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Comments

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Ask Slashdot: What To Do When Another Dev Steals Your Work and Adds Their Name?

duguk Re:Do you have documents from the original work? (480 comments)

This is certainly the best solution.

Not only that, but you should be able to demonstrate you could write the code, and explain that this was a while ago and has gone through many revisions.

This has happened to me on many occasions doing contract work - and has never been an issue. My name is not always publicly displayed on my code.

If your new potential employer refuses to understand that, then the trust between you and your new employer has already broken down - I would recommend not working for them.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do When Another Dev Steals Your Work and Adds Their Name?

duguk Re:Turn a negative into a positive (480 comments)

This and absolutely this. If you have explained that you've worked on behalf of another company and that they have changed the author, and they don't believe you - then the trust has already broken down with your new potential employer. Cut your losses with the new employer, but keep the work on record - and in future explain the work you've done rather than relying on your name being in the code. If your new employer doesn't believe you now, and don't understand that this happens - why would you want to work for them? From many years of contract experience, I've found this to be the best solution.

about a year ago
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Portal Now Available On Linux

duguk Re:So Jealous! (115 comments)

I have, and I still do. If you think I'm lying, try it yourself; anonymous coward.

about a year ago
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Portal Now Available On Linux

duguk Re:So Jealous! (115 comments)

This was a few years ago now, and was an AMD Athlon 64, so I was getting less than my screen refresh rate under Windows XP. Not all of us run gaming hardware!

about a year ago
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Portal Now Available On Linux

duguk Re:So Jealous! (115 comments)

Thanks :) Going by the other replies, it seems like I already have...

about a year ago
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Portal Now Available On Linux

duguk Re:So Jealous! (115 comments)

It runs better under Linux, i.e. at a higher framerate. Sorry for not clarifying that.

about a year ago
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Portal Now Available On Linux

duguk Re:So Jealous! (115 comments)

The thing I found weird about this, is I've been running Portal in Wine for ages, and it seems to run better than it does under Windows!

about a year ago
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Should Microsoft Switch To WebKit?

duguk Re:It's a silly proposition (244 comments)

...and Webkit has a terrible rendering engine. Sounds like an appropriate combination.

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Tips For Designing a Modern Web Application?

duguk Re:Nothing wrong with PHP. Don't be a language big (409 comments)

Second time I've seen that link in this same article. I am absolutely sick of seeing it - there's a *few* errors in it. For example:

Operators are very fragile in the parser; foo()[0] and foo()->method() are both syntax errors. The former is allegedly fixed in PHP 5.4, but I can’t find mention of a fix for the latter.

The latter doesn't need a fix because it always worked. Honestly, how hard is it to test that foo()->method() works?

Objects compare as greater than anything else except other objects, which they are neither less than nor greater than.

Strict-equals on objects compares the references; but regular equals compares the contents of the objects. Two objects compare equal if the contain exactly the same fields and values. Seems pretty reasonable to me.

  • is always addition, and . is always concatenation.

This is a good thing; JavaScript gets this wrong.

There is no way to declare a variable. Variables that don’t exist are created with a null value when first used.

Variables that don't exist issue a notice. You can deal with that just like any other error.

Global variables need a global declaration before they can be used.

Actually there is also the $GLOBALS array for this. I'll agree that's not much a solution. Globals should just not be used; if you want to use static class variables, it's a much better choice with a sane syntax.

there’s no pass-by-object identity like in Python.

I'm not sure if I understand this but all objects are passed-by-reference in PHP (since 5) and PHP references act appropriately when used as function parameters, etc.

A reference can be taken to a key that doesn’t exist within an undefined variable (which becomes an array). Using a non-existent array normally issues a notice, but this does not.

An attempt to use the reference will result in a notice but isset() and empty() operate it on it correctly.

Constants are defined by a function call taking a string; before that, they don’t exist.

You can declare constants in classes and namespaces with the const keyword.

There’s an (array) operator for casting to array. Given that PHP has no other structure type, I don’t know why this exists.

You can cast scalars to single element arrays and objects to arrays with the same structure. Both are actually very useful.

include() and friends are basically C’s #include: they dump another source file into yours. There is no module system, even for PHP code.

PHP is interpreted -- namespaces and autoloaders are PHP's module system.

Appending to an array is done with $foo[] = $bar

This is a good thing.

empty($var) is so extremely not-a-function that anything but a variable,

Empty is equivalent to the not operator but will also work on undefined variables -- that's why it requires a variable.

