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Councilmen Introduce Bills Strongly Regulating UAV Use in NYC

dywolf Re:hooray for the government (63 comments)

oh please.
stow your insanity for a moment.

differing classes of rules based on size and type make sense.
and standard "congested area" rules are just common sense.
licenses or other certs in specific circumstances also make sense.

unregulated use by an unlicensed individual in a city like NYC means eventually someone will fly a 100+lb drone down Park Avenue and have it crash on someones head.
or worse two of them due to collision.

public safety/endangerment rules always in place would largely cover a lot of it, but they would leave a lot open to the interpretation and discretion of the individuals responsible for enforcement (most likely NYPD).

so creating some rules that actually spell it out, and make the appropriate concessions for commercial use, ensure operators and their devices arent a danger, and provide common sense exceptions for recreational use in Central Park, all fall within the purview of City Council (or w/e NYC has), and is simply rational rules making and is in the public interest.

yesterday
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In Breakthrough, US and Cuba To Resume Diplomatic Relations

dywolf Re:Failed state policies (409 comments)

then explain Europe.
I'll wait.

yesterday
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In Breakthrough, US and Cuba To Resume Diplomatic Relations

dywolf Re:Failed state policies (409 comments)

your proof is a national review article? please.

actual doctors who study this stuff have destroyed that piece of garbage so many times its not even funny anymore.
the article presents it as if its the only one that realized that people measure statistics differently, but publish research anyway...without compensating for the differences.

news for ya buddy: the researchers and statisticians are well aware of hte differences and if you bother to read their papers include the fact that they have compensated for them, and even how they did so.

And about that "all those illegals that Obama let in: Enforcement is at all time highs. More people have been deported than under any other president. The last few years have actually seen a negative flow rate across the Mexican border (thats right: more crossing into mexico than entering the US)

So the only bull around here is yours.

yesterday
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Startup Magic Leap Hires Sci-Fi Writer Neal Stephenson As Chief Futurist

dywolf Futurist...dumbest/easiest "job" in the world (46 comments)

I hate when people are described as "futurists" and then presented as some sort of authority or given a salary with the title.

Nothing but a long con.

yesterday
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In Breakthrough, US and Cuba To Resume Diplomatic Relations

dywolf Re:About Fucking Time (409 comments)

A couple of airstrikes in Libya counts as a war now?
The 60s also notably lacked a crushing recession; you're comparing a time of economic prosperity to a time of recession recovery.

And oh yay. More jobs numbers nonsense. But hey, since were comparing economic apples to oranges, lets note that in the 60s the "real" unemployment rate was >40%, since most families weren't dual income and as a result overall labor participiation was far lower, and those wives "would have been working if they werent at home raising babies". That totally proves my point about how your point is nonsense...right? Or maybe we should just stick to the existing definitions of unemployment, which means accepting that the rate is below 8% (actually much lower), but has the drawback of you dont get to bash the POTUS with made up numbers drawn from thin air that include "people who would be working if they werent in college".

2 days ago
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NASA Study Proposes Airships, Cloud Cities For Venus Exploration

dywolf Re:As with all space missions: (195 comments)

No No No No a million times NO.

Prior to 1492, everyone knew the world was round, and had known so since the time of Ptolemy if not before.

FTFY.

Yes, he did sail west based on his knowledge that hte Earth was round.
But no, Columbus did not sail west to show the flat earthers they were wrong.
And you should stop spreading that myth.

Everyone knew the Earth the round.
But no one believed sailing west was a shorter more direct route (and this was based on math and geometry)

In case you missed it, the sea route from Europe to India has to go around that big hunk of land called Africa.
That route involves sailing south several thousand miles, then back north another few thousand, as well as traversing the eastward distance.
It's a long, dangerous route taking as long as a year there and back
It was desirable though due to the Sil Road (overland) being unsafe in recent years due to the rise of the Ottomans.

And this is still the time when most sailing is done in close proximity to shore, with shore not far over the horizon.
And the open ocean not being well charted yet if at all.

If the earth was round, which every one knew, and of a specific diameter, which was also already calculated and fairly accurate, then it was apparent that the westward distance to India was indeed longer than the Eastward distance to India.

But math of a sphere is simple and easy, whereas the math of actual navigation of sailing ship taking a long roundabout route around africa is more difficult and less accurate at the time.

And that brings us back to Columbus.
His bet was essentially that while the direct distance was obvious longer, that he could make up for it with directness by not having to go around Africa.
This view was based on the ideas of geography of Toscanelli, who did not concieve of a large land mass in the way.

