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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

dywolf Re:Militia, then vs now (1462 comments)

to be clear, the picture specifically identifies one Eric Parker as the man holding the rifle sighted in.
The attribution of the picture is to Jim Urquhart at Reuters.

Just one of many that prove you wrong:

Eric Parker from central Idaho aims his weapon from a bridge as protesters gather by the Bureau of Land Management's base camp, where cattle that were seized from rancher Cliven Bundy are being held, near Bunkerville, Nevada April 12, 2014. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

And there are other photos of the same gentleman, on wingnut "freedom" blogs all clearly labeling him as a member of the militia, proudly proclaiming the he "was providing cover for the patriots".

I say again: You are an idiot.

6 hours ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

dywolf Re:Militia, then vs now (1462 comments)

you're an idiot.
go away.

6 hours ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

dywolf Re:Militia, then vs now (1462 comments)

interesting thing about facts is they dont require your belief.
no statement i made is untrue.
your lack of belief is irrelevant.

as i said, its very simple.

It's only if you listen to Faux news, particularly Mr Hannity who especially has been egging this on, is it possible for you have ANY questions as to the simplicity of the case, or Bundy's complete and total lack of veracity.

6 hours ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

dywolf Re:No. (1462 comments)

classic "he disagrees with me, therefore he is wrong" fallacy.

12 hours ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

dywolf Re: Bundy (1462 comments)

You basically got every single thing wrong about the case.

12 hours ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

dywolf Re:Militia, then vs now (1462 comments)

They've been peaceful the whole time, and did nothing more than provide a presence and protest. The only difference between them and Occupy $location is the presence of firearms - none of which were brandished by the protesters, let alone used in a threatening manner.

The pictures of militia men on bridges with scoped rifles sighted in and pointed at the BLM trucks would beg to differ.

12 hours ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

dywolf Re:Militia, then vs now (1462 comments)

I'm from Nevada, since before this was even local news two decades ago.
I'm VERY familiar with this case.

This is exactly and precisely about freeloader grazing.

No one, NOT ONE PERSON from the feds threatened any violence or murder.
The ONLY ONES to do so are Bundy and his militia supporters.

You are wrong and nothing you have stated about it is factual.
It's that simple.
Go away liar.

12 hours ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

dywolf Re:Militia, then vs now (1462 comments)

it does belong to the people.
that fact disagrees with you, or that enough people disagree with you create laws you dont like, doesnt change that fact.

12 hours ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

dywolf Re:Militia, then vs now (1462 comments)

But one can also argue the Feds enacted unethical policies and mis-used laws, in an abusive way.

No.
You can't.
You really cannot make that argument AT ALL.

It's simple property rights.
The case is NOT complicated.
The feds ownership claim by far pre-dates his claim.

It's federal land. Period.
It's not and has never been his land or his family's. Period.

For many years Bundy has grazed his cattle on that land.
For many years Bundy paid the required fees (think "rent") for that priviledge.
Then Bundy stopped paying.

But continued using it, even after being ordered by several courts to abide by very basic property rights, THAT EVERYONE ELSE ABIDES BY.

The fed did nothing, not one thing, abusive or unethical.
The only one doing anything abusive or unethical is Bundy, violating basic laws of property, tresspassing, and lease contracts.

And then there's that whole threatening violence against federal BLM employees, and not recognizing the federal government and constitution, only the nevada government and costitution, even though the envada constitution specifically spells out as a matter of law that Nevada is a part of the United States and holds the federal government and constitution as legally valid entities, and holds allegiance to them.

12 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Good Print Media Is Left?

dywolf Re:The Economist (279 comments)

Economist
National Geographic
Analog
NYTimes
New Yorker
Discover Magazine
Time
Life, before it went out of print...still worth tracking down copies if you can.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: What Good Print Media Is Left?

dywolf Re:NYTimes is left I believe. (279 comments)

The NYTimes is as close to middle of the road journalistic integrity as you can get. It is far, FAR from being "just a liberal rag". They print opinion pieces from nearly anyone, on any subject, on nearly any stance. They just recently published Jenny MacCarthy. In the past they've published Ronald Reagan. They've written both in support and against the middle east involvements, often in the same issue.

The Grey Lady is not to treated so badly or dismissed so simply.