There’s redundant syntax for blocks: if (...): ... endif;, etc.

Useful inside of templates where matching { } is much more difficult.

PHP’s one unique operator is @ (actually borrowed from DOS), which silences errors.

Sometimes you don't care if a function succeeds; like with the unlink() function which will raise an error if the file you're trying to delete doesn't exist.

PHP errors don’t provide stack traces.

Not true. Debug_backtrace() will give you a stack trace in an error handler.

Most error handling is in the form of printing a line to a server log nobody reads and carrying on.

Assuming, of course, the programmer doesn't do anything to handle errors.

E_STRICT is a thing, but it doesn’t seem to actually prevent much and there’s no documentation on what it actually does.

E_STRICT (or lack of it) is for compatibility with PHP4. When enabled it will "warn you about code usage which is deprecated or which may not be future-proof." -- quote from the manual.

E_ALL includes all error categories—except E_STRICT.

Unfortunate naming here -- E_ALL is from PHP4 and prior and E_STRICT is all about PHP5. Including it in E_ALL would break PHP4 scripts running on PHP5.

Weirdly inconsistent about what’s allowed and what isn’t.

This author is confused why syntax errors would be parse errors but logic errors are not.

PHP errors and PHP exceptions are completely different beasts. They don’t seem to interact at all.

This is sort of true; PHP errors and exceptions exist in different universes but it's easy to unify them and PHP even provides a built-in exception ErrorException to do so. You can turn every PHP error into an exception with 4 lines of code complete with stack traces. You could even turn exceptions into errors but I wouldn't recommend that. PHP supports both procedural and OO programming styles -- this is not a bad thing.

There is no finally construct

C++ also doesn't have a finally construct. But C++ and PHP support RAII -- class destructors run when the stack is unwound so you can do your cleanup. Finally would be a welcome addition to both languages.

function foo() { return new __stdClass(); } leaks memory. The garbage collector can only collect garbage that has a name.

PHP is reference counted with a cycle-detecting GC. That would not leak memory.

Function arguments can have “type hints”, which are basically just static typing. But you can’t require that an argument be an int or string or object or other “core” type

This is true, but it's an ongoing discussion on how to correctly handle scalar type hints. For all the discussion about how PHP isn't designed the author takes issue with the thing they're taking their time on.

Closures require explicitly naming every variable to be closed-over. Why can’t the interpreter figure this out?

Because of the dynamic abilities of PHP, there is simply no way for the interpreter to ever figure out the variable to close over. The solution is actually a rather simple.

clone is an operator?!

Of course!

Object attributes are $obj->foo, but class attributes are $obj::foo. I’m not aware of another language that does this or how it’s useful.

C++ does it. $obj::foo doesn't make any sense, if you're accessing class attributes then you use the class name Class::foo.

Also, an instance method can still be called statically (Class::method()). If done so from another method, this is treated like a regular method call on the current $this. I think.

Only static methods can be called statically. The other calling methods statically is similar to C++ ... you can call parent class methods explicitly by name by-passing any overriding.

new, private, public, protected, static, etc. Trying to win over Java developers? I’m aware this is more personal taste, but I don’t know why this stuff is necessary in a dynamic language

This is personal taste not a valid critique.

Subclasses cannot override private methods.

That is the definition of private methods!

There is no method you can call on a class to allocate memory and create an object.

You can use reflection to create an object without calling the constructor.

Static variables inside instance methods are global; they share the same value across all instances of the class

This is the definition of a static property!

Yet a massive portion of the standard library is still very thin wrappers around C APIs

That is, in fact, the point. PHP is supposed to be a thin scripting language layer over C. It's expanded beyond that. Many of the poor naming conventions are not because of PHP but rather are the exact API of the underlying C library.

Warts like mysql_real_escape_string, even though it has the same arguments as the broken mysql_escape_string, just because it’s part of the MySQL C API.

Both the C API and PHP have both these functions for backwards compatibility reasons. This entire API is pretty much depreciated with both the mysqli library and PDO replacing it.

Using multiple MySQL connections apparently requires passing a connection handle on every function call.

Yes, exactly. That's the only way multiple connections could possibly work.

PHP basically runs as CGI. Every time a page is hit, PHP recompiles the whole thing before executing it.

Unless you use a free code cache like APC. It will eventually be built in. Most people don't need it.

