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Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

eggboard Re:tl;dr - it's just like a business (128 comments)

I spent many hours and many emails with a good accountant, and he advised me not to launch a Kickstarter late in the year! However, there was no better time, and I had to work around the cash-flow issue, as I describe.

The state taxation issue was my fault. I had, in fact, budgeted to spend *more* on tax than I actually owed. So I wouldn't have come up short. Based on my communication with the state, I expect that I would pay different rates on parts of the Kickstarter, and potentially pay up to about 5% to the state in tax. In the actual event, it was about 1.5%.

However, I should have better understand the issue of destination addresses so that I had properly collected that information from everyone. That's something that I've now heard from many other crowdfunding projects about, too.

Further, at least Washington State requires you pay in-state retail business and occupation tax plus sales tax on all sales for which you cannot account for the destination. That can be a huge tax bill.

about 5 months ago
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Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

eggboard Re:tl;dr - it's just like a business (128 comments)

Thanks, much! Really, I wrote the article in part as a public service, not to be full of myself, because so many people I know have these questions. I have some answers, lots of questions, and lots of places to point people for planning. The commenters here can be awful at times (some are great, thanks!), but they're dwarfed by the number of people who are reading the article.

about 5 months ago
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Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

eggboard Re:Medium (128 comments)

"aaaaand I'm guessing your compensation is at least partially based on clicks.": Our compensation is based on producing new content that people want to read; clickbait doesn't get us anywhere, because it doesn't turn into people reading the articles, but clicking and leaving. It also earns us anger, which doesn't help foster regular readers. Also, a 4,000-word article about tax issues is usually *not* traditional clickbait under any reasonable definition...

"That's nice, but you're not a lawyer or a tax attorney so my advice is to stop pretending like you are one before someone in a position of authority takes notice."

I love how people who didn't read the article out themselves so clearly!

about 5 months ago
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Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

eggboard Re:Cash vs accrual accounting (128 comments)

Absolutely correct in one regard, but some very large business also run on cash if don't make stuff that's inventoried.

I did research it (and mention it in the article) and discuss it with my accountant. Because the publication doesn't really qualify for accrual accounting, it would have invited scrutiny (or worse) had I switched to accrual to get advantageous accounting rules for a specific project.

about 5 months ago
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Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

eggboard Re:Deferred Revenue? (128 comments)

I researched this and discussed it with my accountant. My accountant said that switching cash-basis business to accrual for the sole purpose of deferring taxes for something that isn't part of its routine business could be met with scrutiny and penalties —and be disallowed.

And the IRS rules make it clear that you can't simply align revenue and expenses. It has a number of examples in which it's clear that in a Kickstarter, the revenue couldn't all be deferred, although the expenses might be allowed to be taken in 2013 if contracts were signed and other tests made.

about 5 months ago
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Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

eggboard Re:tl;dr - it's just like a business (128 comments)

Thanks, TheGavster! For me, I had sufficient cash flow and overall income from the main business relative to the size of the Kickstarter that we could have weathered it if we hadn't had a perfect alignment as we did.

I don't mean to sound totally hapless. I had put a reserve of cash away for taxes and estimated *too high* for the state taxes as it turned out. But I didn't plan as thoroughly as I should have, and I have seen this bite a lot of other people I know, too.

about 5 months ago
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Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

eggboard Re:Medium (128 comments)

If it's interesting and useful, and I submit it under my name, and it gets posted to the home page by people with full awareness, it seems like you're engaging in meta-moderation within a thread.

I don't post B.S. to Slashdot; I've been using it since it started (not under this ID at the very beginning). The moderators and other tools prevent useless stuff from rising to the top.

So.

about 5 months ago
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Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

eggboard Re:Context (128 comments)

I completely understand that! But it's difficult to say "clickbait" if you haven't visited the site.

Medium is no panacea, and this is a period when they're spending money to figure stuff out before they plug in a revenue pipe (see public statements by Ev Williams). However, you're seeing a ton of links to Medium because it's got a great front-end for writing and publishing. I've been working with Web-based content-management systems (CMSes) and sadly wrote a few myself for nearly 18 years, since the first formal ones arose. And Medium is pretty fantastic for writers and publishers.

