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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

edmudama Re:What about secure data erasure? (438 comments)

Erases can fail, but that's typically a gross failure in the peripheral circuitry and not a cell-level/array-level problem. It's no different than you being unable to erase your data if you have a mechanical failure on a rotation drive.

Your most likely "leakage" case is with a grown defect or a change in the flash translation layer, however, the specs are written so those old locations must be erased by a secure erase command. I know that based on NAND physics, if you do that erase, the data is gone and never coming back. IMO, there really aren't enough electrons in a charge well to reliably encode "additional" information about the prior state of a bit following an erase.

An NSA hack is always possible where they install rogue firmware on the drive that doesn't actually secure erase properly, but that kind of argument/speculation is outside the scope of my answer.

about a month ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

edmudama Re:Spinning storage is king... (438 comments)

Dual-E5 Xeon systems will get you 80 lanes of Gen3 PCIe.

NVMe was invented to work around controller bandwidth and latency issues that you mention, thus getting you full "link" speed into your database

about a month ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

edmudama Re:Really? (438 comments)

That was true over 3Gbit/s SATA perhaps, but hasn't been true for a while now.

A single PCIe SSD in a 2.5" form factor can move sequential data at 2.5GB/s or better (Gen3 x4). Modern rotating drives cap out somewhere around 200MB/s if I remember correctly, even on 6Gbit/s SATA or SAS links. That means that for sequential IO, you need 12 rotating drives to match the performance of one SSD. For random reads (700K/s on the latest samsung) you need 5800 rotating drives (assuming 120 IOPS from the rotating disk). Note that would require a queue depth of almost 700,000 which is impossible from an application standpoint. In reality, your pool of 5800 rotating drives will be MUCH slower.

about a month ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

edmudama Re:LOL (438 comments)

At the largest of the large sizes, hard drives will likely stay behind rotation for another decade when only considering cost.

However, if you don't need terabytes of fast storage, we've already crossed the threshold where SSDs are cheaper.

Smallest hard drives you can buy these days are $60 new and store 500GB. That same $60 gets you a 128GB SSD from a "Tier 1" manufacturer (Samsung, Intel, Micron/Crucial, Sandisk, Toshiba)

For just about any storage application that fits in ~100GB or less, SSDs are both cheaper and more reliable TODAY than rotating drives.

That 100GB crossover threshold with the cheapest rotating drives will double every year or so, since today's rotating drive prices are almost completely based on the cost of the electronics and a single head/single platter mechanical system. You can't make a rotation drive significantly cheaper than today, but with each generation of SSD they can halve the number of NAND packages, shrink the PCBA, build controllers with fewer channels, etc.

about a month ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

edmudama Re:What about long-term data integrity? (438 comments)

If they're following industry standards, the typical guarantee on client drives is that your data will be available for 1 year of 60C bake assuming you've already cycled it to the endurance limit.

If your temperature is cooler or you haven't used up all your cycles yet, then retention will be longer than the guarantee.

Enterprise drives trade retention for endurance, thus allowing them to support more write cycles within their warranty periods. The trade-off is that the endurance limit at 60C becomes 3 months instead of 12 months, which for typical enterprise applications is more than enough. Note that when powered up but idle, the drive is performing management of the NAND, so the retention numbers are all assuming that the drive is powered off and in storage.

about a month ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

edmudama Re:Wait? For how long? (438 comments)

I'd mod you up if I had points.

Intel's X25-M was introduced in late 2008 at $1000 for 80GB ($12.50/GB), and was hard to get demand was so high.

You can currently buy enterprise-grade SSDs from multiple vendors for about $0.65/GB, with failure rates that are a fraction of 1%, and they're ten times faster (random IO) than the X25-M was.

about a month ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

edmudama Re:Intel & Micron (438 comments)

The Numonyx venture was specifically for NOR flash manufacturing.