For quite a long time, PHP errors went to the client by default

If you don't handle your errors, they go somewhere.

Missing features

Most of these are provided by frameworks just as they are in Python, Ruby, C#, etc.

Insecure-by-default

Most of these things are now removed from the language after being depreciated for years.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Tips For Designing a Modern Web Application?

duguk Re:Even more important (409 comments)

I too could spend the time writing several paragraphs explaining in detail why this article is incorrect and the misunderstandings and misapprehensions the author is under. I'm fed up of seeing this propaganda going unargued.

Thankfully, someone has already detailed this for me:

Just a few errrors in the article:

Operators are very fragile in the parser; foo()[0] and foo()->method() are both syntax errors. The former is allegedly fixed in PHP 5.4, but I can’t find mention of a fix for the latter.

The latter doesn't need a fix because it always worked. Honestly, how hard is it to test that foo()->method() works?

Objects compare as greater than anything else except other objects, which they are neither less than nor greater than.

Strict-equals on objects compares the references; but regular equals compares the contents of the objects. Two objects compare equal if the contain exactly the same fields and values. Seems pretty reasonable to me.

  • is always addition, and . is always concatenation.

This is a good thing; JavaScript gets this wrong.

There is no way to declare a variable. Variables that don’t exist are created with a null value when first used.

Variables that don't exist issue a notice. You can deal with that just like any other error.

Global variables need a global declaration before they can be used.

Actually there is also the $GLOBALS array for this. I'll agree that's not much a solution. Globals should just not be used; if you want to use static class variables, it's a much better choice with a sane syntax.

there’s no pass-by-object identity like in Python.

I'm not sure if I understand this but all objects are passed-by-reference in PHP (since 5) and PHP references act appropriately when used as function parameters, etc.

A reference can be taken to a key that doesn’t exist within an undefined variable (which becomes an array). Using a non-existent array normally issues a notice, but this does not.

An attempt to use the reference will result in a notice but isset() and empty() operate it on it correctly.

Constants are defined by a function call taking a string; before that, they don’t exist.

You can declare constants in classes and namespaces with the const keyword.

There’s an (array) operator for casting to array. Given that PHP has no other structure type, I don’t know why this exists.

You can cast scalars to single element arrays and objects to arrays with the same structure. Both are actually very useful.

include() and friends are basically C’s #include: they dump another source file into yours. There is no module system, even for PHP code.

PHP is interpreted -- namespaces and autoloaders are PHP's module system.

Appending to an array is done with $foo[] = $bar

This is a good thing.

empty($var) is so extremely not-a-function that anything but a variable,

Empty is equivalent to the not operator but will also work on undefined variables -- that's why it requires a variable.

There’s redundant syntax for blocks: if (...): ... endif;, etc.

Useful inside of templates where matching { } is much more difficult.

PHP’s one unique operator is @ (actually borrowed from DOS), which silences errors.

Sometimes you don't care if a function succeeds; like with the unlink() function which will raise an error if the file you're trying to delete doesn't exist.

PHP errors don’t provide stack traces.

Not true. Debug_backtrace() will give you a stack trace in an error handler.

Most error handling is in the form of printing a line to a server log nobody reads and carrying on.

Assuming, of course, the programmer doesn't do anything to handle errors.

E_STRICT is a thing, but it doesn’t seem to actually prevent much and there’s no documentation on what it actually does.

E_STRICT (or lack of it) is for compatibility with PHP4. When enabled it will "warn you about code usage which is deprecated or which may not be future-proof." -- quote from the manual.

E_ALL includes all error categories—except E_STRICT.

Unfortunate naming here -- E_ALL is from PHP4 and prior and E_STRICT is all about PHP5. Including it in E_ALL would break PHP4 scripts running on PHP5.

Weirdly inconsistent about what’s allowed and what isn’t.

This author is confused why syntax errors would be parse errors but logic errors are not.

PHP errors and PHP exceptions are completely different beasts. They don’t seem to interact at all.

This is sort of true; PHP errors and exceptions exist in different universes but it's easy to unify them and PHP even provides a built-in exception ErrorException to do so. You can turn every PHP error into an exception with 4 lines of code complete with stack traces. You could even turn exceptions into errors but I wouldn't recommend that. PHP supports both procedural and OO programming styles -- this is not a bad thing.