I think it's very good for readers, because it doesn't have cruft. It's words, no ads, photos/video well presented. So people have raced to write there if they don't want to use blogging software because it's just the story.

Yes, there are a lot of SEO marketing types writing stuff at Medium. But there's a lot of good work (not tooting my own horn as I'm about 0.001% of the content of Medium) that's there, too.

about 5 months ago
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Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

eggboard Re:Medium (128 comments)

It's difficult to claim "clickbait" when there are no ads!

I wrote the article in this link, and edit a publication called The Magazine. Medium pays us to write new content and post archived material from our publication to their site while they learn about what people read. They're looking at a lot of data (which anyone who uses the site, even as a blog platform, can see in the stats page) to figure out whether people read entire articles, etc.

I wrote 4,000 words from months of dealing with tax and business issues related to Kickstarter. I didn't realize that would be considered *thrilling clickbait headlines*. Instead, I though Slashdot readers, among others, would be a likely audience working in and around crowdfunding, and might like to get some information before launching one about the tax and accounting side of things.

The "multiuser blog" is a collection of related articles, some of them run by publications like mine.

about 5 months ago
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Marc Andreessen On Why Bitcoin Matters (And A Critique)

eggboard Re:Criticisms Are Largely Off The Mark (332 comments)

On fees: fees are generally charged, but they are tiny. However, all those involved in Bitcoin (including miners and software developers I spoke with) know that fees will rise and mechanisms are being created to make that simpler. The production of Bitcoins will halve in 2016, and miners are, over time, expected to derive the rewards that drive investment and operation of the system's functions (operating nodes, mining, "burying" transactions in the block chain, all interrelated) from fees rather than coins.

If you read Andreessen's piece and my essay, you'll see that he properly discusses essentially counterfeit payment from one party to another, but doesn't address fraudulent payment and the infrastructure to ensure that the party paying owns the funds used to pay. That is, if Bitcoins are stolen and used to pay for goods, a merchant faces the same trouble as if cash were stolen and used to pay. Except cash can be untraceable, and Bitcoin transactions can be tracked, even if the party isn't directly known who engaged in the transaction. Law enforcement could prove funds are stolen even if they can't recover the goods or services purchased with the funds, and clawback the funds from the seller/merchant.

None of that is addressed in Andreessen's essay, in which he proposes that Bitcoin by having very low or no fees on Bitcoin-to-Bitcoin transactions removes the necessity for any per-transaction fees as are charged to deal with fraud and overhead in a credit-card system.

Most merchants are going to be more likely to deal with an intermediary Bitcoin operator who will handle transactions on their behalf and charge a fee for chargebacks and theft recovery.

about 6 months ago
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802.11ac: Better Coverage, But Won't Hit Advertised Speeds

eggboard Re:And this is news? (107 comments)

Now, c'mon, grizzled veteran (like myself?).

The point of this article, which I wrote, is both to inform people of the practical aspects of 802.11ac, and also to deal with the disappointment. Average users, to whom these products are marketed in sound bites, may be upgrading because they think "faster is better!" This is to provide a realistic case for what 802.11ac will offer in Apple's version (and everyone's).

about a year ago
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802.11ac: Better Coverage, But Won't Hit Advertised Speeds

eggboard Re:wasteful on spectrum (107 comments)

Outdated opinion on 5 GHz. The channels 149 and higher can broadcast at 20 times the signal strength of channels 36 to 48, and Apple and others have been boosting power progressively over the years. I can see it around me in my home and the last office I had: you can see a lot of 5 GHz now because of newer devices, where before, I only saw 2.4 GHz. That's anecdote, but fire up iStumbler or a Windows equivalent (aircrack-ng?) and see what I mean.

about a year ago
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Throwing Light On Elcomsoft's Analysis of Smartphone Password Managers

eggboard Re:WTH (48 comments)

I'm never sure if Slashdot commenters read the original article or the blurb.

