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Launching 2015: a New Certificate Authority To Encrypt the Entire Web

ememisya Re:quick question (210 comments)

I don't believe any "burried deep within your cables" type organization would require this sort of access. It's a lot easier to exploit some kind of a firmware vulnerability and download the private key to the CA, or simply VNC into the target user's machine to see the requested data before it was encrypted. This is to keep out private hackers, organized hackers, wealthy hackers etc. The government will always have access to your data, well since they tend to have tanks the persuation tends to be unmatchable. The turn of the tide for our century is to see if the governments who do have such access will show equal attention to everyone rather than be in favor of economics, lets be honest having access to all of someone's data immediately tends to reduce respect to that person, objectifying them. This is the culture which is really the root of all the privacy issues. I think ultimately we need to rebrand the NSA err I mean shut down the NSA. Because truly, nobody is watching your computer... O_O ... That's the point, when you KNOW someone is watching, it screws up the whole experience.

When something's strange, in your computer, who you gonna call? Momentarily the answer is, "Tough luck" We've been talking about a "government layer" within the network stack (jokingly at first) for decades. As it is however, the world has a major respect issue between authority and economically disadvantaged. It's really a very complex issue. But I'd say the only good way out is read-only access, which doesn't exist, by highly trained (and hopefully paid) employees who just don't exist.

If you're asking, isn't that the case today anyways? The answer is no, there are 0 checks and balances, apparently. In that, a family was raided (agents boxed in their cars), and interrogated because they Googled, "pressure cooker". Heads of such agencies lied to the Congress, in public, and nobody cared. There is this feeling that there are no consequences to invading people's privacy, whereas it should be jail time for the officials. You see? That's the issue with respect, the person who is watching isn't intimidated at all into peering over a person's private life.

about a week ago
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Machine Learning Used To Predict Military Suicides

ememisya Re:The New Magic (74 comments)

Agreed :) Talk about reducing the total entropy of a human being into a few gigs of storage space and organized LEDs.

about a week ago
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Machine Learning Used To Predict Military Suicides

ememisya Re:The New Magic (74 comments)

I completely understand you. It's fairly normal to feel suicidal at least once in your life, it reiterates the fact of mortality and lets people sort out their priorities given a finite amount of time creates the concept of things being precious. The point I was trying to make was if people are in a fairly good mood, and all their friends start talking about suicide all of a sudden, it might sway their thoughts to a darker zone where none existed before. It's just how we tend to consume information and generate opinions based on it. I guess in short my point is assumption, is the mother of all fuck ups.

about a week ago
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Launching 2015: a New Certificate Authority To Encrypt the Entire Web

ememisya Re:CAcert (210 comments)

It really has much to do with the people involved in the security groups for the popular browsers. I have a feeling EFF, Cisco, Mozilla and Akamai are big enough names to push this through to production.

about a week ago
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Comcast Kisses-Up To Obama, Publicly Agrees On Net Neutrality

ememisya The Internet IS a utility. (258 comments)

... it just doesn't want to go the utility route...

I'm sorry Comcast, but no. You can be like Atmos, that's about it. A good percentage of people don't have any other service such as phone or maybe even access to their homes without the Internet, we even check the time through the Internet. I sincerely hope POTUS doesn't succumb to this sly public Comcast facade.

about two weeks ago
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Machine Learning Used To Predict Military Suicides

ememisya Re:The New Magic (74 comments)

Statistically (well let's call it machine learning analysis for the sake of the article) the military has always been impressed by electronics, and there seems to be this trend of amazement at Big Data, given the amount of signals being collected in any given military institution processed through iteratively data adjusted logic gates. I admit it's pretty cool, but it makes a fatal assumption, heuristic analysis is always correct. Take the case of someone who wasn't suicidal, fits the criteria of "he who must be suicidal", if everyone within the community of this person starts treating them like they're suicidal, well that might make them suicidal. I just hope all they do is send a pamphlet otherwise I feel for the non-married 27 year-olds in the military.

about two weeks ago
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New Book Argues Automation Is Making Software Developers Less Capable

ememisya Making Programmers Lazy? (212 comments)

Firstly, programmers are lazy by design. That's a good thing because that means energy efficiency, which also equates to better algorithms in the pattern of thought (that's why we have coffee, to move a lazy programmer into coding). Does automation make a programmer lazy? Not if they practice both. At home as a hobby, open up a Hex Editor and code with directly inputting 0s and 1s like a real man! At work, use your IDE's bean generators and the like, the key point being, as long as you are not helpless when the automation doesn't function as it should.

about two weeks ago
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President Obama Backs Regulation of Broadband As a Utility

ememisya Mr. President Obama (706 comments)

*salutes*

about two weeks ago
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Is Public Debate of Trade Agreements Against the Public Interest?

ememisya Re:Misleading summary (219 comments)

There is a public debate. Every citizen of the Campaign-funding Corporations of America has the ability to vote, through their elected Lobbyists.

