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Comments

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Parallax Completes Open Hardware Vision With Open Source CPU

dos1 Re:Why is this important? (136 comments)

There're also OpenBSC and OsmocomBB. However, even with all these projects there's still a pretty steep barrier to enter, which would disappear if open basebands in mobile phones would somehow become common.

about three weeks ago
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Parallax Completes Open Hardware Vision With Open Source CPU

dos1 Re:Why is this important? (136 comments)

Actually, knowing the state of security in cellular networks - especially old 2G and availability of "downgrade to 2G" techniques for newer ones - despite of being strong FLOSS and OH supporter I'm kinda glad that any tech-curious kid next door can't easily play with baseband in his mobile phone.

Sadly, there's also kind of people that won't care that it's illegal and with enough motivation will get all needed hardware, so we're not really protected either way.

about three weeks ago
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Georgia Tech Researchers Jailbreak iOS 7.1.2

dos1 Re:Why? (136 comments)

But how's that on-topic? What "rooting a phone" has in common with "disabling LTE cap"? (whatever you mean by that)
There is no "secret cap switch" that allows one to get ultra-speed while downgrading the connection to everyone else in neighborhood. The connection is managed by the modem with its own, closed and cryptographically signed firmware, which uses (or at least tries to use) 3GPP standards. It's completely unrelated to any "jailbreaking" or "rooting" that was discussed here.

Actually, when mangling with modem, "saturating LTE" is something you'd worry about as a last thing. There are much better things to do when you for instance force downgrade to 2G on your neighbors - then you can apply all sorts of man-in-the-middle, eavesdropping, spoofing, DoS attacks and much more. Cellular networks are built with an assumption that only certified hardware can transmit on them - and a lot of modems and BTSes blindly trust that this is really the case (after all, when you start to transmit with modified modem, like TI Calypso with OsmocomBB, you're breaking the laws, cause modifying its firmware made its certification void).

However, as I said, that has nothing to do with the concept of "jailbreaking" or "rooting". Maybe you know somehow the physical layer of GSM, but for sure don't really know how it's all implemented in modern smartphones.

about three weeks ago
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Cell Phone Unlocking Is Legal -- For Now

dos1 Re:SIM locks? (135 comments)

It's a myth and I've already seen a lot of people from US debunking it. And even if it would be somewhat true, there are people in US who use their Openmoko Neo Freerunners and Goldelico GTA04s, or who preordered their Neo900, which were never (and never will be) locked to anything other than operating frequency.

Buying a phone in the US without simlock is far from being impossible. It's just a bit harder - well, for some people the difference may be negligible, but then no regulation will help them...

about three weeks ago
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Georgia Tech Researchers Jailbreak iOS 7.1.2

dos1 Re:Why? (136 comments)

You obviously have no idea how mobile internet connection works, don't you?

about three weeks ago
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Cell Phone Unlocking Is Legal -- For Now

dos1 SIM locks? (135 comments)

I wonder why the comments are filled with discussion about SIM locks and operators unlocking or not the devices after the end of contract. SIM-lock issue is no biggie, you can always simply buy the phone without telco as middleman.

What's more important there is that without this DMCA exception, you can't legally "jailbreak" your phone, install your own operating system or some "custom ROMs". Without this exception, jailbreaking an iPhone to install Cydia is illegal; breaking into bootloader of some non-unlockable by default Android phone is illegal as well.

Without this exception, in America you're not free to choose the software to run on your own hardware if only the producer doesn't want you to. Duh, even worse - it's actually illegal to try to. *This* is the clue of this issue, not any silly simlocks.

about three weeks ago
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Lots Of People Really Want Slideout-Keyboard Phones: Where Are They?

dos1 Nothing surprising (544 comments)

There's a reason why Neo900 is Neo900 and not Neo9.

about a month ago
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Private Data On iOS Devices Not So Private After All

dos1 Re:Yeah (101 comments)

It's enough to have a friend PC compromised, where you connected your iPhone once, a year ago, to recharge your battery and you don't even remember that now. When his computer is compromised, your phone becomes compromised as well and vulnerable to remote attacks.

That's a bit different story than what you described above.

about a month ago
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Researcher Finds Hidden Data-Dumping Services In iOS

dos1 Re:DON'T PANIC (98 comments)

to not buy*, of course.

about a month ago
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Researcher Finds Hidden Data-Dumping Services In iOS

dos1 Re:DON'T PANIC (98 comments)

You have a choice to buy iOS, Android, Windows or BlackBerry phones.

My Openmoko, SHR, Maemo, QtMoko and Debian based phones are a nice example. And they all work pretty well! It wasn't always the case, especially in their early days, but things have stabilized pretty well over time.

If you don't want any "crap", support projects like Neo900. You do have a choice.

about a month ago
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Researcher Finds Hidden Data-Dumping Services In iOS

dos1 Re:DON'T PANIC (98 comments)

Android and Windows Phone aren't the only alternatives out there. There are even devices and OSes that are supported entirely by FLOSS community, like OpenPhoenux. There is a choice, you just have to keep your eyes wide open.

about a month ago
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Private Data On iOS Devices Not So Private After All

dos1 Re:it's the future (101 comments)

True words. Sadly, people consider things that are trendy or have more raw power as more valuable, even if they don't really need that. When someone actually comes up with the device that you can control (instead of it controlling you), all he hears is "meh, too slow", "too expensive", "no capacitive screen? are you joking?"