In the article, which I wrote, I explain the precise degree of risk, who is at risk, and how to mitigate.

* Recommending software: I did not write the article about 1Password Pro; Joe Kissell did.

* I do not receive a share of advertising revenue, nor is any my writing for any of many publications based on advertising revenue. I receive a fixed fee arranged in advance. Only the publication knows whether or not advertising was justified.

* Attacked on his income: Neither the publication TidBITS or me personally have any income issues associated with the sale of any security software.

This article was for normal folks, not security experts, and tried to explain in clear terms how to disable (for instance) any PIN-based access or switch away from a numbers-only passwords.

The criticism here seems both misplaced, conspiracy oriented, and not based on a reading of the article.

more than 2 years ago
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A New Wi-Fi Exploit, Limited But Clever

eggboard Re:TKIP and CCMP (77 comments)

1. If you're having trouble with WPA2, it's an implementation issue. There's no reason that WPA2 shouldn't work as well or better than WPA. In some silicon, AES-CCMP encryption can work faster than TKIP. Check for firmware upgrades on adapters and APs.

2. TKIP keys cannot be extracted by any known methods. Short TKIP and AES-CCMP passphrased-based keys are vulnerable to brute-force dictionary attacks, typically based on precomputed common SSIDs. A key of 10 or more characters is probably fine; 20 random characters is beyond computation in this universe. 63 is just silly.

3. The TKIP exploits are particular to AES-CCMP and don't recover the key, nor does any particular key length prevent the exploit. The exploits rely on a set of givens (such as 802.11e/WMM being available and enabled on a router), but this latest exploit that I link to uses the integrity checksum to extract a packet delivered to a client in the right circumstances.

4. This attack could be weaponized, but it's a proximity attack, so the yield is very very low in such attacks.

more than 4 years ago
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A New Wi-Fi Exploit, Limited But Clever

eggboard Re:TKIP and CCMP (77 comments)

That comment is halfway between troll and truth.

That only works for short passwords using dictionary words and common alternatives--typically eight characters or fewer. Yes, you can get precomputed dictionaries for common SSIDs, and you can even use a new service to do some computation.

However, move to 9 characters of random text (&fa^g_!80) and a unique SSID ("My little pony's network"), and all bets are off to computing the result in anything like a usable period of time.

TKIP and AES-CCMP remain strong for long, strong passwords, long being 10 or more characters, but 12 to 20 is best.

more than 4 years ago
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A New Wi-Fi Exploit, Limited But Clever

eggboard Re:Very Limited (77 comments)

That's not as limited as it sounds. There are perhaps hundreds of millions of routers running versions of embedded Linux, and WMM/802.11e may be enabled by default on many of those!

more than 4 years ago
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Is City-Wide Wi-Fi a Dead Idea?

eggboard Year-old Ars Technica piece covers similar ground (259 comments)

I wrote a long article for Ars Technica nearly a year ago that looked at the past, present, and future. The reality hasn't changed much since then.

Most so-called municipal Wi-Fi projects involved a handful of companies absorbing all the initial network cost in exchange for some to no city business and access to citizens for coverage. EarthLink, MetroFi, Kite, and AT&T were the most prominent. EarthLink got out of the business; AT&T still does some metro-scale networking (Riverside), and MetroFi and Kite shut down.

There are a ton of networks run entirely or nearly so for public safety and/or municipal purposes that have been very successfully in Oklahoma City and elsewhere.

more than 4 years ago
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New iPod Touch Has an 802.11n Chip

eggboard Re:Wait a Minute Here... (135 comments)

The final standard simply confirms what's been shipping in the market in largely unchanged form for over two years. The Wi-Fi Alliance has been certifying devices against a stable draft since 2007. There's no such thing as "pre-standard" devices in this category. Either they have a Wi-Fi seal for Draft N or they don't.

more than 4 years ago
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New iPod Touch Has an 802.11n Chip

eggboard Link to stories (135 comments)

Sorry, I didn't properly include the link.

My analysis about how the 802.11n stuff works related to an iPod touch, such as explaining what single-stream 802.11n means as a media server is here at TidBITS. The iFixIt tear down is here.

