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Comments

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Climate Damage 'Irreversible' According Leaked Climate Report

dtjohnson Re:What? (428 comments)

Yes, in the beginning there was carbon and water. Then, the water was split into hydrogen and oxygen which oxidized the carbon into carbon dioxide and left a lot of hydrogen gas drifting around. Then life spontaneously arose and converted the carbon dioxide into hydrocarbons aka "stored sunlight." Then more new life spontaneously arose which could metabolize the stored sunlight (aka food) into carbon dioxide and now here we are busily turning/burning the stored sunlight back into carbon dioxide. Now, all we need to do is to stop everyone from burning the stored sunlight and we will all live happily ever after on our beautiful planet while happily skipping naked hand in hand with naked females through meadows filled with daisies and dandelions. [editor: please add the above to the IPCC report to the world leaders]

yesterday
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Climate Damage 'Irreversible' According Leaked Climate Report

dtjohnson It's IPCC...not IPPC (428 comments)

At least get the acronym for the name of the organization predicting doom right. And...there's no hurry for action. The climate is currently taking a 'hiatus' from warming due to the alleged storage of heat in the deep ocean. Forecasts for the upcoming winter are...cold.

yesterday
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Statistics Losing Ground To CS, Losing Image Among Students

dtjohnson Difficult to determine what TFA is about (105 comments)

Is this very poorly written article about: 1) students not choosing to pursue a career path in computer science rather than statistics... or... 2) CS people doing poor-quality statistics work... or... 3)banning the Advanced Placement "Statistics" class because students are relying too much on their "pocket calculators." We get three-articles-in-one to talk about here. At least they are all loosely related to something called "statistics."

yesterday
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Cause of Global Warming 'Hiatus' Found Deep In the Atlantic

dtjohnson Admission that the "Hiatus" exists... (436 comments)

Here is an implicit admission that there is such a thing as a "hiatus" from the predicted increase in global temperature. Most of the recent stories have suggested that the planet was past the point of no return, that the antarctic ice cap was doomed, that the arctic would soon, be ice free, that sea levels were on the verge of dramatic increase, that drought caused by planetary warming was accelerating, and so forth. The entire idea of human-caused global warming is based on information we have that the the atmospheric concentration of co2 is increasing and computer models which suggest that this increase in co2 concentration would lead to an increase in global temperatures due to heat being prevented from radiating back into space. But...what if the computer models are...dare we say it...wrong? What if the earth's albedo changes due to changes in atmospheric water vapor and condensed water (clouds) that are not modeled? What if the solar output changes leading to planetary heating and cooling cycles stretching over centuries? What if the amount of heat radiation into space that is being blocked by carbon dioxide is far less than predicted by the modeling due to kinetic gas mixing and reradiation? What if the amount of heat originating from the center of the earth is varying more than we expect and affecting our surface climate? If our crude computer models attributing climate change solely to simplistic effects of carbon dioxide heat absorption are...wrong, one result would be that planetary surface temperatures might not actually increase as the models have predicted. Now, though, the co2/AGW proponents are attributing exactly this effect to an increase in subsurface ocean temperatures. However, there is obviously no long-term data on these temperatures making any such prediction fanciful at best. To put this into perspective, if all of the solar radiation striking the earth in a one-year period were to be absorbed by the earth's oceans and none of it were re-radiated into space, the temperature of the earth's ocean waters would increase by only about 0.2 C in that year. Now, consider that even AGW proponents will concede that 99.99 percent of that solar radiation is re-radiated into space and the temperature variations in the deep ocean would be very small and lost in the 'noise' of the measurement precision and absence of historical data for comparison. TFA is nothing but interesting conjectural speculation based on very limited data and certainly not the definitive 'answer' suggested by the slashdot article title.