Also, if your opinion is that simply using facts and logic are what make one a liberal, then that implies that a lack of those things is what makes one a conservative....and certain individuals are doing a VERY good job of proving that point.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: What Good Print Media Is Left?

dywolf Re:The Economist (279 comments)

same thing. grandparents have Nat Geo mags going back to 1945. I read their entire collection over the course of a 6 or 7 summers of visits in the 90s. I'd gladly include Nat Geo on the list of magazines to read. I'd include Life if it was still around, but since its not, I have to be content with tracking down old TimeLife books when the libraries sell off older collections. The geography ones ("The Sierra Madre", "The Russian Steppes"...) were a high point of photo essay literature. Life itself is to me just such an iconic publication I find it hard to accept that it went away. I get that the internet makes it theoretically easier to do the same thing (visually travel to far off places)...but it the coherence and thematic consistancy of the Life publications and books as I remember them.

yesterday
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

dywolf Re:Militia, then vs now (1462 comments)

hah. you called slashdot conservative (and im not one generally speaking).

on topic:
I'm all for rephrasing it to make it clearer.
i believe there are two possible interpretations:

1:
the assumption of a militia as a band of men/volunteers as seperate from a standing army and as a potential counter to that army. this militia is essential to the security of a free state by providing the means with which to resist an overpowering government. thus, its essential this militia be able to arm itself.

problems with this is the Militia of the United States is now called the National Gaurd and fall under the command of the US Army, even though the governors can call them out for various states of emergency. specifically part of the Army Reserves. National Guard members are thus both part of hte Army and comprise the legally defined US militia (the us militia also includes "all able bodied men ages suchandsuch", part of which was the basic for conscriptiona nd the draft, etc etc....deeper than this is intended to go). some states also have state militias, but that's also deeper than this is inteded to go. The effective difference in the National Guard and the Army is essentially nil, since they are now essentially just hte Army Reserve (or part of it), and thus fully capable of being delpoyed overseas to augment or relieve regular army units, as we've seen in the past decade and a half.

To sum up, the problem here: If the militia is intended in the USC as the counter to the government's standing army, then we now have created a conflict of interest as the counter to the standing army is now considered part of it.

this is also the primary problem with the book authors addition, as his rephrasing implicitly assumes this interpretation, while ignoring the present status of the National Guard.

2:
the other interpretation swaps the role of the militia, and equates the militia with the concept of an official military force, regardless of form (standing army or volunteer militia). This interpretation says that "while a militia, or standing army, or national defense force, or whatever you want to call it, is neccesary to the security of a free state from outside forces, this is a neccessary evil. we distrust standing armies, and thus every citizen shall have the right to be armed in potential defense against such a force being used against its own people".

this is the concept i hew to, as it seems to most accurately reflect the founder's pholisophies and experiences with standing armies. it also creates many potential problems. for one, Disparity of Force. We have guns, the military has tanks and bombers and battleships. its basically impossible to achieve its stated goal of resistance if push actually came to shove.

another, is some people simply shouldnt be allowed to have guns. societally we have solved this one by basically saying, well, reasonable gun controls are OK. And I support that notion. of course, the devil is in the details of what constitutes "reasonable". for some anything and everything is unreasonable, and for others a blanket ban is totally reasonable.

me, i say background checks and short waiting period are essential, reasonable, and common sense, plus they give a dealer/seller peace of mind that he isnt inadvertantly aiding a criminal act (though admittedly there are some dealers who wouldnt care). even if the individual still obtains a weapon illegally, at the least it wasnt made too easy for him to do so.

and there are the additional problems of the times and society and its attitudes have changed. in this hyper partisan atmosphere we recently had "militias" ready to shoot and kill BLM agents simply for enforcing the governments property rights against a rancher in nevada who decided he can use land that isnt his for free. (abject hypocrisy and stupidity by these individuals, but what else is new?)

yesterday
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Intuit, Maker of Turbotax, Lobbies Against Simplified Tax Filings

dywolf Re:What the tax form should look like (415 comments)

The flat tax is still regressive and disproportionately affects poor and low income folks.
It sounds good, but you must remember that while you can scale a tax as a flat percentage of income, you can't scale the minimum cost of living (MCOL). Its the flip side of the "decreasing value of money" theory.

This is generally handled by the marginal tax bracket system, which is what we use: splitting your income into portions, and then say from 0-20k, you pay 0% on that portion of income (first 20k free), then from >20k to 40K, pay say 10% on that portion, and then 12% on the next portion, on up the line.

ideally, the result is more effective and efficient at acounting for the MCOL of low incomes while still providing sufficient revenue and fairly evenly distributing the tax burden across a population, such that folks all pay roughly the same % as a function of their purchasing power not just income. but the devil is in the details, and this is where the special inerest come in, such as the GOP cutitng the top marginal rates (ie, the infamous tax cuts for the rich).

you can handle it in a flat tax system by simply exempting the first 10k (or whatever) dollars, but now youve created the basis of a marginal tax bracket system, albeit one with a single sharp inflection instead of a smooth curve, so might as well go full monty with the thing.

2 days ago
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Intuit, Maker of Turbotax, Lobbies Against Simplified Tax Filings

dywolf Re:Government jobs (415 comments)

The problem is that the government doesn't generally have a good way to prune back services that are no longer required and doesn't tend to be exposed to market forces forcing it to be efficient.