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

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Minecraft Play Videos Sweep in Cash

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 4 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "Minecraft YouTube videos are fantastically popular, and a core group of producers of these videos have enjoyed a wild ride up the virtual charts. Diamond Minecart, a YouTube channel by 22-year-old Daniel Middleton of Northamptonshire, England, has almost 1.9 million subscribers, and people have watched his videos over 400 million times.

Joseph Garrett of Portsmouth, England, records himself as "Stampy," and has passed 2 million subscribers and 708 million views. The Daily Mail estimates that his channel currently grosses anywhere from $88,000 to $880,000 a month. A less-watched channel with 140,000 subscribers brings in $5,000 to $10,000 a month.

What's the appeal in watching someone play Minecraft? They are a way for kids to learn not only how to play the game but also how to modify it in almost endless combinations. It also brings them into a community of Minecraft players and turns something that can be an individual activity into something social."

Link to Original Source
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The hacker-activist community leaves no safe place for women. Can it grow up?

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 5 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "Rosie J. Spinks writes about the experience of women in the hacking and hacking/activism communities, where harassment, intimidation, sexualization, and patronization try to relegate them to the sidelines. Some just up and leave.

She writes: "Nowhere is evidence of this anti-female ethos easier to find than in the Internet’s most high-profile and highly organized subverters: the hacktivist group Anonymous. Anonymous’s roots lie in the profane message board known as 4chan, where jokes about rape, porn, and homosexuality are for nothing other than the “Lulz,” or gratuitous laughs. When 4chan factions morphed into Anonymous, the entity gradually gained a political activist-minded consciousness.

"Anonymous has always been a shifting entity, defined by whoever decides to participate on any given day, making proper accountability nearly impossible. Using devious tactics and a middle-school sense of humor (such as sending hundreds of unpaid-for pizzas to a target’s address), the amorphous group carries out a diverse range of well-publicized actions (or “AnonOps”), such as targeting the Church of Scientology’s Dianetics hotline or impinging on the operations of PayPal after it suspended payments to Internet messiah Julian Assange’s Wikileaks.""

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CoderDojo clubs help kids teach themselves to program

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 5 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "An Irish programmer started with a club in Cork to teach (at no cost) kids aged 5 to 17 how to program. It was such a hit that it's expanded to hundred of cities across 27 countries. CoderDojo has a template that includes self-directed learning with mentors on tap to help out. The notion is to provide kids a productive outlet. Among its successes is an average participation split about halfway between girls and boys in most chapters."
Link to Original Source
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The diaries of an early 20th-century "radium hound" reveal dangers that lurk

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 5 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "A responsible dealer of the radioactive element radium, a substance once pushed widely as a quack cure, tried to keep the genie in the bottle. Theresa Everline explains that in the first half of the 20th century, Frank Hartman, known as the Radium Hound, kept track of accidents and incompetence in handling radium. His diaries reveal that radium lingers in forgotten places."
Link to Original Source
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Eggs terminate! Egg-free flu vaccines provide faster pandemic response

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 5 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "Jen A. Miller has an egg allergy of a variety that her doctor has told her could produce a severe reaction if she were vaccinated for the flu, as flu vaccines are grown from viral strains incubated in chicken eggs. But, she explains, two new approaches have been approved by the FDA and are in production that don't use eggs at all; they're on the market in small amounts already, but will be available in much larger quantities soon. It's not just about egg allergies: the new vaccine types (one relying in insect proteins and the other on animal proteins) provide a much faster turnaround time in response to flu pandemics — as little as two to three months from isolation of a strain to mass production instead of at least six months with eggs."
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Kicktaxing: the crazy complexity of paying tax correctly on crowdfunding

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 5 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "I thought I knew what I was doing when I budgeted for a Kickstarter campaign. I spent weeks sorting out details, set a number ($48,000) that included expenses, Kickstarter fees, and a margin of error. In the end, we raised over $56,000. But my tax planning nearly put a crimp in cash flow, and could have been real problem. It all worked out, but I've written a detailed guide for people for before and after a campaign to avoid my mistakes."
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The anti-selfie: a slow, antique photographic process doesn't let you hide