Oh, wait... now I see. Whoever submitted the story was referring to the form of government that the U.S. had around 1800.

Here's the rule of thumb, if it's a long term decision (in this case forever) it MUST be as public as possible. If it's a short term decision, do it behind closed doors it's going to fade anyhow. Evils to watch out for:

First one, "short term decisions re-extended forever" (That's a long term decision, much like, "Okay, this is my last drink..." next day "Okay this is my last drink" years later "Damn! My liver!")

The second one, "long term decisions unenforced" (That's a short term decision, much like, "Meh, I'll get to that pile of laundry tomorrow. Do we even need to do laundry?")

Real world example on the second one from history would be the Secularism rule, "Don't mix religion and government!" The Shah of Iran gets toppled, Ayatollah Khomeini brings about religious rule. Country goes from Weekly fashion magazines for women to women must cover up wherever they go in public (punished by whipping) and eventually pregnant women shot in the streets. You don't want public whippings in your country, keep it rational (Oh and compensate your employees well).

Real world example on the first one from history would be (most recently the Patriot Act) Mobarak of Egypt. Okay this will be my best term as elected president! Erm, I'm gonna need another term. You don't want a totalitarian government (see Mussolini) don't indulge so permanently, nor describe the total life goals of a nation, whether out in public or in secret.

Now, coming back to The Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP), America (and most other technologically literate countries) have already decided that we want no part in this through SOPA and PIPA reactions. We want our Internet roaming free like the Buffalo. But seeing as how https//www.information.com turned into http//$$$.your_private_information.buy I don't see any realistic way the people could have a say in it, unless our governments just suddenly decide to do the right thing. It would be nice. But why should they?

So the choice comes to anyone with a decent income as such, "Beat this dying horse to war, and double your money!" or "Do the right thing, but possibly lose money, like donating to a charity."

In this case it might be in the interest of eBay and Amazon type companies who simply need the Internet as a communication medium vs. companies like Facebook who'd like to know your mother's maiden name. The problem with that is, Amazon is also in the business of wanting to know your mom personally, as a profit on the side, since everybody does it.

I can see we're pretty much SOL.

about three weeks ago
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Reactions To Disgusting Images Predict a Persons Political Ideology

ememisya Re:Two things. (330 comments)

Third:

First:

Eighty-three healthy individuals (males/females = 41/42; age = 18â"62; mean [SD] = 29.0 [11.3] years) in Roanoke and Blacksburg, VA, area were recruited ...

Second:

They also completed a survey about their political beliefs, which included questions about their attitudes toward school prayer, gun control, immigration, and gay marriage.

So what would the results be if the recruits were from a more "Liberal" country?

That is the problem with these "studies". DO NOT look in your backyard for cases that support your bias. Look for cases that contradict your bias. Even if you have to look at the people in other countries. Particularly countries where there is less focus on the items that are controversial in the USofA.

Did you know that Blacksburg is an international college town? We have more Chinese and Indian people here than local Virginians depending on the year and semester. So the 18-30 is a global mix, 30-62 would most likely be the more "backyard" bias, although we also have locals from around the world, like Iranians, Turks, it's a fairly diverse town to represent a sampling of the planet.

They also completed a survey about their political beliefs, which included questions about their attitudes toward school prayer, gun control, immigration, and gay marriage.

Also you seemed to imply here that taking a survey of the people's political opinions is a negative? Well how else are they supposed to compare the results? I'm assuming in your mind simply doing the experiment and not checking to see if the correlation actually existed would be good enough?

about three weeks ago
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Can Ello Legally Promise To Remain Ad-Free?

ememisya FOR CRYING OUTLOUD!! (153 comments)

Just make a social networking site with no ads, no back alley sales, no access to anyone PERIOD! But you have to pay monthly subscription. Wouldn't you pay for a social networking site like a Netflix subscription for them to guarantee privacy? I would. Somebody patent this and be a billionaire already, chop chop!

about a month ago
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Ello Formally Promises To Remain Ad-Free, Raises $5.5M

ememisya Sign me up (167 comments)

Finally.

about a month ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is There an Ethical Way Facebook Can Experiment With Their Users?

ememisya Ethical way to experiment with users (141 comments)

I believe there is an ethical way for Facebook experiment with the feelings of the users. It starts with taking them out to a dinner and a movie, and you know, see how it goes from there on.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

ememisya Re: Listen to Sales - as hard as it may be (159 comments)

Yea, listen to sales indeed. It's only "dirty laundry" if you advertise it as such. Bug tracking systems are a collaborative medium where the world can help your product become more stable, and you're honest about what you overlooked. It's a win-win in the Tech world, but apparently a negative in the paranoid sales world.

about 2 months ago
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OKCupid Experiments on Users Too

ememisya Just Ask! (161 comments)

Firstly, I'm not convinced Facebook can be compared to OKCupid as far as their website identity is concerned.