5 days ago
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TEPCO: Nearly All Nuclear Fuel Melted At Fukushima No. 3 Reactor

dtjohnson Idiot speaks: "So.. what?" (255 comments)

A large amount of radioactive material was released into the ocean where it will remain in the food chain for decades. Approximately 100,000 people are unable to return to their homes and a large area of land in a country where land is scarce and precious is uninhabitable. But...that's just the short term. Long term: Japan will have to deal with electric power shortages for years until their power generation can be rebuilt with new technology. Hundreds of billions of dollars will have to be spent over the next 20 years to decommission the mess at Fukushima and attempt to decontaminate the surrounding downwind land. All of this was avoidable...but happened because the resident village idiots were able to prevent realistic plans from being implemented for electric power generation at Fukushima. The Onagawa power station was closer to the earthquake epicenter and yet it survived undamaged thanks to a losing battle by the resident village idiots to ensure that it was built according to their idiot plans. They lost at Onagawa but 'won' at Fukushima. Idiots who said...why spend a lot of money on a bigger seawall at Fukushima? Idiot engineers at GE who said 'there's no need for a failsafe design for something that will never happen,' and idiots who say 'what's the big deal about a meltdown?'

about three weeks ago
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New Car Heads-Up Display To Be Controlled By Hand Gestures, Voice Commands

dtjohnson Shut up and drive... (142 comments)

Those cool features described in the TFA, like the HUD display for test messages, twitter, iTunes, etc. leads to something politely called 'distracted driving' and less politely called 'Being an Asshole' which last year killed 3,328 people and injured 421,000. As a long-time biker, I often see the drivers working their smartphone whilst swerving through traffic and chatting up their passengers and I've damn near become one of the 421,000 (or the 3,328) more than once. Rather than provide fancy new 'heads up' displays for drivers or built-in smart phone driver docking stations for drivers with their 'heads up' their ass, we should be working on roadside electronic surveillance and longer prison sentences for the drivers who kill people while using their smartphone.

about three weeks ago
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San Onofre Nuclear Power Plant Dismantling Will Cost $4.4 Billion, Take 20 Years

dtjohnson Re:No, it's killing the planet (343 comments)

"Every single one of those damnable windmills is slowing-down the air and making it more turbulent as a trade-off for spinning the generator..."

This is so dumb, it's actually funny. Those 'windmills' do not create or consume energy. They are an energy transfer device. The take an insignificant amount of energy (relative to the atmospheric total) out of the moving gases in the atmosphere and transfer it to another location. There, that energy is released as heat into the...(wait for it)...atmosphere where it contributes (in an insiginificant small way) to convective heating that drives more...wind.

about three weeks ago
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San Onofre Nuclear Power Plant Dismantling Will Cost $4.4 Billion, Take 20 Years

dtjohnson Nuclear power will be too cheap to meter... (343 comments)

...not. Advocates of nuclear power point to the relatively-low (compared with other fuel types) operating cost of nuclear power plants but tend to disregard the construction and dismantling costs. In this case, the dismantling cost is estimated at $4.4 billion and that's before dismantling has even started. Worse, still, though was the little nugget in the article stating that the spent nuclear fuel would be indefinitely stored on the site in steel cannisters until the federal government comes up with a long term solution. Yeah, I know what you're thinking...'so what's the big deal about a little spent nuclear fuel in a few steel cannisters?' Well, those will require long-term expensive oversight and security and, even with all of that, will likely eventually begin releasing contamination into the environment as vigilence is relaxed due to future financial constraints, corrosion, etc. That spent nuclear fuel remains dangerous far after we, our descendants, their descendants, and their descendants are alive...and that amount of time is probably beyond the limit of any earthly vigilance anyway. Don't buy into the 'nuclear power is cheap and environmentally-friendly' arguments. It's not either one of those...and never will be (fission-based power anyway). Better to have coal-fired power plants. Even better to have wind and solar power. Better still to just use less.

about three weeks ago
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Gaza's Only Power Plant Knocked Offline

dtjohnson Loss of electric power is hardship (868 comments)

Eliminating the only power plant will probably end electrical service for Gaza...and that will be hardship. No power means no pumps for water and sewage, no air conditioning or heat, no light, no electric cooking, no computers, no digital controls, etc. Electricity is a requirement for comfortable modern living. But...Hamas chose to launch not one, but hundreds, maybe thousands of missiles at Israel. The people in Gaza chose to accept the missiles or at least look the other way. Hamas was elected by the Gaza population to be their leaders...another choice. Launching missiles at someone is...war...and war is not comfortable, safe, clean, easy or without cost. When you go to war, people die and those left behind are going to be without comfort until the war ends. If Hamas was in Canada and chose to launch missiles at Boston, the United States would never rest until every last one of the missiles was eliminated, Hamas was destroyed, and a new more-friendly government had taken Hamas's place. As it is, Israel has been remarkably restrained. Yes, thousands of Gazans will likely die before the war is over. That is war. War kills. Gaza chose war. War has arrived. Be glad that there is no war whereever you are and never, never, never choose war.