It was a risky venture in the face of a known and profitable route, and few would take him up on it (businessmen being ever adverse to risk).
But he finally got his sponsor and off he went.

And it turned out he was wrong.
Both his math was wrong, as his assumption that there would be nothing in the way.

A good summary of his flawed reasoning and surrounding factors is presented on the wiki ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C... ) :

From d'Ailly's Imago Mundi Columbus learned of Alfraganus's estimate that a degree of latitude (or a degree of longitude along the equator) spanned 56 miles, but did not realize that this was expressed in the Arabic mile rather than the shorter Roman mile with which he was familiar (1,480 m).[30] He therefore estimated the circumference of the Earth to be about 30,200 km, whereas the correct value is 40,000 km (25,000 mi).

Furthermore, most scholars accepted Ptolemy's estimate that Eurasia spanned 180 longitude, rather than the actual 130 (to the Chinese mainland) or 150 (to Japan at the latitude of Spain). Columbus, for his part, believed the even higher estimate of Marinus of Tyre, which put the longitudinal span of the Eurasian landmass at 225, leaving only 135 of water. He also believed that Japan (which he called "Cipangu", following Marco Polo) was much larger, farther to the east from China ("Cathay"), and closer to the equator than it is, and that there were inhabited islands even farther to the east than Japan, including the mythical Antillia, which he thought might lie not much farther to the west than the Azores. In this, he was influenced by the ideas of Florentine astronomer Toscanelli, who corresponded with Columbus before his death in 1482 and who also defended the feasibility of a westward route to Asia.[31]

Columbus therefore estimated the distance from the Canary Islands to Japan to be about 3,000 Italian miles (3,700 km, or 2,300 statute miles). The true figure is now known to be vastly larger: about 12,500 km. No ship in the 15th century could have carried enough food and fresh water for such a long voyage, and the dangers involved in navigating through the uncharted ocean would have been formidable. Most European navigators reasonably concluded that a westward voyage from Europe to Asia was unfeasible. The Catholic Monarchs, however, having completed an expensive war in the Iberian Peninsula, were eager to obtain a competitive edge over other European countries in the quest for trade with the Indies. Columbus's project, though far-fetched, held the promise of such an advantage.

As you can see, Columbus made a unit conversion error.
Then he overestimated the size of the land mass and thus undersstimated the size of the ocean inbetween.
Then he found out his assumption of there being nothing in the way was incorrect.

Columbus is quite simply one of the most striking examples of a person being compeltely and totally wrong, and getting lucky.
Columbus was neither a hero nor genius, but an incompetent, and as it turned out later, a despot.

2 days ago
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11 Trillion Gallons of Water Needed To End California Drought

dywolf Re:11 Trillion Gallons? (315 comments)

a lot of it needs to go back into the ground, into the underground aquafers, instead of just running to the ocean. large portions of the state have sunken because of the depleted gruond water. Areas are as much as 20-40 feet lower than they were a half century ago.

California is also more dependent on its snowpack than actual precipation.
Its an arid state that recieves little precipitation outside of the mountains.
most of its yearly water supply comes from the snowpack of the Sierra mountains, acting like a time release capsule, relasing water over the year into the streams and rivers.

2 days ago
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11 Trillion Gallons of Water Needed To End California Drought

dywolf Re:But but but (315 comments)

"There is no drought"

And you idiots modded this guy insightful?

Even without all the ag and all the people, cali would STILL be in a drought.

The state water supply comes from the snowpack in the mountains, as the snowpack melts.
It normally gets replenished in winter.
The past few years ahve seen very little snowfall, leading to no replenishment of the snowpack.
Which means less and less water running into the water systems each year.

Ergo: DROUGHT.

2 days ago
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Single Group Dominates Second Round of Anti Net-Neutrality Comment Submissions

dywolf Re:Conservatives mostly don't like the involvement (182 comments)

thats not even a valid logical argument. after you talked about last mile, he also talked about last mile, specifically the from the box to the house, and then you accuesed him of being stupid by talking about NOT-last mile cable laying and some stupid failed car analogy. JFC you are stupid. his whole point is that it make no sense to redo the cabling anytime you switch proviers, no more than it makes sense to dig up your driveway and connect to a "different" road if libertarians ever got their "private/subscription road market" fantasies fulfilled. its simply another area that is best served by a single entity because it makes for a natural monopoly and the costs to consumers of trying to create a "market" for them are out of proportion to any benefit recieved from doing so.

but since you want to talk about that: barring the invention of teleportation there pretty much is only one way to put things in the ground, and it involves digging a hole.
They already use conduit in many places, and horizontal drilling and cable pulling, buts its limited in practicality because of the magnitude of force needed to pull/push cable over long distance would break the cable. which means the access points cant be very far apart. and they have to route around other underground infrastructure. they cant just go in straight lines for long distances. and you cant push/pull around corners (again: breaks the cable).

