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Adding disks to RAID 10 array

drakaan Because it's dangerous and breaks redundancy. (1 comments)

If you were talking about a spanned volume, I'd understand why you might be frustrated. With RAID, there's a physical relationship between the organization of the blocks of data, and the number and configuration of disks in the set.

If you have 4 disks in a stripe set, then the first 4 blocks of data go to each drive in sequence. The next 4 blocks do the same. Once you're on the billionth block, and you run out of space, you can't just add a new drive into the mix without having to rearrange all but the first 4 blocks.

For RAID levels that include mirroring, doing what you want would be technically possible.

It's certainly possible that someone could write code in the RAID firmware or software to take the mirrored drives out of the array, build a new array using them and 1 of 2 newly-added drives, copy the data from the original stripe set to the new larger one, switch to the new stripe set as the active one, add the second of the 2 newly-added drives to the old stripe set, and rebuild the updated original stripe set via mirroring, but there are more than a few potential disasters waiting to happen in that scenario.

While it might be technically possible to come up with a way to tack a disk on to a RAID 10 array, it would not be safe, and safety is one of the things that the letter R in RAID brings to the table (redundancy). If the process of adding the disks breaks redundancy (which it would have to, while it was happening), then that would be something that most folks would not be looking for as an option.

about a week ago
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Windows 10: Can Microsoft Get It Right This Time?

drakaan Re:There's nothing wrong now... (489 comments)

If you're saying Windows XP was a decent OS because the UI was consistent, then you will never understand why I'm saying that Windows XP was horrible. It was a kludgy, buggy, security-hole-riddled skinned refresh of Windows 2000 (most of those changes they thankfully left out of Windows Server 2003).

Windows Vista was a decent comeback with it's own personality problems, and Windows 7 fixed most of the perceived issues. Windows 8/8.1 has metro/modern silliness, but it works very well, is less crash-prone than Win7, which was less crash-prone than Win2K (no need to mention windows XP in that list), and has pretty good performance, as well.

Your points about how XP was a good OS are points I find generally unimportant to the way in which I judge operating systems, although I understand why they might be important to you.

about two weeks ago
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Windows 10: Can Microsoft Get It Right This Time?

drakaan Re:There's nothing wrong now... (489 comments)

The UI and being used to it or not is something that time can change. The suckiness of certain aspects of how the OS works (or doesn't) day in and day out is what I'm talking about when I say win2k was nice, win 7 better, and win 8.1 an improvement on that (with winxp being the biggest dud of those 4). Vista wasn't even all that bad, except for some mistakes MS made related to UAC. I spent 6 months thinking about whether to build a new PC with win7 or win8, and decided on win8. Kids didn't have trouble. I didn't have trouble. Wife didn't have trouble. Upgraded the in-laws and they even get along fine with win8. If the UI differences bug you enough for it to be a deal-breaker, then I can understand your disagreement, but they give me no trouble at all.

about two weeks ago
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Windows 10: Can Microsoft Get It Right This Time?

drakaan There's nothing wrong now... (489 comments)

Windows 8.1 isn't in need of being fixed, really. It's better than Windows 7, which was better than Windows 2000 (windows XP was a heaping pile of dung).

about two weeks ago
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DuinoKit Helps Teach Students About Electronics (Video)

drakaan Re:No... (61 comments)

Radio shack still sells stuff like this, apparently (at least they do online).

about three weeks ago
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Microsoft's New Windows Monetization Methods Could Mean 'Subscriptions'

drakaan Re:I'm sorry (415 comments)

Exactly! And don't forget how expensive the cinnamon and flavored syrups are, too!

about 1 month ago
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Microsoft's New Windows Monetization Methods Could Mean 'Subscriptions'

drakaan Re:I'm sorry (415 comments)

They don't pay $4.00 for a cup of coffee. They *do* pay $4.00 for coffee-flavored steamed milk and other drinks with varying proportions of milk and coffee. Milk is expensive. Duh.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Aging and Orphan Open Source Projects?

drakaan Re:Depends on the project (155 comments)

Yes, I know. I was guessing that he didn't know the difference.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Aging and Orphan Open Source Projects?

drakaan Re:Depends on the project (155 comments)

Why would you want to write a replacement product and support the old software too?

about 3 months ago
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Lots Of People Really Want Slideout-Keyboard Phones: Where Are They?

drakaan Re:MyTouch 4G Slidw (544 comments)

I gave in and went without a slider once I realized they were never going to come out with a narrow (portrait-oriented) slider. I want an approximately blackberry-curve-shaped keyboard that slides out at the bottom of my phone, rather than the landscape-oriented one that made me choose an original droid over a blackberry storm (well, that and the fact that the onscreen keyboard on the storm was complete shit compared to the moto droid's).