about a month ago
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Microsoft's Nokia Plans Come Into Better Focus

dtjohnson The problem with Windows Phone... (149 comments)

...is that it doesn't bring anything new or better to the table and Microsoft is blind to that. It doesn't have a better user interface, better performance, more or better apps, or a significantly lower price. Microsoft wants to control the smart phone business just as it was able to control the desktop computer business...but it is too late to the party.

about a month ago
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The AI Boss That Deploys Hong Kong's Subway Engineers

dtjohnson Interesting...but not 'new' (162 comments)

The article was posted by someone who does not appear to have been around computers in industrial applications. Computers have been used for at least 4 decades for maintenance planning in large facilities as well as other areas such as transportation routing, product blending, production scheduling, etc. The maintenance activities for the London tube or the NYC subway are likely also being planned and scheduled using some sort of similar system even if the uptime result is not as good as Hong Kong.

about 1 month ago
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NASA Launching Satellite To Track Carbon

dtjohnson This is the dumbest project NASA has ever done (190 comments)

This is a project that would only make sense to people who have no understanding of 1) how large and detailed the planet's surface is, and 2) how numerous and complex the sources of carbon dioxide are. These are people who think of carbon dioxide as a 'pollutant' to be eliminated rather than as an essential molecule for all life on the planet. In the landscape of their thought processes, they likely imagine that they are searching for hidden smokestacks from coal-burning power plants. It is absolutely unbelievable that this project got funded and shows the depths to which some scientific inquiry has sunk.

about 2 months ago
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Russia Wants To Replace US Computer Chips With Local Processors

dtjohnson Probably this is for security reasons (340 comments)

Running Windows on Intel would perhaps give you a platform with numerous built-in 'backdoors' for helpyourselves access by americans. Like the chinese, the russians want to have their own backdoors and not someone elses.

about 2 months ago
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Teaching Creationism As Science Now Banned In Britain's Schools

dtjohnson Re:What exactly is 'creationism' anyway? (649 comments)

"To me, it means that there is no evolution, that man sprang fully formed and didn't come from a long evolution of different animals."

The Biblical sequence on creation is light => sky => earth => plants => stars => sun/moon => fishes => birds => animals => man => woman so humans were at the end of that process.

The current scientific understanding of creation is more like light => stars => earth => moon => prokaryotes => plants => fishes => mammals => man so humans are still at the end. Evolution, or natural selection, is an obvious phenomena that we observe around us every day of our lives, on everything from dog appearance to human hereditary conditions to software products. It is equally obvious (to me anyway, your opinion may differ) that the universe, our world, and all life was created by God. Science has yet to present any natural biological process that can account for the origin of the universe, the beginning of life on our planet, or the origin of the complex multicellular sexual beings that we are. Moreover, the existence of 'humans' dates back only a few tens of thousands of years...a tiny, even miniscule, amount of time on a planet with a 4 billion year history.

about 2 months ago
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Teaching Creationism As Science Now Banned In Britain's Schools

dtjohnson What exactly is 'creationism' anyway? (649 comments)

Most would say that 'creationism' is the belief that a divine entity created the universe. That is definitely not a minority opinion in the Catholic Church, the Church of England, or among Christians in general. All that anyone can say, based on our present knowledege, is that the universe had a finite beginning at a time in the distant past ...and arose (or was was 'created')...from nothing. Neither 'science' nor 'Christianity' nor 'creationism' can prove any sort of causality between the beginning of the universe and anything else. It is not doing students any favors to keep them in the dark about any of that. Certainly it is impossible to legitimately 'teach' students that there is any sort of scientific proof that a divine entity did NOT create the universe.

about 2 months ago
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Chinese Gov't Reveals Microsoft's Secret List of Android-Killer Patents

dtjohnson This shows how Microsoft 'competes' (140 comments)