Not true at all. You propogated several myths.

Myth 1: Government programs never die.
Reality: Government programs die all the time. Some fade away never to be heard from again, others are explicitly killed once they're run their course and achieved their purposes. An average of 38 programs die every year. Since the mid 90s nearly 650 government programs have been put out to pasture.

Myth 2: Government programs inherently inefficient, less so than market forces.
Reality: Government specifically tackles those issues which the market either can't and hasn't, or are specifically and inherently inefficient for the market to handle. IE, market failures. Public utilities, public infrastructure, and other public goods are the perfect examples. Social programs, particulary the safety nets also. Healthcare is the defacto best example: the governement programs (medicare/medicaid) are the single most efficient and effective segments of our healthcare industry, far far more so than the private insurance segments. As a whole our entire industry costs far more (200-300%) on average than any other country while providing far less...but split into segments and the government programs are only about 40% above countries, while the private segments are >400% above.

There have been many empirical studies examining the efficiency of government bureaucracies versus business in a variety of areas, including refuse collection, electrical utilities, public transportation, water supply systems, and hospital administration. The findings have been mixed. Some studies of electric utilities have found that publicly owned ones were more efficient and charged lower prices than privately owned utilities. Several other studies found the opposite, and yet others found no significant differences.6 Studies of other services produced similar kinds of mixed results. Charles Goodsell is a professor of Public Administration and Public Affairs at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University who has spent much of his life studying bureaucracy. After examining these efficiency studies, he concluded: “In short, there is much evidence that is ambivalent. The assumption that business always does better than government is not upheld. When you add up all these study results, the basis for the mantra that business is always better evaporates.”

Further evidence that business is not always superior to government bureaucracy can be found in the area of health care. This is a critical issue today and it is well worth examining in some detail the question of whether market-based health care is superior to government run programs. Conservatives constantly warn us that adopting “socialized” medicine would put health care in the hands of government bureaucracies, which would be a recipe for incredible waste and inferior care. But is this really the case? We can answer this question by comparing the performance of public versus private health care systems. Every other developed country has some form of universal health care with a substantial amount of public funding and administration. In contrast, while the U.S. has a few programs like Medicare and Medicaid, most of our health care system is privately funded and administered. According to conservative mythology, this market-based system should produce better health care and do so more cheaply. But neither of these claims hold up when we look at studies of the actual performance of public and private approaches to providing health care.

First, studies have found that the U.S. health care system is by far the most expensive in the world. We spend 13.6% of our gross domestic product on health care – the highest in the world. The average for the other 13 industrialized countries in the OECD is 8.2%.8 We also rank number one in terms of health care expenditures per capita, with U.S. spending $4,090 a year for every citizen. The highest figures for other industrialized nations are $2,547 per year for Switzerland, $2,339 for Germany, $2,340 for Luxembourg, and $2,095 for Canada.9 But while we clearly have the most expensive health care system in the world, it does not always deliver the best health care nor does it provide health care in the most efficient way.

http://www.governmentisgood.co...

Another example is space, and the article touches on that as well. Then there's R&D, science, education. The list goes on and on.

The short of it is this: goverment is NOT inherently sheilded from the market, unless specifically designed to be such. It can and usually is very active in the market and has direct effects on it. Public options in the market have long, LONG, been known to have the effect of keeping prices downa nd forcing innovation and further efficiency in the market by the private actors just by virtue of the need to compete with and attract customers away from the public options.

2 days ago
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Million Jars of Peanut Butter Dumped In New Mexico Landfill

dywolf Re:Rancid Peanut Butter? Mmmmm. (440 comments)

rancid does not mean "bad for you". rancid is just another name for oxidized, specifically of fat.
it would still be perfectly edible and harmless to your body. would just taste funny.

peanut butter basically doesnt go bad. its naturally highly resistant to microbes taking root and growing, and natuarlly very long lasting.
thats why the salmonella contamination incident was so shocking originally. it wasnt like a bad peanut got in the batch. it was outside contamination, such as of the machinery in the processing plant.

stale is another word that people unfairly take to mean "spoiled" or "bad for you".

about two weeks ago
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Million Jars of Peanut Butter Dumped In New Mexico Landfill

dywolf Re:Without James Sinegal, Costco is not well manag (440 comments)

"who knows what organisms have made the jar their home"

None. Peanut butter doesn't go bad. High fat and oil content, low moisture means its naturally long lasting. All that happens is the fatty oils may go rancid from oxidation after a year; if it stays vacuum sealed longer than that.

about two weeks ago
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L.A. Police: All Cars In L.A. Are Under Investigation

dywolf Re:Everyone is a potential criminal in L.A. (405 comments)

forgot my link to Federal Digital System, where the actual laws themselves are: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/
the menu is on the right, with links to the Code of Federal Regulations, list of presidential and congressional documents, court decisions, etc etc.