I still really want one, but they won't make it.

about 6 months ago
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Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

drakaan Re:It's already going on... (353 comments)

I tend to agree with you. I'm not ignorant about my driving. That's the *reason* that I'm a conservative driver.

I've been a driver for 24 years. In that time, vehicles I own have been involved in 5 collisions. In two of those, the vehicles were parked and struck by other motorists. In one, the vehicle was stationary, but not parked, and struck by another motorist, in one, I backed into a car that was going around 25 mph through a gas station parking lot (lesson learned), and in one, I clipped some poor guy's '63 skylark with a humvee when doing a courier run at the very end of a 24-hour CQ shift (I still feel like a jackass about that one...I'd swear I looked right and things were clear, but I was obviously wrong).

Aside from that, I've had one claim arising from a hailstorm that beat the crap out of the family minivan.

I was not giving some list of things I do that make me perfect, because I'm not perfect. What I am is cautious, mainly because I'm not made of money, and deductibles are not my friend. I don't drive strictly the speed limit, but I always follow at a safe distance for the road conditions, and I pay attention to folks behind me who don't do the same. I let faster drivers pass me and move over to make that easier when possible. I signal lane changes and turns. I change lanes before the last minute so that I don't have to worry about cutting someone off.

I do all of those things for a couple of reasons. First, I don't want to be the cause of an accident and cause damage to myself, someone else, my car, or someone else's car because it sucks for everyone when that happens. Second, I don't want to pay any more money than I have to for the privilege of driving.

about 7 months ago
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Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

drakaan Re:It's already going on... (353 comments)

Damn it. Usually, I get to play the pedant.

about 7 months ago
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Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

drakaan Re:It's already going on... (353 comments)

Actually, as someone who is a pretty conservative driver, I welcomed the option to let worse drivers subsidize my premiums in exchange for them tracking my driving for a while. I could care less that they know (for example) that I always signal turns and lane changes and don't aggressively accelerate or stop. I could also care less that people who can't demonstrate the same behavior are seen as a higher risk and charged a higher premium.

...except you, of course, since you're on my \. frinds list and all...

about 7 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Way to Learn C# For Game Programming?

drakaan Re:It's too slow. (254 comments)

Mod. Parent. Up.

about 7 months ago
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U.S. Democrats Propose Legislation To Ban Internet Fast Lanes

drakaan Re:Just do SOMETHING (190 comments)

No, the problem is that the judicial branch told the FCC that *until* they classify ISPs as common carriers, they don't have the authority to mandate anything with regards to paid prioritization or de-prioritization.

With Mr. Wheeler in charge, there doesn't seem to be much impetus to reclassify the ISPs in that way.

I am an independent who often votes republican, and I believe that the republican bill as currently laid out is a bad plan. Internet service is a utility in the 21st century, and should be treated that way.

about 7 months ago
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Century-Old Drug Reverses Signs of Autism In Mice

drakaan Re:Well, so much for slashdot (207 comments)

I was unaware that she was vast...let alone trying not to be.

about 7 months ago
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The FBI's Jargon List: Internet Acronyms Galore

drakaan Re:Urban Dictionary (124 comments)

Not for nothin', but 4 or 5 decades ago was the 60's or 70's...9 or 10 decades ago, maybe?

about 7 months ago
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Google: Indie Musicians Must Join Streaming Service Or Be Removed

drakaan Re:Ummm (364 comments)

This isn't evil, it's stupid. Indie artists are only using YouTube so that they can share videos and make some minor revenue if they're lucky. If YouTube makes the terms of that arrangement unattractive, then they will see indie artists leave for video hosting services that are more indie-friendly.

The folks at Vimeo are probably ecstatic.

about 7 months ago

Submissions

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So long jumpcut...I'll miss ya

drakaan drakaan writes  |  more than 5 years ago

drakaan (688386) writes "If you ever used jumpcut, it's time to grab any edits you posted and save them to your home machine. Recently, Yahoo! sent out the following email message:

Dear Jumpcut user,

After careful consideration, we will be officially closing the Jumpcut.com site on June 15, 2009. This was a difficult decision to make, but it's part of the ongoing prioritization efforts at Yahoo!