There is no finally construct

C++ also doesn't have a finally construct. But C++ and PHP support RAII -- class destructors run when the stack is unwound so you can do your cleanup. Finally would be a welcome addition to both languages.

function foo() { return new __stdClass(); } leaks memory. The garbage collector can only collect garbage that has a name.

PHP is reference counted with a cycle-detecting GC. That would not leak memory.

Function arguments can have “type hints”, which are basically just static typing. But you can’t require that an argument be an int or string or object or other “core” type

This is true, but it's an ongoing discussion on how to correctly handle scalar type hints. For all the discussion about how PHP isn't designed the author takes issue with the thing they're taking their time on.

Closures require explicitly naming every variable to be closed-over. Why can’t the interpreter figure this out?

Because of the dynamic abilities of PHP, there is simply no way for the interpreter to ever figure out the variable to close over. The solution is actually a rather simple.

clone is an operator?!

Of course!

Object attributes are $obj->foo, but class attributes are $obj::foo. I’m not aware of another language that does this or how it’s useful.

C++ does it. $obj::foo doesn't make any sense, if you're accessing class attributes then you use the class name Class::foo.

Also, an instance method can still be called statically (Class::method()). If done so from another method, this is treated like a regular method call on the current $this. I think.

Only static methods can be called statically. The other calling methods statically is similar to C++ ... you can call parent class methods explicitly by name by-passing any overriding.

new, private, public, protected, static, etc. Trying to win over Java developers? I’m aware this is more personal taste, but I don’t know why this stuff is necessary in a dynamic language

This is personal taste not a valid critique.

Subclasses cannot override private methods.

That is the definition of private methods!

There is no method you can call on a class to allocate memory and create an object.

You can use reflection to create an object without calling the constructor.

Static variables inside instance methods are global; they share the same value across all instances of the class

This is the definition of a static property!

Yet a massive portion of the standard library is still very thin wrappers around C APIs

That is, in fact, the point. PHP is supposed to be a thin scripting language layer over C. It's expanded beyond that. Many of the poor naming conventions are not because of PHP but rather are the exact API of the underlying C library.

Warts like mysql_real_escape_string, even though it has the same arguments as the broken mysql_escape_string, just because it’s part of the MySQL C API.

Both the C API and PHP have both these functions for backwards compatibility reasons. This entire API is pretty much depreciated with both the mysqli library and PDO replacing it.

Using multiple MySQL connections apparently requires passing a connection handle on every function call.

Yes, exactly. That's the only way multiple connections could possibly work.

PHP basically runs as CGI. Every time a page is hit, PHP recompiles the whole thing before executing it.

Unless you use a free code cache like APC. It will eventually be built in. Most people don't need it.

For quite a long time, PHP errors went to the client by default

If you don't handle your errors, they go somewhere.

Missing features

Most of these are provided by frameworks just as they are in Python, Ruby, C#, etc.

Insecure-by-default

Most of these things are now removed from the language after being depreciated for years.

more than 2 years ago
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Inventor of the TV Remote Control Dies

duguk Coffin lid broke during burial (113 comments)

When they tried to bury him, apparently the coffin has broken - the lid has come off,
In his honour it has been sellotaped back on.

more than 2 years ago
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Microsoft Blocking Pirate Bay Links In Messenger

duguk Re:algorithms, third-party sources, or complaints. (198 comments)

You may think that it is some grand anti-piracy conspiracy, but Microsoft is right. TPB is infested with torrents that contain malware. There are people who use it to spread viruses and malware. It makes sense too - it's quite easy method to infect peoples computers.

Google is also infested with sites that contain malware. There are people who use it to spread viruses and malware. It makes sense too - it's quite easy method to infect peoples computers.

It contains a lot more viruses than TPB ever could.

Should Google be blocked too?

more than 2 years ago
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Why Making Facebook Private Won't Protect You

duguk Re:An easy solution (550 comments)

Facebook has said its users should only have one account per physical human being, and if it catches people using two accounts it will delete one of them.

They'll delete him? That's murder!

more than 2 years ago
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Cell Phone Jamming Devices Enjoy an Increase In Popularity

duguk Re:I approve (805 comments)

The peeple making the emergency calls may not necessarily be on the bus, just within range of the jammer. For example, maybe the bus is stuck in traffic due to an accident and people outside are trying to make emergency cals.

So your best reason against cellphone jammers is that there "might be someone near a bus who needs to make a call"?