Idiots like you shouldn't enter speculative discussions.

Take thine own advice knave.

2 days ago
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Single Group Dominates Second Round of Anti Net-Neutrality Comment Submissions

dywolf Re:Conservatives mostly don't like the involvement (182 comments)

Bull.
Conservatives do not care and have never cared about restricting monopolies.
Only one side of the spectrum has taken the position that restricting monoplies in order to promote competition is "punishing success".

Protecting the interests of entrenched corporations is a conservative position, regardless of the party doing it.

Breaking up monpolies to promote the concept that "anyone can make it in the land of opportunity" by fostering competition and breaking up monpolies has always been and will always be a progressive position.

2 days ago
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Single Group Dominates Second Round of Anti Net-Neutrality Comment Submissions

dywolf Re: "shadowy" ties to the Koch brothers' network. (182 comments)

Translation: i dont like the facts, so I'm going to accuse you of bias, as if that allows me to ignore inconvenient facts.

2 days ago
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Single Group Dominates Second Round of Anti Net-Neutrality Comment Submissions

dywolf Re:I'd expect Fawkes masks to start making stateme (182 comments)

the state never has to answer to the market

1) the service is run like a utility, you pay for services through monthly bill, not through taxes
2) you dont have to sign up for the service
3) the state is only unaccoutnable if you choose not to particpate in this thing we have called democracy.
4) News flash: Comcast exists right now in market that is NOT controlled by the state.

you are an ignorant fool who didnt say one factual thing.

2 days ago
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Single Group Dominates Second Round of Anti Net-Neutrality Comment Submissions

dywolf Re:I'd expect Fawkes masks to start making stateme (182 comments)

and youre projecting again.
the liar and fool is you, as nothing you just stated is factual.
most europeans do not have lower incomes than the US. they have higher, and they have a higher purchasing power parity.

2 days ago
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Researchers Accidentally Discover How To Turn Off Skin Aging Gene

dywolf Re:Just skin? (170 comments)

its one of hte areas most prone to damage as you age. it gets thinner, its less able to repair itself, less able to protect the body internals, sun damage, skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, etc.

2 days ago
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Linking Drought and Climate Change: Difficult To Do

dywolf Re:Mean and fluctuations (192 comments)

at its root its simply a basic probability concept, but many people have seemingly forgotten it.

if you have a perfect coin you expect 50/50 heads/tails over time.
if you then modify your perfect coin to be slightly heavier on the heads side, you may expect over time to see an increase in the number of heads over time. say 51/49.
but you cant state than any given toss that came up heads was due to your modification; that without the modification outcome would have been different.
thats a very difficult thing to prove, and its true about coin tosses, and its true about climate.

we can see the influence over time quite easily with the change in trend over a sufficient sample size, but the linking of specific events will always be difficult.

2 days ago
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Linking Drought and Climate Change: Difficult To Do

dywolf Re:Why is this hard? (192 comments)

yes, all that data, all those observations, they're all based on faith, rather than measurements taken by devices around the world measuring well understand physical phenomena, and showing a clear trendline of increasing energy on a planetary scale.

2 days ago
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Linking Drought and Climate Change: Difficult To Do

dywolf Re:It's difficult but (192 comments)

and thus you prove you know nothing, about CO2, Jon Snow.
we've covered this at least a dozen times: you're wrong.

youre wrong about the economic costs.
youre wrong about CO2 not being a pollutant.
youre wrong about it not being better for life as we know.
youre wrong about the availability of technology.

2 days ago
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Linking Drought and Climate Change: Difficult To Do

dywolf Re:Linking ANYTHING and Climate Change: Difficult (192 comments)

no one exploited it, but that hasnt stopped you idiots from claiming they have.
in fact scientists went out of their way to do the opposite.

2 days ago
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9th Circuit Will Revisit "Innocence of Muslims" Takedown Order

dywolf Re:Why anti-Muslim posts have to be anonymous (158 comments)

So what you're saying youre scared of internet tough guys?
most threats are from cowards who will never do anything.
the fact that some people do it while claiming to be muslims doesnt make them special, so why do you run in fear and treat it any differently than any other person making anonymous threats?