about three weeks ago
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L.A. Police: All Cars In L.A. Are Under Investigation

dywolf Re:Everyone is a potential criminal in L.A. (405 comments)

you're misinterpretting a very simple concept. they cant agree on a number because they dont agree on what constitutent a seperate law or crime. one group interprets a passage as describing one crime, while another thinks its multiple crimes or regulations.

that's the problem with this little piece of pop culture: its used to insinuate that non one even knows how many laws there are, as if there are hundreds or thousands just hidden away....

after all, its not like we keep them all written down in books anywhere...

oh wait, THATS EXACTLY WHAT WE DO.
its possible to sit down and count all the words, all hte sections, all the paragrahs, all the volumes, of all the law in the US. the problem is simply that the people doing the counting have different opinions as to what groups of words, sentences, sections and paragraphs comprise discrete laws and regulations. its like a giant messily written program with tons of GOTO and GOSUB statements sprinkled throughout it.

you can start your own count at the Federal Register ( https://www.federalregister.go... ) ...you know, the guys actually responsible for writing it all down and keeping track of all the things Congress and the Federal Agencies do.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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America's Internet is the Best, Europe's a failure, says Washington DC Expert

dywolf dywolf writes  |  about 7 months ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "Harry Alford, the CEO of the NBCC in Washington, D.C., has written that that America's Internet is the best in the world. "85% of Americans enjoy 100MBps internet, blowing away Europe where only 50 percent of households can access even one-third of that speed". And not only is our system the envy of the world, thanks to the deregulations of the Clinton Era telecommunications reforms and the free market, but Europe's internet access is a complete failure due to overregulation. "It's why America's Internet is faster than in leading Eurpean nations. The greatest Internet companies in the world — from Amazon to Facebook — are American companies. We should stick with the free-market system that's worked so well.""
Link to Original Source
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CEO of National Black Chamber of Congress says America's Internet is the Best

dywolf dywolf writes  |  about 7 months ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "Harry Alford, the CEO of the National Black Chamber of Congress in Washington, D.C., wrote into The Oklahoman newspaper to rebut a previous letter to the editor decrying the stat of America's Internet. He tells tell us not to fear, that America's Internet is the best in the world. Apparently "85% of Americans enjoy 100MBps internet, blowing away Europe where only 50 percent of households can access even one-third of that speed". And not only is our system the envy of the world, thanks to the deregulations of the Clinton Era telecommunications reforms, but Europe's internet access is a complete failure due to overregulation. The letter can be found here: http://newsok.com/free-market-system-worked-for-americas-internet/article/3879006"
Link to Original Source
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Writer extols crowd sourced crime solving...while ignoring it's failure

dywolf dywolf writes  |  about a year ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "Gary C. Kessler, a contributor to CNN Opinion, has written a piece in which he extols the virtues of crowdsourcing, and how it helped capture the Bostom bombers....except for that part where crowdsourcing failed to indentity the real suspects, and actually led to some false accusations. He then goes on to talk about the privacy issues involved in constant public surveillance. From the article: "The Boston Marathon bombing investigation made use of crowdsourcing to collect photos and video from cell phones and surveillance cameras at an unprecedented level. These pictures were made public a little more than 72 hours after the explosions and the second suspect was arrested 29 hours later.
[...]
The U.S. Constitution does not explicitly offer citizens a right of privacy, although many court decisions certainly support such an ideal. Indeed, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis is well known for his observation, 'The right to be left alone — the most comprehensive of rights, and the right most valued by a free people.'""

Link to Original Source
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Hostess, maker of Twinkies, to shutdown

dywolf dywolf writes  |  about a year and a half ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "In a shocking and disturbing bit of news Hostess, unable to work out a new contract with its bakers who are striking, has filed for bankrupty and requested permission from the court to shutdown operations. The world's most perfect food in the upcoming apocalypse may disappear as the Twinkie supply dwindles."
Link to Original Source
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Electronic Arts pulls Bait and Switch with FIFA 13

dywolf dywolf writes  |  about a year and a half ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "Electronic Arts has released FIFA 13. The problem? It's FIFA 12 with a new box. Same graphics, same modes, literally the same everything. Other than new socks for your players."
Link to Original Source
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Indian Superbug gene found in American cat

dywolf dywolf writes  |  about a year and a half ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "The NDM-1 story has been long and contentious (my archive of posts is here), but from the first, two things have been clear. However the political battles fall out, medicine views the emergence of this gene as a catastrophe, because it edges organisms to the brink of being completely non-responsive to antibiotics, as untreatable as if the infections were contracted before the antibiotic era began. And because the gene resides in organisms that happily live in the gut without causing symptoms, NDM-1 has been a hidden catastrophe, crossing borders and entering hospitals without ever being detected."
Link to Original Source

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