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 6 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "A tintype is a form of wet-plate collodion photography, which requires exposing a metal plate covered in fluid chemicals within a short period of time after applying the emulsion. The process is receptive only to blue light, which tends to emphasize wrinkles and capillaries. The results are both gorgeous and unforgiving, the opposite of the selfie that tries to blur, hide, or present the subject in the best light. It may be old fashioned, but more and more shops have sprung up to offer slow photography. One in San Francisco has produced piles of prints, but is shutting down as its owners pursue other endeavors."
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Contracept-apps

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 6 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "There are a bunch of apps that help women (and their partners) manage fertility, to make it easier to conceive a child. But Natali Morris, the mother of two and planning no more, explains that they can be used for the opposite: contraception through careful measurement of vital statistics. For now, she'd rather avoid devices, hormones, and surgeries, and is using an app instead. It requires commitment and the scientific method, but it's not a quack idea; it conforms with modern knowledge of fertility cycles."
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Scott McNulty casts a spell of +10 confidence

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 6 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "Scott McNulty has found that his decades of playing Dungeons & Dragons took him, a natural introvert, out of his shell rather than giving him an excuse to stay inside it. For Scott, like many of us who played and play D&D and other roleplaying games, he built his comfort level with other people when he can don a different mantle (whether paladin or a mage betrayer who sold his soul to the devil)."
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Disabled Britons build campaign on Twitter about disability cuts

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 6 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "If you can't easily leave the house for days, or even your bed, it might be hard to help spread the word that the funds that literally allow you to stay alive and function are likely to be taken away with little recourse. Two women (among many people) in the UK use Twitter and other social media to rally people online and for rallies to explain how the Tory-led government's new testing programs for disability will drop hundreds of thousands of people who are incapable of working at all or full time. (There's some fraud, of course, but the program is designed to cut deserving and healthy alike.)"
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How Role-Playing Games Arrived in Japan with Black Onyx

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 6 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "Henk Rogers was a Dutchman who arrived in Japan in the 1980s following a girlfriend (later, his wife). An inveterate D&D player, he became enthralled with the NEC-8801, and nearly killed himself trying to create a D&D-like world that he released as The Black Onyx. No one initially knew what to make of it, and the game sold slowly at first. Through savvy pricing, packaging, and press attention, sales grew, and the game jumpstarted RPGs in Japan. Rogers got left behind, though, as Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy hit a local nerve better than his efforts. "I also realized that I didn’t quite understand the Japanese aesthetic and way. These games were quite different to mine, and just struck a more effective cultural chord.” Rogers went on to license Tetris to Nintendo, though, so he did just fine."
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Public libraries tinker with offering makerspaces

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 6 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "Public libraries are starting to build temporary and permanent labs that let patrons experiment with new arts, crafts, and sciences, many of them associated with the maker movement. It's a way to bring this technology and training to those without the money or time to join makerspaces or buy gear themselves. It seems to extend the mission of libraries to educate, inform, and enrich, but is a seemingly rare move in the direction of teaching people to create for pleasure and professionally. Many libraries are experimenting with experimenting."
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Fixing broken links with the Internet Archive

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 6 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "The Internet Archive has copies of Web pages corresponding to 378 billion URLs. It's working on several efforts, some of them quite recent, to help deter or assist with link rot, when links go bad. Through an API for developers, WordPress integration, a Chrome plug-in, and a JavaScript lookup, the Archive hopes to help people find at least the most recent copy of a missing or deleted page. More ambitiously, they instantly cache any link added to Wikipedia, and want to become integrated into browsers as a fallback rather than showing a 404 page."
Link to Original Source
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Rebutting Andreessen's Bitcoin Dreams

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 6 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "Marc Andreessen wrote an essay in the New York Times that appeared today, in which he tried to make the case for Bitcoin going mainstream for payments, if not as a currency. After comparing Bitcoin to the rise of personal computers and the Internet, he tries to explain how it eliminates fraud and will solve global money transfers and the plight of the unbanked. I wrote a critique of these and other points in his essay:

Bitcoin doesn’t eliminate fraudulent transactions; it only eliminates counterfeit payments. This can, of course, save many tens or hundreds of billions of dollars a year globally and translate to more efficiency in commerce. But removing the intermediary also removes recourse outside of courts, and the cost and nature of that can’t be determined."