IMFT (Intel Micron Flash Technologies) is the NAND partnership between Intel and Micron.

about a month ago
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High School Student Builds Gun That Unlocks With Your Fingerprint

edmudama Re:Great one more fail (600 comments)

3rd party barrel/chamber? Hard to blame glock for that one.

about 3 months ago
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High School Student Builds Gun That Unlocks With Your Fingerprint

edmudama Re: Great one more fail (600 comments)

I have another problem with it.

Anyone who cares about their own safety doesn't carry a firearm without a chambered round. If you think that in a real incident you'll have time to draw and rack the slide to chamber a round, you're mistaken.

about 3 months ago
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Low-Carb Diet Trumps Low-Fat Diet In Major New Study

edmudama Re:What they don't tell you (588 comments)

Yea. The obesity epidemic in the US correlates strongly to the publication of our food pyramid recommendations by the USDA.

Prior to that, obesity affected a very small number of people in the US.

about 4 months ago
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Low-Carb Diet Trumps Low-Fat Diet In Major New Study

edmudama Re: What they don't tell you (588 comments)

I'm guessing it was ineffective because most people don't realize how much sugar has been added to the foods they buy, and even relatively small amounts of added sugar break the premise of "slow carb" diets.

about 4 months ago
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Researchers Unveil Experimental 36-Core Chip

edmudama Re:Different Power Supply Voltage (143 comments)

That doesn't matter. The power supply surrounding the socket/pads will account for whatever Vcc needs to be.

about 6 months ago
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Intel's New Desktop SSD Is an Overclocked Server Drive

edmudama sequential transfer (111 comments)

Hard for any SATA drive to distinguish itself on sequential transfers, given that SATA is capped around 550MB/s

about 10 months ago
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ARM Researching Novel Chip Memory

edmudama Re: I love ARM (88 comments)

It's Proverbs 17:28

about a year ago
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Power-Loss-Protected SSDs Tested: Only Intel S3500 Passes

edmudama Re:soulskill, epic fail, another meaningless artic (293 comments)

In fairness, the author didn't specify the "class" of drive. He simply said 100 GBP or less, and storage didn't matter to him because his application needed less than 10GB per month of data collection.

about a year ago
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Power-Loss-Protected SSDs Tested: Only Intel S3500 Passes

edmudama Re:Right..... (293 comments)

The above is for laptop users. In data centers, sure, get the fastest IOPS... which depending on the interface, may be Intel.

about a year ago
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Power-Loss-Protected SSDs Tested: Only Intel S3500 Passes

edmudama Re:Right..... (293 comments)

So you'd rather have a 10W brick doing 300 IOPS, than a nice quiet reliable SSD pulling under 2 watts and doing 20,000 IOPS?

Intel may not be the fastest, but once you're above about 10-20k IOPS, all that matters is reliability.

about a year ago
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OCZ May Be On Its Last Legs

edmudama Re:Vertex 2 (292 comments)

In fairness, most vendors have this option.

You can either choose a 3/5 year warranty, and the drive will slow itself down to guarantee it lasts.

Or, you can choose to go by the "gas gauge" and your warranty may expire after 8 months or whatever of full-speed IO.

When you buy server-grade drives, they usually sell you a gas gauge model.

about a year ago
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"Synthetic Tracking" Makes It Possible to Find Millions of Near Earth Asteroids

edmudama Re:Is it just me? (101 comments)

Article doesn't have a good description.

My guess is you take a bunch of timelapse frames of the same sky.

Then you overlay them at offsets in different directions which would keep any moving objects in the same place.

Picture doing 36000 sequences of overlays:
360 degree variation in 0.1 degree increments at 10 different radial velocities

Most of those sequences will just show blurred gray washout, but if you happened to hit the right direction as a moving object at the right speed, your overlaid image sequence will effectively keep the moving object in the same spot of the frame, which will result in the average brightness for that pixel or pixles to be higher than the surrounding blurs.

Just a guess...

about a year ago

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