I'm not singling you out personally here, but you've entirely missed the point and just replied blindly without reading the parent comments.
I said I personally think jammers are a terrible idea under any circumstance, but some of the scenarios people are using for justification against them are insane. There's far better arguments against them.

There's plenty of reasons to ban them; but no-one seems to be following the thread and instead arguing that they should be banned just because
"someone might need to make a 911 call while someone drives past with a jammer switched on who might be a part time vet who needs to visit a Corgi with a chest infection"?

I don't think that's a very substantial argument.

more than 2 years ago
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Cell Phone Jamming Devices Enjoy an Increase In Popularity

duguk Re:I approve (805 comments)

I think he was leaping ahead by assuming that if someone was assaulted, had a seizure, needed a cop or paramedic, it wouldn't be secret information.

The guy jamming the signal would know about it as well and shut off his jammer.

Thank you for being the only person who replied who got this! It seems very few people read the thread anymore.

I personally think jammers are a terrible idea under any circumstance, but some of the scenarios people are using for justification against them are insane.
There's plenty of reasons to ban them; but because "someone might need to make a 911 call on a bus"?... bloody hell.

more than 2 years ago
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Cell Phone Jamming Devices Enjoy an Increase In Popularity

duguk Re:I approve (805 comments)

Yeah and the side effect of it blocking the person trying to make a wireless 911 call. Who cares about the innocents caught in this, right?

Why would anyone be making a private 911 call on a bus? Especially without any of the other passengers knowing?

I mean, I'm not agreeing with this; but that's a ridiculous claim under this scenario.

more than 2 years ago
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Smartphones More Dangerous Than Alcohol, When Driving

duguk Re:What about non-smart (phone) users? (358 comments)

Apparently you're new here too; like I replied to the other person, this means nothing. All distractions are dangerous; but how dangerous are they? The GP asked about "Risk Change", not "Is this 'dangerous'?"; since that has such an obvious answer.

Simply remembering that I replied this way to your message may be a distraction to your driving tomorrow. Does that mean I'm a danger to your driving, and that you should be fined £50 for thinking of me?
Or should this only apply to smoking? Or to eating? Or for having passengers? Or singing to yourself? Do you see my point?

more than 2 years ago
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Smartphones More Dangerous Than Alcohol, When Driving

duguk Re:What about non-smart phones? (358 comments)

Everything is a distraction at some degree, even thinking about this message tomorrow while you're driving could distract you.

Yes or no is meaningless, and 100% is concentration is almost certainly unachievable. Stop being silly and give me numbers, dammit.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Microsoft investigates Windows 7 'screen of death'

duguk duguk writes  |  more than 4 years ago

duguk writes "Microsoft has confirmed that it is investigating a problem described as the "black screen of death", which affects Windows 7 and reports suggest it affects Vista and XP too. The firm said it was looking into reports that suggest its latest security update, released on Tuesday 25 November, cause the problem. The error means that users of Windows 7 and earlier operating systems see a totally black screen after logging on to the system."
Link to Original Source
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Twitumm - A delightful way to collect your Twitter

duguk duguk writes  |  more than 4 years ago

duguk writes "I recently put together Twitumm as an alternative to Audioboo and Utterli — which is a easy way to record audio and post it to your Twitter. Like what Twitpic has done for pictures. Written as a small project in my spare time, with a very simple scheduled FFMpeg task, all written in PHP; running on Gentoo Linux. Record your message on your phone or PC in any format, upload it, and we'll put it up for streaming; and (if you want us to) post it to your Twitter profile too.

This isn't your usual advert, I'm making no profit out of this, but am adding new features all the time. Since I'm a huge open source enthusiast (and using Gentoo!), I'd love to know what Slashdot think."

Link to Original Source
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AVG slaps Trojan label on Adobe Flash

duguk duguk writes  |  more than 5 years ago

duguk writes "The Register reports: "AVG, the popular anti-virus package, has falsely identified Adobe Flash as potentially malicious. The snafu comes just days after AVG slapped a bogus Trojan warning on a core Windows component.

Users on AVG forums complained on Friday that Adobe Flash was detected by AVG's scanner as malicious, following a recent update. The gaffe follows an even more glaring screw-up when user32.dll, a core Windows component, was identified as a banking Trojan following a signature update issued on Sunday.""