We have released a software utility that allows you to download the movies you created on Jumpcut to your computer. As well, you can now download your original assets. Please visit the download page at http://www.jumpcut.com/myhome/?subnav=download to get started.

Once you download your movies, you may choose to upload them to another site such as Flickr, which allows video uploads for short videos (90 seconds or less). You can find out more here: http://flickr.com/explore/video

Thanks for being a part of Jumpcut.

The Jumpcut Team

Sad news...jumpcut was a lot of fun. On the other hand, they *finally* put together a way to easily download the videos...maybe if they'd done that a year ago, this would be a different article..."

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Microsoft's Open-Source Trap for Mono

drakaan drakaan writes  |  more than 7 years ago

drakaan (688386) writes "Yes, Microsoft has pledged to "open up" the source code to the .Net framework libraries. Therein lies a potential problem...

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols writes:

...Let's say a year from now, Microsoft does a SCO. They claim that Mono contains code that was stolen from the .NET Framework reference source code. They point at their code, they point at the license, and sure enough, there's similar code. After all, both projects are implementing .NET; there will almost certainly be lines of code that looks alike...
"

Link to Original Source

Journals

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Damn, but I miss Groklaw.

drakaan drakaan writes  |  about a year ago

Seriously. Like, "there's an emptiness and it gnaws at me" kind of missing it.

I know why PJ went off the grid, and I respect her concerns, but it still sucks. In the meantime, anyone who feels the same can pay a visit Here, where some folks that used to frequent Groklaw are trying to re-establish a community that cares enough about the same things to keep them visible and discussed.

You should all drop by sometime.

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CSS3, IE8, and things that take too long...

drakaan drakaan writes  |  more than 5 years ago

...so, I was grumbling to myself about IE not supporting certain CSS3 capabilities (selectors, box-shadows, text-shadows, etc), when I decided to go ahead and write a letter on the IE8 blog site:

Hi there.

I'm a web app developer and long-time [x]html/css hacker, and I'm curious about the timeline for IE8 supporting at least *some* of the useful new stuff in the CSS3 spec.

find it immensely aggravating that I can easily do rounded corners, drop-shadows, custom checkboxes/radio buttons, and opacity in Firefox, Safari, etc (but not in IE) using nothing more than CSS3-compliant stylesheets.

I always keep graceful degradation in mind when coding, but that doesn't mean I *want* pages to be either ugly in IE or uneccesarily complicated and verbose just because of browser compatibility issues.

When will I be able to rely on IE supporting CSS3 fully? It would help a lot in terms of lowering bandwidth, and simplifying development while ensuring a cross-browser experience that doesn't leave IE users with a dumbed-down view of a web app.

Shortly thereafter, I got a note back from Eric Lawrence on the subject:

The final version of IE8 was completed in March; in general, it does not (and thus will not) support CSS 3.

Planning for the next version of IE has started, and we have a large number of requests for support of various CSS3 modules.

-Eric

I'm fine with that, but it misses the crux of my question (namely "when will IE be doing the stuff that other browsers have been doing for a year or more with CSS3?"), so I asked another question:

Thanks, Eric...

Does that mean that the next version of IE will support *some* CSS modules when it ships, or that it will support the CSS3 spec in its entirety?

When will we see some blogging on the subject?

...and got a reply...

It's important to note that thus far, only 5 of the CSS3 modules have reached Candidate Recommendation stage: http://www.css3.info/modules/. Some modules are still in working draft stage, and it appears that at least one isn't even at Draft stage yet.

We will discuss our IE9 plans as they solidify. At this point, we're primarily listening to feedback from developers.

Thanks for identifying some of your top requests.

-Eric

I get it. I do, really. I *know* that CSS3 is unfinished. What I *don't* get is why 8 years after the initial working draft, the spec isn't close to being finalized, and why the parts that are simple or relatively stable have not been implemented by all browser vendors.

I make web-based applications for a living. I use a variety of tricks to make them more attractive, and I prefer omitting eye-candy or specific layout details to adding ugly CSS hacks, javascript workarounds, or conditional code just because some browser vendors are more willing than others to provide preemptive support for future standards.

I'm not sure what the primary issue is...politics, money, over-cautiousness...all I know is that the situation makes it harder than it needs to be for me to create simple things that just work in all browsers (a newspaper-style multi-column layout...a drop-shadow on a box or text...alternate images for checkboxes or radio buttons...text displayed at a 45-degree angle).

But hey, what do I know...I'm not coding browsers or part of the CSS working group.

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