You would expect people to be more sensible than that, especially in the post-Snowden era.

about a month ago
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Researcher Finds Hidden Data-Dumping Services In iOS

dos1 Re:DON'T PANIC (98 comments)

>I want these services off my phone.

How can you say that and yet still buy such devices? It's not like one doesn't have a choice...

about a month ago
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Google Demos Modular Phone That (Almost) Actually Works

dos1 Re:Anyone else remember... (126 comments)

With enough skill you can replace broken parts in "non-modular" mobile phones as well. That's not the problem.

Try to upgrade CPU on your laptop, let's say from Sandy Bridge to Haswell. Then we can talk.

about 2 months ago
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Google Demos Modular Phone That (Almost) Actually Works

dos1 Re:Anyone else remember... (126 comments)

Exactly. Replacement can be even done in current mobile phones, that's not a big issue.

about 2 months ago
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Google Demos Modular Phone That (Almost) Actually Works

dos1 Re:Anyone else remember... (126 comments)

But it's still (almost) true. Of course such phones *can* be built, it's just a matter of money and time tossed on it. Problem is somewhere else - how do you plan to make such phones competitive at all. How do you want to provide high performance? Battery time? Low latencies? Low price? Size that will still fit in the pocket?

Mobile devices are evolving to be more integrated, not less. Modularity requires you to give up any integration - which makes things like high performance or long battery time hard to achieve. What's important - you cannot even simply sacrifice one of it, as odds are that it won't help much with others anyway - unless you sacrifice modularity of course.

Ara is just a R&D project. Maybe it will bring some useful knowledge that will be later integrated into real devices - but I don't think it will bring the oh-my-god-so-modular phone to the market. I'm more excited about projects like Neo900 - this is how "modularity" in mobile devices should be achieved. Plus the solution with two PCBs gives hope for even more "modularity" in future, with potential partial updates.

about 2 months ago
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Firefox OS 1.3 Arrives: Dual SIM Support, Continuous Autofocus, Graphics Boost

dos1 Re:Tired of crap "mobile" operating systems (68 comments)

Why not? I'm doing that on my Openmoko Neo Freerunner for past 6 years. Same on Nokia N900, OpenPhoenux GTA04 and soon Neo900.

If you choose to buy crippled, locked-down phones, then you're the only one to blame.

about 4 months ago
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Really, Why Are Smartphones Still Tied To Contracts?

dos1 Re:Seriously? (482 comments)

Looks like in USA it was the same like in Europe. We here also had simlocks, making the phone working only with carrier you bought it at. But so what? You always could just buy the phone outside the carriers. Most of people didn't - but that doesn't mean that they couldn't. Of course that would mean paying something like $399 instead of $1 plus two-year contract.

Now there are laws that require carriers to remove simlock after contract expires and most of operators don't even install the simlocks anymore. But that doesn't matter for me. What matters is the mere ability, and knowing that some CDMA carriers in US aren't even using SIMs and just sell preactivated phones instead, I was afraid that some of this lunacy is also present with GSM carriers when I was reading comments like "maybe in Europe, but in US it's not possible".

But it seems like it's just people not aware of their own market, but behaving like they actually are - and that's the thing I don't care about. If you want to be conscious customer, you do your research before buying anything, so it's your fault if you don't know that you don't have to buy your new phone locked by the carrier :)

about 4 months ago
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Canonical (Nearly) Halts Development of Ubuntu For Android

dos1 Re:Why (55 comments)

Android is free software as well, so what? Its application in real life generally is not, and judging from how well Firefox OS is able to overcome it (hint: it isn't), Ubuntu for phones will probably just follow the same path.

"Enjoy our awesome free system, but if device manufacturer locked down the bootloader and made access to root account troublesome, then it's not our fault, but manufacturers!"

Fortunately projects like OpenPhoenux exist, Neo900 will be available in few months. Both Firefox OS and Ubuntu for phones should work on it, as well as many other distros, including standard PC ones (making Debian usable as a phone is a matter of few apt-get installs and some basic configuration); without any proprietary drivers sans GPU acceleration (but looking at Replicant 4.2 running smoothly on GTA04 without 3D acceleration, I guess you can live without it if you really care about "software purity").

While Mozilla and Canonical might be doing some good job in software development, I simply don't care about their efforts in building hardware ecosystem, as they're even not trying to hide that they're doing it exactly the same like Android one, and that's unacceptable for me.

about 4 months ago
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Really, Why Are Smartphones Still Tied To Contracts?

dos1 Re:Seriously? (482 comments)

I don't know about Verizon, but people on Neo900's "compatible carriers" forum thread came into conclusion that there shouldn't be any problem with Neo900 compatibility on AT&T network, citing AT&T itself: http://www.att.com/shop/wirele...

So is AT&T lying on this page? You know, I'm one of the people working on Neo900, so I'd be grateful for some proof in case it's true, so we can properly warn our users :P

about 4 months ago

Submissions

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Neo900 reaches its fundraiser goal in less than week, now heading for 100k EUR

dos1 dos1 writes  |  about 10 months ago

dos1 (2950945) writes "The OpenPhoenux Neo900 project, which wants to create open successor to the Nokia N900 has reached its fundraiser goal of 25 000 € in less than week.

However, it's not over. The project has decided to continue the campaign, as they need as many "preorders" as possible in order to lower the price of the device (by producing more than just 200) and make production of some custom parts more feasible. Therefore their next goal is set to 100 000 €."

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