If Microsoft made, licensed, or distributed a competitive mobile device, people would choose to buy it over iPhones or Android phones. However, they don't and people don't and so those great minds at Microsoft look at the situation and say 'we've got to knock off our competitors' rather than 'we've got to have a product that people prefer over our competitors.' If Microsoft can use it's patent acquisitions to force Google to pay big royalties, they can drive up the price of Android phones and make them less-attractive to buyers, who will then theoretically be more likely to look at Microsoft devices. That's one way to help buyers make the 'right' choice but it is not a very stellar example of a free-market economy in action. Microsoft would probably be more at home making smartphones on a captive basis for the Communist Chinese government, complete with built-in Bing filtering. Microsoft is an enormous wet blanket on technical innovation and moving technology forward and things will probably not improve until they are a shrunken shell of their present self...which will probably take another 10 or 15 years.

about 2 months ago
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Geothermal Heat Contributing To West Antarctic Ice Sheet Melting

dtjohnson Re:Geothermal heat isn't 'AGW-approved' (387 comments)

Okay, then take McMurdo Station. It's on the coastline. The average 'high' temperature there in January (the warmest month) is only 31.6F...still below freezing...and that's the high temperature for the warmest month. But, if we're talking about the antarctic continental ice sheet, the Amundsen-Scott temperatures are more representative than coastal temperatures which, like temps at all coastal locations worldwide, are moderated by the presence of the ocean as an enormous heat reservoir. There is not a lot of climate data available for most of Antarctica but your boneheaded presumption that a coastal temp is more representative of ice sheet air temperatures than an interior measurement is narrow-minded and demonstrates a desire to adjust the data to fit preconceived beliefs. A more scientific approach is to ask questions and then attempt to answer them with the best data available. Is the Antarctic ice sheet melting? Satellite data has suggested that it is. Why? Your 'warmer' preconceived answer to that question is 'the melting is caused by warmer antarctic air temps due to climate warming caused by carbon dioxide' and yet there is no data at all to support that while there is some data suggesting that geothermal heat input (see TFA) is having an effect.

about 3 months ago
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Geothermal Heat Contributing To West Antarctic Ice Sheet Melting

dtjohnson Geothermal heat isn't 'AGW-approved' (387 comments)

Just a few days ago, global warmers were suggesting that Antarctic ice losses were doubling due to global warming. Of course, the problem with that is that the warmest temperature recorded at Amundsen-Scott South pole station during the last 12 months was -21F in January, 2014 which is not exactly bikini weather and is still 53 degrees F lower than the temperature needed to melt water. Obviously, if antarctic ice is melting, it is due to volcanic or geothermal heat inputs rather than balmy surface temperatures brought about by too much carbon dioxide.

about 3 months ago
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Big Telecom: Terms Set For Sprint To Buy T-Mobile For $32B

dtjohnson Whatever happened to 'competition?' (158 comments)

I can see why this deal is good for Sprint (they grow in size at a cost way cheaper and easier than self-growth) and T-Mobile (they get a lot of money) but this is most definitely NOT good for cell phone customers. Reducing the number of competitors from 4 to 3 will just increase the market leverage of the surviving 3 providers which will result in their product offerings and service plans being less competitive for cell customers. Do they think we are idiots? Reduced competition is great for the bottom line but leaves customers with fewer choices and higher costs. Beyond a certain size (which all 4 companies are way past) there are no economies of scale that would result in lower costs for a merged company. There is only less competition that allows higher prices. So...cell phone companies...what's wrong with having 4 companies compete for my dollar instead of 3? Aren't you in favor of free-enterprise and capitalism? Or are you all becoming socialists?

about 3 months ago
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Microsoft Won't Bring Back the Start Menu Until 2015

dtjohnson Microsoft just does not get it... (516 comments)

There's nothing great about the 'start' button. When it first appeared in Windows 95, no one jumped up and down and shouted 'eureka!' It was just a way of providing users with a reference point for key functionality...starting apps, shutting down, seeing a short semi-custom menu of options, finding system stuff, and so on. I use a non-window os and there is no 'start' button and there never has been one...and no one misses it. Windows 3.1 and NT 3.1 did not have a 'start' button. The 'start' button is even a semi-retarded non-intuitive way of centralizing stuff. For example, as has often been pointed out over the years, clicking on 'start' to shutdown is not exactly the cleverest way of doing things. (My system has a button cleverly labelled 'shutdown.') But...but...but...the 'start' button was missed for just one reason...because windows users are used to it. So, when Microsoft takes it away and does not replace it with anything comparable, users complain. We would happily click on 'kill' or 'terminate' or 'stop' or 'don't do that anymore' or a frowny-face or whatever, as long as it was...the same. Putting the 'start' button back...in 2015...kind of misses this point. By that time, we users will be used to something else.

