a year ago
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UK High Court Gives OK To Investigation of Data Siezed From David Miranda

divisionbyzero Endangering or possibly endangering...? (165 comments)

Big difference. Former requires probability and evidence. Latter is an invitation to a fishing expedition.

about a year ago
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Silicon Valley's Loony Cheerleading Culture Is Out of Control

divisionbyzero Isn't this how it always goes? (1 comments)

A bunch of wannabees try to start companies 99.999% fail but some succeed and we get the next decade's great companies. Until the next decade.

about a year ago
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Why Computers Still Don't Understand People

divisionbyzero Because they don't understand purpose or intention (277 comments)

That's why. They don't have desires, fears, or joys. Without those it's impossible to understand, in any meaningful sense, human beings. That's not to say that they can't have them but it's likely to come with trade-offs that are unappealing. And for good measure, they also don't understand novelty and cannot for the most part improvise. All of which are considered hallmarks of human intelligence.

1 year,5 days
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Dishwasher-Size, 25kW Fuel Cell In Development

divisionbyzero And it's called the Perpetuum Mobile! (379 comments)

Sorry, it's hard not to be snarky with claims of energy breakthroughs. There is always a trade-off. What is it?

1 year,5 days
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EFF Slams Google Fiber For Banning Servers On Its Network

divisionbyzero The problem with ideological purity is... (301 comments)

nobody is perfect. And so the ideologues turn on themselves fighting with each other rather than the greater enemy, cableco and telco, and so dissolve into an ineffectual cacophony. Comcast must be grinning.

1 year,9 days
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Fighting Street Gangs With Military Counter-Insurgency Software

divisionbyzero Re:Or we could just... (171 comments)

How about legalizing or decriminalizing those things sold on a black market removing the financial incentives?

Stuff like meth, heroin, difficult-to-trace guns, stolen property, murder-for-hire services? The average street level thugs works longer hours for effectively less than minimum wage anyway, so it's not as if they are going to become perfectly rational citizens when the easy money is cut off.

How about early intervention through more funding for pre-schools in urban areas to provide the structure the kids' parents cannot?

No matter how much you `early-intervention' a student, seeing their neighbors killed in a drive-by or stabbed by a junkie over a pair of shoes is going to fuck them up and cause them to despair and lead them to seek revenge (usually by joining a gang).

Yes, those might be good ideas, but the gangsters have got to fucking go before anything like that can even begin to work. A police force not consisting of bullies, morons, or cowards too scared to get out of their fucking car would go a long way too. How to attack this problem? I do not know. But it doesn't appear that softer methods are working very much. How many more generations can we afford to let be eaten alive before we can bring out the big guns?

And you would know this from first hand experience? Or, are you relying on "common sense"? Human beings are more resilient than you might expect and many kids that grow up in these environments don't turn into gangsters.

about a year ago
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Fighting Street Gangs With Military Counter-Insurgency Software

divisionbyzero Re:Or we could just... (171 comments)

give them jobs

Give them???? How many trillions of dollars have been transfered from the workers to the non-workers, and how effective has it actually been?

Besides, why work mowing grass and digging ditches (what else are they qualified for, given their piss poor grades in their piss poor schools) when (a) that's "Mexican work", and (b) you can make more by selling drugs and living off the dole?

Well, I'm glad we got the two most worn-out stereotypes out of the way so quickly. Now maybe we can have a useful conversation. How about legalizing or decriminalizing those things sold on a black market removing the financial incentives? How about early intervention through more funding for pre-schools in urban areas to provide the structure the kids' parents cannot? Or about a million other things that would be more effective than "hand-outs" or "policing the lazy".

about a year ago
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How Silicon Valley's Tech Reign Will End

divisionbyzero Decentralization and diversification (395 comments)

The tension created by "City vs. Suburbs" is strictly for the benefit of the story. Existing companies are opening new offices in urban areas but for the most part they aren't closing offices in the suburbs. Sure, new companies are often starting in cities but they will likely open suburban offices if they survive long enough. It's a healthy kind of diversification that will likely reach some sort of equilibrium over the next decade or two. Does that mean the stature of suburbs will decrease a bit while that of cities increases? Sure, but talk of "winners" and "losers" in some binary or zero-sum sense is overblown.

about a year ago
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Introducing the NSA-Proof Crypto-Font

divisionbyzero Re:Missing the point... (259 comments)

I think most commenters here will end up completely missing the point, just as I initially did. Of course it will be trivial to bypass any possible protection the font might briefly provide, but that isn't the point. The making of the font is a political statement against government machinery and software spying on us and taking our humanity away. As such, I'd say it's quite clever and attention-getting.