Link to Original Source
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Home Secretary Jacqui Smith prints seized by No2ID

duguk duguk writes  |  more than 5 years ago

duguk writes "The Home Secretary's fingerprints are missing, and being held by No2ID at an undisclosed location. Earlier today, No2ID General Secretary Guy Herbert told The Register, a water glass thought to have Jacqui Smith's fingerprints on it was 'borrowed' from a Social Market Foundation event where Smith was speaking. The venue of Smith's speech today was kept secret until the last minute for reasons of security.

Jacqui Smith is reported to have said "I don't want to disappoint users of this german website, but they're wasting their time. Having someone's fingerprints on a glass or even reproduced on an acetate won't get them very far. Our system will keep your fingerprints on a separate database from your personal details."

The first ID cards are due to ship to foreign nationals in less than three weeks, but the Home Secretary's dabs may be all over the country a little in advance of that. An image of the glass and her speech this morning can be found on order-order.com and the Register also has an article. On legal advice the NO2ID campaign plans to return the glass tomorrow to the speech venue."

Link to Original Source
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O2 UK mobile - Internet Blocked for some customers

duguk duguk writes  |  about 6 years ago

duguk writes "It's been reported in a number of places that UK Mobile Phone company, O2 are blocking some internet ports for some customers.

It appears that although Contract customers on the mobile network are fully able to access email and SSH via their mobile phone, yet customers subscribed through 'Pay as you Go' (PAYG; a non-subscription service, paid up in front as credit), are only given WAP access, which only provides very basic HTTP access.

Essentially this means that anyone with a pay-in-front service agreement won't be able to access their email or use anything apart from basic HTTP, even though O2 are now selling and advertising the new Apple iPhone on PAYG and stating it will support "all the same features as contract customers".

It's been reported that on contacting O2, they state its a technical problem and one that can't be resolved, yet it's also been mentioned that their own O2 POP3 mail service does work, but access to any other service doesn't.

Are O2 right to restrict access for customers not on a fixed contract? Does your mobile phone company do the same thing? And are O2 advertising unfairly?"

Link to Original Source
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MSN Search attacking sites?

duguk duguk writes  |  more than 6 years ago

duguk writes "I keep (as in usually daily) see this in my logs:

65.55.210.11 — - [13/Jun/2008:00:22:34 +0100] "GET /robots.txt HTTP/1.1" 404 275
65.55.210.11 — - [13/Jun/2008:00:22:34 +0100] "GET /admin/ HTTP/1.1" 401 468

Oh, it's just someone seeing if my website is insecure, it's not insecure there — but have fun looking.

Wait a second. I'll just check that IP... it looks a bit weird.

65.55.210.11 resolves to msnbot-65-55-210-11.search.msn.com

OrgName: Microsoft Corp
OrgID: MSFT
Address: One Microsoft Way
City: Redmond
StateProv: WA
PostalCode: 98052
Country: US

Why is MSN Search Spider doing this?

I don't have an /admin/ folder, and NEVER have. I don't even have a robots.txt

MSN Admins won't reply to me, and the feedback forms are ignored.

Is there anything I can or should do about this?"

Link to Original Source
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MSN Search attacking sites?

duguk duguk writes  |  more than 6 years ago

duguk writes "I was just tailing my logs earlier (as you do), and I saw this in my log:

65.55.210.11 — - [13/Jun/2008:00:22:34 +0100] "GET /robots.txt HTTP/1.1" 404 275
65.55.210.11 — - [13/Jun/2008:00:22:34 +0100] "GET /admin/ HTTP/1.1" 404 468

Oh, it's just someone seeing if my website is insecure, it's not insecure — but have fun looking.

Wait a second. I'll just check that IP... it looks a bit weird.

65.55.210.11 resolves to msnbot-65-55-210-11.search.msn.com

OrgName: Microsoft Corp
OrgID: MSFT
Address: One Microsoft Way
City: Redmond
StateProv: WA
PostalCode: 98052
Country: US

Why is MSN looking at my /admin/ folder? Has anyone else had this?

For the record, I don't have an admin folder, and I don't have a robots.txt.

Any thoughts anyone?