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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Antarctic Ice hits an all-time record high level

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  about 2 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes ""Two weeks after a new record was set in the Arctic Ocean for the least amount of sea ice coverage in the satellite record, the ice surrounding Antarctica reached its highest ever level. Sea ice extended over 19.44 million square kilometers (7.51 million square miles) in 2012, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The previous record of 19.39 million kilometers (7.49 million square miles) was set in 2006." Ice extent is reaching an all-time record high on the bottom of the planet just after ice reached an all-time record low on the top of the planet. What can it mean? Either there will soon be more ice at the top or less ice at the bottom or the planet will become seriously 'bottom heavy.' Now there is something to worry about..."
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Underground condos for sale in Kansas will be humanity's last holdout

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 2 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "A developer in Kansas is selling what can be called "Humanity's Last Holdout." He is converting abandoned Atlas missile silos into luxury condos that will allow the occupants to hunker down and withstand war, solar flares, catclysmic weather events, and just about any of your general apocalyptic events. A condo starts at $1 million for a half-floor unit and will include complex life support systems for water, power, and unmentionables. So far, brisk sales have totaled $7 million."
Link to Original Source
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Iran deleted from the world's banking computers

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 2 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "Iran is being deleted from the world banking system Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) computers as of Saturday at 1600 UTC. Once the SWIFT codes for Iranian banks are deleted, Iranian banks will no longer be able to transfer funds to and from other worldwide banks making Iranian international commerce into a barter operation. SWIFT is taking the action at the request of EU members to comply with international sanctions against Iran due to its program to develop nuclear weapons. The effect will be to drastically hinder Iran's ability to execute international business transactions. This is serious folks."
Link to Original Source
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Greenland ice cover loss claims said wrong

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 2 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "The new "Times Atlas of the World" claims in publicity for its newest edition that global warming has turned 15 percent of Greenland's former ice-covered land "green and ice-free." Now, however, scientists from the Scott Polar Research Institute say those figures, based on data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) are wrong. "Recent satellite images of Greenland make it clear that there are in fact still numerous glaciers and permanent ice cover where the new Times Atlas shows ice-free conditions and the emergence of new lands," they say in a letter that has been sent to the Times. Others have pointed out that if 15 percent of Greenland ice cover had been lost, then sea levels would have risen by 1 meter...which has not happened. Perhaps yet another climategate is brewing."
Link to Original Source
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Future Sun may disrupt spacecraft and satellites

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  about 3 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "A study published today predicts that solar storms are going to become increasingly disruptive to satellites and communications in the coming decades as the sun cycles towards a minimum of activity. "The work, published in Geophysical Research Letters, predicts that once the Sun shifts toward an era of lower solar activity, more hazardous radiation will reach Earth. The team says the Sun is currently at a grand solar maximum. This phase began in the 1920s — and has lasted throughout the space age....The evidence seems to indicate that although there are fewer solar storms once the Sun leaves its grand maximum, they are more powerful, faster and therefore carry more particles.""
Link to Original Source
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Thunderstorms produce large amounts of antimatter

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 3 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "Scientists have been looking for anti-matter deep in space but now it appears that there is a source much closer to home...thunderstorms. Scientists looking at terrestial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) produced in thunderstorms have discovered that the gamma ray energy transforms into a pair of particles...an electron and a positron...which then sprays out into space as an anti-matter beam. This happens as many as 500 times each day. Perhaps it will not be much longer until anti-matter is harnesses as a source of energy for interstellar warp drive."
Link to Original Source
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Solar hemisphere eruption shatters understandings

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 3 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes ""On August 1, 2010, an entire hemisphere of the sun erupted. Filaments of magnetism snapped and exploded, shock waves raced across the stellar surface, billion-ton clouds of hot gas billowed into space. Astronomers knew they had witnessed something big. It was so big, it may have shattered old ideas about solar activity."