Now I'll sit back and watch 50 different people get up-modded for pedantically explaining how it will be trivial to train an OCR to recognize the font and how software reads the bytecodes and doesn't care about the font and blah blah blah...

Is that a giant whooshing sound I hear?

Either way, it's still lame. I mean the pedants are obnoxious but so are pointless political gestures.

Oh gosh, my sincerest apologies. I'll be sure to let everyone know that all political gestures need to be cleared by you first. You know, to make sure they're not "lame".

Yeah, please do. It'd save everyone a lot of wasted time and effort. Thanks.

about a year ago
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Introducing the NSA-Proof Crypto-Font

divisionbyzero Re:Missing the point... (259 comments)

I think most commenters here will end up completely missing the point, just as I initially did. Of course it will be trivial to bypass any possible protection the font might briefly provide, but that isn't the point. The making of the font is a political statement against government machinery and software spying on us and taking our humanity away. As such, I'd say it's quite clever and attention-getting.

Now I'll sit back and watch 50 different people get up-modded for pedantically explaining how it will be trivial to train an OCR to recognize the font and how software reads the bytecodes and doesn't care about the font and blah blah blah...

Is that a giant whooshing sound I hear?

Either way, it's still lame. I mean the pedants are obnoxious but so are pointless political gestures.

about a year ago
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MIT President Tells Grads To 'Hack the World'

divisionbyzero Re:MIT Hacks (86 comments)

At MIT, the word "hack" means something very specific, and not criminal or unethical. It is a impressive, creative, and clever achievement.

From http://hacks.mit.edu/

The word hack at MIT usually refers to a clever, benign, and "ethical" prank or practical joke, which is both challenging for the perpetrators and amusing to the MIT community (and sometimes even the rest of the world!). Note that this has nothing to do with computer (or phone) hacking (which we call "cracking").

So, the president of MIT was urging MIT students to pull clever practical jokes? That's stupid or he meant something different. Presumably he meant "hack" in the same way that people who have been actually involved with computers understand it: exploring the possibilities of a system (often including some that the inventor never intended) for the sake of discovery and in some cases using those discoveries to create unique and innovative outcomes. I get that you are trying to make a distinction between "hacking" and "cracking" but "hacking" has a meaning that transcends the special case of practical jokes that are a part of MIT folklore and if the president of MIT did not have the broader meaning in mind, then his comments are almost comical.

about a year ago
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One Year After World IPv6 Launch — Are We There Yet?

divisionbyzero Re:What groundswell? (246 comments)

Not a single business partner, client, or home user that I've dealt with for the last 3 year has an active IPv6 DNS registration. _None_.

The critical factor for IPv4 exhaustion was the lack of "/24" addres spaces for businesses and buildings. This has been impressively ameliorated by the use of NAT, which shares numerous intenral and protected IP addresses behind a single or pair of public addresses and should be the _default_ configuraiton in most businesses and organizaitons, simply to reduce the constant external vulnerability scanning of any host directly connected to the Internet.

The growth of high capacity load balancers for web servers and other network services has also helped tremendously, allowing a wide set of behind the scenes hosts to be serviced by a single exposed device and reducing the IPv4 footprint of these services. Also, people have learned how to economize in the ir IPv4 use: They _do no tneed_ a different IP address for their email server, their FTP server, their web server, their phone server, their chat server, and their IRC server. The services are being easily funneled through a single exposed router or firewall, far more efficiently than before.