And lets get something straight here: calling someone a "muslim lover" is part of what makes you a bigotted scumbag.
I'm no more a muslim lover than I am a christian lover, atheist lover, or race lover, or trans lover, or gay lover, or stright lover, or any other epithet you want to throw my way.

Acknowledging a group's right to equal existence under the law doesnt make one a lover of something.
Nor does it imply support for the few fanatical extremists you try to paint all them as.

It simply makes one a supporter of Liberty, Freedom, and Justice, for All. You know, those American Ideals we claim to believe in?
Something of us actually do believe in them unequivocably, without reservation, and without putting an asterisk at the end and adding the words "except muslims" or "for white christians only".

2 days ago

Submissions

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America's Internet is the Best, Europe's a failure, says Washington DC Expert

dywolf dywolf writes  |  about a year ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "Harry Alford, the CEO of the NBCC in Washington, D.C., has written that that America's Internet is the best in the world. "85% of Americans enjoy 100MBps internet, blowing away Europe where only 50 percent of households can access even one-third of that speed". And not only is our system the envy of the world, thanks to the deregulations of the Clinton Era telecommunications reforms and the free market, but Europe's internet access is a complete failure due to overregulation. "It's why America's Internet is faster than in leading Eurpean nations. The greatest Internet companies in the world — from Amazon to Facebook — are American companies. We should stick with the free-market system that's worked so well.""
Link to Original Source
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CEO of National Black Chamber of Congress says America's Internet is the Best

dywolf dywolf writes  |  about a year ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "Harry Alford, the CEO of the National Black Chamber of Congress in Washington, D.C., wrote into The Oklahoman newspaper to rebut a previous letter to the editor decrying the stat of America's Internet. He tells tell us not to fear, that America's Internet is the best in the world. Apparently "85% of Americans enjoy 100MBps internet, blowing away Europe where only 50 percent of households can access even one-third of that speed". And not only is our system the envy of the world, thanks to the deregulations of the Clinton Era telecommunications reforms, but Europe's internet access is a complete failure due to overregulation. The letter can be found here: http://newsok.com/free-market-system-worked-for-americas-internet/article/3879006"
Link to Original Source
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Writer extols crowd sourced crime solving...while ignoring it's failure

dywolf dywolf writes  |  about a year and a half ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "Gary C. Kessler, a contributor to CNN Opinion, has written a piece in which he extols the virtues of crowdsourcing, and how it helped capture the Bostom bombers....except for that part where crowdsourcing failed to indentity the real suspects, and actually led to some false accusations. He then goes on to talk about the privacy issues involved in constant public surveillance. From the article: "The Boston Marathon bombing investigation made use of crowdsourcing to collect photos and video from cell phones and surveillance cameras at an unprecedented level. These pictures were made public a little more than 72 hours after the explosions and the second suspect was arrested 29 hours later.
[...]
The U.S. Constitution does not explicitly offer citizens a right of privacy, although many court decisions certainly support such an ideal. Indeed, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis is well known for his observation, 'The right to be left alone — the most comprehensive of rights, and the right most valued by a free people.'""

Link to Original Source
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Hostess, maker of Twinkies, to shutdown

dywolf dywolf writes  |  more than 2 years ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "In a shocking and disturbing bit of news Hostess, unable to work out a new contract with its bakers who are striking, has filed for bankrupty and requested permission from the court to shutdown operations. The world's most perfect food in the upcoming apocalypse may disappear as the Twinkie supply dwindles."
Link to Original Source
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Electronic Arts pulls Bait and Switch with FIFA 13

dywolf dywolf writes  |  more than 2 years ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "Electronic Arts has released FIFA 13. The problem? It's FIFA 12 with a new box. Same graphics, same modes, literally the same everything. Other than new socks for your players."
Link to Original Source
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Indian Superbug gene found in American cat

dywolf dywolf writes  |  more than 2 years ago

dywolf (2673597) writes "The NDM-1 story has been long and contentious (my archive of posts is here), but from the first, two things have been clear. However the political battles fall out, medicine views the emergence of this gene as a catastrophe, because it edges organisms to the brink of being completely non-responsive to antibiotics, as untreatable as if the infections were contracted before the antibiotic era began. And because the gene resides in organisms that happily live in the gut without causing symptoms, NDM-1 has been a hidden catastrophe, crossing borders and entering hospitals without ever being detected."
Link to Original Source

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