Previously, solar scientists had considered solar activity to be localized and isolated but the August 1 eruption led to the insight that all localized activity (i.e. 'sunspots') were manifestations of much bigger interrelated solar magnetic activity lurking below the surface. This has implications for models of the Earth's climate which have modeled solar output as a relatively constant input to the Earth's climate varying only slightly on the 11-year sunspot cycle."

Link to Original Source
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One percent of human genes come from Neanderthals

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 4 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "A study published in Nature today establishes conclusively that living humans carry between 1 and 4 percent of their genes in common with Neanderthals. Previous studies failed to show intermixing between us and neanderthals. The new, much more rigorous study, was done by sequencing DNA from 3 neanderthal individuals who perished 40,000 years ago and comparing it with DNA from humans in Africa, France, Papua New Guinea, and China. The researchers concluded that humans living today carry between 1 and 4 percent of Neanderthal genes and the intermixing must have happened during a 50,000 year window when neanderthals and humans were living side-by-side in the Middle East. So, the next time you see a neanderthal image, keep in mind that it might be your Uncle Fester."
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Arctic Ice Extent Underestimated by bad sensor

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 5 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) has been at the forefront of predicting doom in the arctic as ice melts due to global warming. In May, 2008 they went so far as to predict that the North Pole would be ice-free during the 2008 'melt season' leading to a lively slashdot discussion. Today, however, they say that they have been the victims of 'sensor drift' that lead to an underestimation of arctic ice extent by as much as 500,000 square kilometers. The problem was discovered after they received emails from puzzled readers, asking why obviously sea-ice-covered regions were showing up as ice free open ocean. It turns out that the NSIDC relys on an older, less-reliable method of tracking sea ice extent called SSM/I that does not agree with a newer method called AMSR-E. So why doesn't NSIDC use the newer AMSR-E data? "We do not use AMSR-E data in our analysis because it is not consistent with our historical data." Turns out that the AMSR-E data only goes back to 2002 which is probably not long enough for the NSIDC to make sweeping conclusions about melting. The AMSR-E data is updated daily and is available to the public. Thus far, sea ice extent in 2009 is tracking ahead of 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008 so the predictions of an ice free north pole might be premature."
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RIAA litigation may be unconstitutional

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 5 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "A Harvard law school professor has submitted arguments on behalf of Joel Tenenbaum in RIAA v. Tenenbaum in which Professor Charles Neeson claims that the underlying law that the RIAA uses is actually a criminal, rather than civil, statute and is therefore unconstitutional. According to this article, "Neeson charges that the federal law is essentially a criminal statute in that it seeks to punish violators with minimum statutory penalties far in excess of actual damages. The market value of a song is 99 cents on iTunes; of seven songs, $6.93. Yet the statutory damages are a minimum of $750 per song, escalating to as much as $150,000 per song for infringement "committed willfully."" If the law is a criminal statute, Neeson then claims that it violates the 5th and 8th amendments and is therefore unconstitutional. Litigation will take a while but this may be the end for RIAA litigation, at least until they can persuade Congress to pass a new law."
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2008 is the coldest year of this century

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  about 6 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "Data from the United Kingdom Metereological Office suggests that 2008 will be an unusually cold year due to the La Nina effect in the western Pacific ocean. Not to worry, though, as the La Nina effect has faded recently so its effect on next years temperatures will be reduced. However, another natural cycle, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, is predicted to hold global temperatures steady for the next decade before global warming takes our planet into new warmth. If these predictions are correct, there must be a lot of planetary heat being stored away somewhere...unless the heat output from the sun is decreasing rather than increasing or the heat being absorbed by the earth is decreasing due to changes in the earth's albedo."
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Microsoft falls over the cliff

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 6 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "Microsft released their fiscal 3rd quarter earnings yesterday and they are a shocker. Sales of the Windows Client tumbled 24 percent from a year ago, sales of Microsoft Office were down 2 percent, but sales of Xbox360 gear were up 68 percent. Unfortunately for Microsoft, though, the 'Entertainment' Division is still just a break-even business and most of their profit comes from selling Windows and Office. Other interesting stuff: they repurchased $5 billion less stock in 3Q08 than 3Q07 and they are carrying $10 billion on their books now as 'goodwill' versus only $5 billion in the year ago period. Looks like all of those stories about problems with Windows Vista were...right. What should Microsoft do now to fix the mess? Rush out a new and improved Windows update or keep pushing on Vista?"
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Poll Topic