The result has been that the great need for IPv6 simply has not yet occurred, and is unlikely to occur for another 10 years. The foundation of the need for IPv6 is basically that of ubiquitous comuputing: the idea that every single device scattered around the home or around the workplace will have its own IP address for remote communications, and they _should not have_ public IP addresses. Providing public, routable IP addresses puts them at risk of attack at all times: putting them in the unroutable, easily tracked and maintained IPv4 address space handles almost all internal network needs quie effectively and is a signigicant security advantage and eases scanning and tracking of local resources.

Um, yeah, creating a single bottleneck and point of attack to the internet seems like a great idea... It's not that your ideas don't have merit (although you do over state and misstate some of them) but that they only address the needs of a certain set of users. NAT is not an unmitigated good. NAT has significant shortcomings.

about a year ago
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NSA Building $860 Million Data Center In Maryland

divisionbyzero Re:Fixing the problem (177 comments)

It's become clear that the federal government no longer serves the interests of the people.

Does anyone have suggestions for fixing the problem?

Whenever some "government done did wrong again" article comes up, the comments are all non-constructive: blithe unconcern, fatalism, pessimism, and so on.

What constructive actions can be taken, and how can the people be encouraged to support these actions?

My one idea: If people could band together and agree to vote out the incumbent (senator, representative, president) whenever one of these incidents crop up, there would be incentive for politicians to better serve the people in order to continue in office. This would mean giving up party loyalty and the idea of "lessor of two evils", which a lot of people won't do. Some congressional elections are quite close, so 2,000 or so petitioners might be enough to swing a future election.

(And no, replies of "you won't accomplish anything because of this reason" are not constructive.)

Eliminate the two party duopoly by voting for a third-party candidate.

about a year ago
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Average latency to Slashdot.org?

divisionbyzero Re:Distance estimates not accurate for consumers.. (558 comments)

Not all consumer ISPs. If you buy your Internet connectivity purely on the basis of price then you deserve what you get.

There are good ISPs too though.

You say, "purely on the basis of price" like I have a choice. My only choice for high speed internet is Comcast.

about a year ago
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Average latency to Slashdot.org?

divisionbyzero Distance estimates not accurate for consumers... (558 comments)

using an ISP. They might be right for corporate or education users that have a commercial agreement with a network provider but consumer ISPs do all sorts of things to lower costs that negatively impact latency.

about a year ago
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Possible Cure For MS Turns Common Skin Cells Into Working Brain Cells

divisionbyzero Re:So the next quesiton is.... (87 comments)

Now that you've made myelin, how do you get it to stick to actual damaged neurons and/or brian cells. If you inject it in there, is it naturally just going to bind to damaged cells?

Yeah, exactly. Otherwise I don't think clumps of myelin just floating around the brain are going to be a good thing.

about a year ago
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Google Fiber: Why Traditional ISPs Are Officially On Notice

divisionbyzero Re:I may be most libertarian but... (408 comments)

I think states and cities should be rolling out their own fiber. Sort of like building roads. And then subsidize installation for last mile fiber for any homeowner that can afford $1000. They don't need to install the network equipment but they can or they can lease the lines to businesses. The state could fund a redundant backbone network that the cities could trunk into. Just design the lines to be replaced every 30 years.

Cites could then individually choose to offer "free" internet. Of course that would mean they would just subcontract out to a business to provide the network equipment and service. Cities pay for these sorts of things through property taxes.

  I may be libertarian but I classify this as necessary infrastructure that will benefit the vast majority. Everything else is just more expensive.

I absolutely agree. I don't know why it hasn't happened yet. Presumably FUD and resistance from incumbent monopolies.

about a year ago

Submissions

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divisionbyzero divisionbyzero writes  |  more than 7 years ago

divisionbyzero (300681) writes "Many people have asked for it in order that the government will have to deal with it. So here it is: a guide to stealing an election that uses electronic voting machines written by Jon Stokes over at Arstechnica: http://arstechnica.com/articles/culture/evoting.ar s From the article: "In all this time, I've yet to find a good way to convey to the non-technical public how well and truly screwed up we presently are, six years after the Florida recount. So now it's time to hit the panic button: In this article, I'm going to show you how to steal an election.""

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