I think the problem lies in the amount of uninformed experimentation in a given time period and how it effects the individual.

To some people, a barking dog at night is mental torture, or shining a light in someone's house really bothers them. Others can easily ignore lights and dogs and have a great night's sleep. It becomes an issue when a single individual who is bothered by it has to deal with 4 constant lights, 12 constantly barking dogs, and 1 person following you around scratching their nails on a chalk board all day (Got the phone app?). None of these sites bother to ask if anything bothers the user before testing it on them. Imagine the shittiest day you ever had, relative(s) died, lost that business deal, divorced all on the same day and say you also sat on your cat and smushed it.

You sit in front of Facebook and it starts reciting, "Nevermoore!" you might want to kill yourself, and Facebook would have been the last straw.

People don't expect such behavior from websites, because they misrepresent themselves. They keep these interactions as secrets, even porn sites have the decency to ask you, "Do you like man on man action?" before shoving a dong picture in front of your face.

about 4 months ago
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30% of Americans Aren't Ready For the Next Generation of Technology

ememisya Digitally Illiterate & Doesn't trust the Inter (191 comments)

I'm not sure how the two categories relate. One could be fairly digitally literate and still see no reason to "trust the Internet" a given country is running. Or as Geroge W. Bush put it, the Internets. (On an unrelated side note, I never knew how much of a visionary Dubya was, not only was the Internets comment correct in the future, so is the thought that if we went into Iraq today we'd be greeted as liberators. Man of the future that one.

about 5 months ago
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The Internet's Own Boy

ememisya Re:Internet bullies (194 comments)

If they can't even get a 3-year sentence to stick on an "uneducated, immature soccer mom", what chance do they have against high ranking officials that will be even harder to pin down anyway?

You nailed the issue on the head. The only solution to this is to guard your data and not allow government intrusion into people's lives. It may be legal to bully people to suicide or make them mad enough to break the law but the real issue is the ability of the government or any other corporate force to have easy access to one's Facebook, or cellphone data. This is why guarding your data is extremely important, to ward off against these kind of abuses. I think Aaron might have still been alive if the prosecutor didn't have access to Godly surveillence powers and an apparently infinite budget. (They took his Rock Band controller, seriously?) But believe me there is no money in doing the right thing, so the solution seems to be obvious, get rich (an option which is totally easy and available for everyone), or join a team of hackers... err surveillence experts. Either with 'em or against them, can't be left alone anymore. Also if you think this is just the U.S. you'd be wrong. All these X Eyes countries are following within the footsteps of turning the world into a large satellite dish, all in the benefit of a handful of individuals and illusion of safety. It's theatre, and you're in it.

about 5 months ago
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The Flaw Lurking In Every Deep Neural Net

ememisya Lifelike (230 comments)

AI modelled on us will only prove how flawed we really are.

about 6 months ago

Submissions

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Explicit Photos Were Often Shared at N.S.A

ememisya ememisya writes  |  about 4 months ago

ememisya (1548255) writes "“In the course of their daily work they stumble across something that is completely unrelated to their work, for example an intimate nude photo of someone in a sexually compromising situation but they’re extremely attractive,” he said. “So what do they do? They turn around in their chair and they show a co-worker. And their co-worker says: ‘Oh, hey, that’s great. Send that to Bill down the way.’ ”

The article also states Britain is often used as test grounds for privacy violation.

"... because in Britain the respect for individual privacy, he said, 'is not strongly encoded in law or policy.'

Because it has fewer restrictions, British intelligence platforms 'are used as a testing ground'""

Link to Original Source
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Understanding the Threats in Cyberspace

ememisya ememisya writes  |  1 year,28 days

ememisya (1548255) writes "In today's world of instant communication, our thoughts and needs are increasingly becoming digital signals over wired & wireless networks. Companies like Google, Microsoft, Apple, Twitter and Facebook we all trusted our data with as we moved to "the Cloud", began using our data for far more than just advertising. Things took a turn for the worse when government agencies like the NSA, instead of opposing, joined the trend, hard... Today it's our duty as people to understand the technology we interact with everyday and the security implications. One of the most brilliant minds of the world of cryptography Bruce Schneier explains the threats we all face in his latest essay, Understanding the Threats in Cyberspace [https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2013/10/understanding_t_2.html]"

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