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 6 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "How much gas do you use to get to work? A) Zero. I roller-skate. B) Less than 1/4 gallon. Two wheels and a motor are all anyone should need. C) 1/4 to 1/2 gallon. My carpool complains about my gas. D) 1/2 to 1 gallon. My car sips gas like it's fine champagne. E) 1 to 2 gallons. My job and I are at opposite ends of a space-time paradox. F) More than 2 gallons. My carbon footprint looks like Sasquatch so I own stock in Exxon Mobil."
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New infrared treatment for Alzheimer patients

dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 6 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "A new treatment is being tested for people with Alzheimer's disease in which the brain is bathed with infra-red radiation to stimulate the growth of brain cells. Tests in mice have been very promising at improving the learning ability of the mice. In tests with people, 8 out of 9 have showed improvement. The treatment requires that an infra-red emitting helmet be worn for 10 minutes a day. From the article: "Currently all you can do with dementia is to slow down the rate of decay — this new process will not only stop that rate of decay but partially reverse it." It's estimated by the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health that the incidence of Alzheimer's will increase from the current 1 in 200 people to 1 out of 85 people worldwide by 2050 so any new potential treatment is welcome news."
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dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 7 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "Google has just gone live with their new javascript requirement. Now, you can no longer access stuff like groups or images from the Google front page without having javascript turned on. Given the security weaknesses of javascript, many turn it off or use plugins like noscript to block untrustworthy sites. Google was in trouble not long ago for their search logging. Now, you'll have to let Google in through your javascript door if you want to use their stuff. What will they do with that?"
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dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 7 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "Semiconductor Insights has selected the 65nm AMD X2 manufacturing process for their 'Most Innovative Process Technology' award for 2006. Says their press squib: ""Our analysis of the device has confirmed that the 65nm AMD Athlon(TM) 64 X2 dual-core desktop processors produced at AMD's Fab 36, use minimum gate lengths of 35nm, nine copper and one aluminum metal levels, strained silicon channel and a Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) substrate," stated Don Scansen, SI's lead process analyst. "Put altogether, it is an impressive technology package""
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dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 7 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "In a study of 364 men by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, those who used cell phones heavily were found to have fewer sperm that were less healthy than men who abstained from cell phones. Men who logged 4 hours per day with their cell phone had average sperm counts of 50 million per ml and the least healthy sperm while men who did not use a cell phone had sperm counts of 86 million per ml and their sperm was of superior quality. Maybe the cell phone damages sperm or maybe any man who would spend 4 hours a day chatting on a cell phone just doesn't have very good sperm to begin with, compared with the strong, silent types. More studies are needed..."
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dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 7 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "The Inquirer writes about a script to install the latest version on Internet Explorer on Linux distributions using WINE. The program achieves "the feat of running several Internet Explorer versions side by side -something not possible on windows without some hacking of the Microsoft provided installers" and also manages to isolate IE from the WINE installation. It even downloads and installs the ActiveX version of the Flash 9 player for IE and installs it at the end of its process. While it's always good to see more software options, is running IE a good thing or is it a new no-security 'window' for the world to leap through...on Linux? Even worse, could this make people less likely to use IE alternatives like Firefox?"
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dtjohnson dtjohnson writes  |  more than 7 years ago

dtjohnson (102237) writes "Princeton University has published a paper and video describing the results of their testing of a Diebold touchscreen voting machine that is used at thousands of locations in the United States. Princeton found that malicious vote stealing software could be installed in a machine in less than one minute that would miscount the votes and then delete itself when the 'election' was ended, leaving no trace that it ever existed. In their hypothetical election, George Washington loses to Benedict Arnold in the final vote tally even though George Washington received more 'touchscreen' votes. It's amazing that these kinds of machines are still allowed to be used. The short flash video at the bottom of the page does an exceptionally good job of illustrating the problem. Your local elected officials need to see it."

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