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Paging Dr. MacGyver: maker movement comes to medical gear

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 7 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "The tools to make crafts, electronics prototypes, and cool stuff have started rapidly to turn to medical gear, especially in developing nations. The early results are quite marvelous, but there are a ton of concerns, too. The pace of change is incredibly fast:

[Many people] without any without any formal medical training—can take advantage of access to global supply chains, cutting-edge medical knowledge, and recent leaps in design and fabrication technology that have made the prototyping process faster, cheaper, and simpler than ever before. Even as concerns about safety and liability are only starting to be addressed, medical inventors and other technical tinkerers are already improving and saving lives—sometimes their own.

"

Link to Original Source
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Penny Arcade offers offensive, low-paying IT job with great benefits

eggboard eggboard writes  |  about 8 months ago

eggboard (315140) writes "Penny Arcade wants to hire one IT person to do four jobs, and is looking for someone with a terrible work/life balance to be paid poorly because the company isn't money-focused. This isn't unusual for an IT job, of course, especially at a small company. But Penny Arcade rakes in millions from its webcomics, PAX conventions, games, and more, and says the job's benefits will outweigh the low salary. But did they mention you need to be able to work in an "offensive environment"? Yes, they did. Sounds perfect for the right person."
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NY Times Biffs Conference Wi-FAIL Story

eggboard eggboard writes  |  more than 3 years ago

eggboard (315140) writes "The New York Times ran a strange story that tried to explain why Wi-Fi fails when thousands of people gathered a tech event try to use a network set up by organizers. The story says Wi-Fi wasn't designed for that kind of use. I disagree, and explain why at length. The 1999 IEEE 802.11b spec might not have been designed for it, but 802.11g could handle mass numbers, and 802.11n is designed to deal with interference and large user bases."
Link to Original Source
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iPhone 4 May Have Wi-Fi Driver Fault

eggboard eggboard writes  |  more than 4 years ago

eggboard (315140) writes "After examining the WWDC video and talking to two veteran Wi-Fi experts, it seems likely that the iPhone 4 has a Wi-Fi driver flaw that was part of the trouble in making a network connection during Steve Job's WWDC keynote. The other problem was the massive congestion caused by so many independent access points. (Congestion may have triggered the iPhone 4's troubles, too.) With mobile hotspots proliferating on phones and in portable devices like the MiFi, we're going to see more trouble in the future."
Link to Original Source
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Another Limited but Wi-Fi Exploit

eggboard eggboard writes  |  more than 4 years ago

eggboard (315140) writes "Martin Beck, who in 2008 co-wrote a paper describing a way to inject packets into a secured Wi-Fi system, is back with a more extensive exploit. His "Enhanced TKIP Michael Attacks" still doesn't allow extraction of a key, and is limited to TKIP (not AES-CCMP) WPA-protected networks. Still, he's figured out how to put in large payloads, and to extract data sent from an access point to a client--all without cracking the network key. The attack requires proximity to sniff and inject data, but it's another crack in the older key standard (TKIP) that no one with serious security interests should still use."
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Apple Slips in 450 Mbps Wi-Fi in Its Base Station

eggboard eggboard writes  |  more than 4 years ago

eggboard (315140) writes "Apple told a few reporters in briefings yesterday to look for significant changes in its two top-line base station models, which are noted in passing as "new" on the product pages: 50 percent throughput improvement and 25 percent distance bump. How did they do this? With Engadget's FCC tip about "3x3" models, I've determined that Apple now offers what seems to be the first mass-market 450 Mbps, three radio-chain Wi-Fi router. Virtually all other consumer routers max out at 300 Mbps."
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