I've contacted Microsoft, but naturally, they don't reply to anything :)"

Link to Original Source
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Filesharers petition Downing Street

duguk duguk writes  |  more than 6 years ago

duguk writes "From the recent article, UK ISPs To Face Piracy Deadline

The Register has done a two-page commentry on the new law and the Petition on the UK PM site (which I am the author of). From the article:

A petition urging the Prime Minister not to introduce "three strikes" legislation against illegal filesharing has made its debut on the 10 Downing Street website.
In their campaign for digital freedoms, peer to peer users are demanding that the government doesn't force the issue. But ironically, they are inadvertently wishing themselves a world where their online activities are governed by an opaque industry settlement, negotiated in secret.

From the petition:

'The government will soon tell internet service providers they will be hit with legal sanctions from April next year unless they take concrete steps to curb illegal downloads of music and films. Britain would be one of the first countries in the world to impose such sanctions. Service providers say what the government wants them to do would be like asking the Royal Mail to monitor the contents of every envelope posted.'

Whether or not you believe the contravertial UK petition site is workable, please sign the petition and contact your MP using WriteToThem.com.""

Link to Original Source
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UK Petition - Keep ISPs as Common Carriers

duguk duguk writes  |  more than 6 years ago

duguk writes "From the recent article, UK ISPs To Face Piracy Deadline, I have started a UK Petition on the UK PM Petition site.

'The government will soon tell internet service providers they will be hit with legal sanctions from April next year unless they take concrete steps to curb illegal downloads of music and films. Britain would be one of the first countries in the world to impose such sanctions. Service providers say what the government wants them to do would be like asking the Royal Mail to monitor the contents of every envelope posted.'
I have started a petition on the UK PM Petition site. Whether or not you believe the contravertial UK petition site is workable, please sign the petition and contact your MP using WriteToThem.com."
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duguk duguk writes  |  more than 7 years ago

duguk writes "Apple has launched a version of its web browser Safari for Windows, competing head to head with Microsoft's Explorer and Mozilla's Firefox. Download the beta from http://www.apple.com/uk/safari/download/.

Chief executive Steve Jobs said Apple "dream big" and wanted to expand the 4.9% market share Safari enjoys. He said Safari was "the fastest browser on Windows", saying it was twice as fast as Internet Explorer.

A test version of Safari 3 for Windows XP, Vista and Apple Macs running OSX, is available for download from the Apple website."

Link to Original Source
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duguk duguk writes  |  more than 7 years ago

duguk writes "As most of you will probably end up ill over the winter season, it might be best to keep happy over Christmas. A new scientific study suggests that people who have a positive outlook are less likely to catch colds. Psychologist Sheldon Cohen and his colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University exposed more than 300 healthy adults to a cold virus and interviewed them about their emotional state. Those with "generally positive outlooks... reported fewer cold symptoms than were detected in medical exams.

From Science News:
"We need to take more seriously the possibility that a positive emotional style is a major player in disease risk," Cohen says.

Those who displayed generally positive outlooks, including feelings of liveliness, cheerfulness, and being at ease, were least likely to develop cold symptoms. Unlike the negatively inclined participants, they reported fewer cold symptoms than were detected in medical exams.

The new study, which appears in the November/December Psychosomatic Medicine, replicates those results and rules out the possibility that psychological traits related to a positive emotional style, rather than the emotions themselves, guard against cold symptoms. Those traits include high self-esteem, extroversion, optimism, and a feeling of mastery over one's life."

Keep happy and you might not get ill?"
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duguk duguk writes  |  more than 7 years ago

duguk writes "Two Canadians last week won their 15 minutes of fame by standing in line for two days to splash out CAD550 on a 20GB PS3s — only to take the machine straight out of the store and destroy it with a sledgehammer. "I did it for the thrill and to see people's expression," Victor Moukhortov, a 17-year-old part-time student, told the Ottawa Sun. "It was like a social experiment to see people's reaction.

More information including video here The pair told the newspaper they were planning to do the same with a Nintendo Wii on its 19 November release. It's not known whether they made good on their pledge."
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duguk duguk writes  |  more than 7 years ago

duguk writes "As rumoured last week, Google has agreed to purchase popular video sharing site YouTube for $1.65 billion in stock, the two companies announced after the close of the stock market Monday. The deal marks the largest acquisition for Google in the company's eight-year history. A potential deal had been rumored since late last week, prompting surprise from a number of industry watchers who failed to see what Google would gain from the purchase. However, the search giant says it will unite YouTube with its online advertising platform. More information is available on Google News"

Journals

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Welcome to my Journal

duguk duguk writes  |  more than 2 years ago

The only reason I'm posting in here is to get an achievement.

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