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Comments

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Is Dolby Atmos a Flop For Home Theater Like 3DTV Was?

enharmonix Re:3dTV is a flop? (197 comments)

There's also lots of stats you can find out there that back up that not only do the cheaper non-3D ones sell better, but that when people do buy a 3D TV it wasn't the 3D feature they bought it for, and they didn't see it as a positive.

I always knew the majority of people didn't care about 3D, but I'd still like to think it's not going away anytime soon. Surely there's enough of a die-hard market that high-end TVs will still include a 3D option? I can only hope. Admittedly, I don't watch a lot of movies in 3D, but games are a different story. Games can be so much more immersive when played in 3D.

about a month ago
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Of the following, I'd rather play ...

enharmonix Re:Go (274 comments)

If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes should fall like a house of cards. Checkmate!

Oh, how I wish I had moderator points.

about a month ago
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More Quantum Strangeness: Particles Separated From Their Properties

enharmonix Mod parent up... (144 comments)

Now that I understood. I am actually a little interested to see what kinds of experiments they do along these lines. It seems like string theorists might actually have the opportunity to predict behaviors that the standard model cannot. Unless it just ends up being some previously unknown new elementary bosons... but we already got Higgs. Do we really need more elementary bosons?

about 2 months ago
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More Quantum Strangeness: Particles Separated From Their Properties

enharmonix Can we dumb it down some more? (144 comments)

I'm not exactly sure I followed what happened, and I read the dumbed down version. I don't see how this isn't an extreme case of superposition, but I'm not clear on what they did. They split a stream of neutrons into an upper beam with spin going forward and a lower beam with spin going backward. They did stuff to the lower beam that didn't happen to the upper beam? And it keeps mentioning recombining the beams but I didn't quite catch what profound result that had. Can somebody who follows this please explain it?

about 2 months ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

enharmonix Re:But scarcity! (390 comments)

It was a joke, but if we are going to take it seriously it is certainly not out of the realm of possibility for an ISP to redirect a specific URL to a different URL. Just get the 404 page from the site and redirect it there as it passes through the provider's network gear. Similar process to the one used by internet providers in countries that have mandatory blacklists for "pirate" sites.

Thank God. I was completely convinced you were dead serious. I always laugh when I see somebody feed a troll or miss such an obvious joke, but I guess it still happens to me every once in a while too.

As for what's possible, I had considered spoofing a 404 page in the US by a US corporation against another US corporation over an issue the NSA probably doesn't care about too unlikely and confusing to mention to such an obvious n00b. :) Anyway, I actually hit Post too soon. I meant to mention how it was probably just the slashdot effect and how much funnier that is than if Verizon was responsible. I know the capacity of Level 3's web server says nothing about their network infrastructure, but I still find it hilarious. (I'd use the word ironic, but now I'm afraid you'd know I was using it incorrectly.)

about 2 months ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

enharmonix Re:No excuses left (390 comments)

But, but, but... regulation is the antithesis of the Capitaist way that our republican Democracy has weaned its children on since it was formed!!

I do tend to agree though - regulation of ISPs is probably the only way to deal with this.

That is basically the way I see it, too. Capitalism works extremely well as long as there is real competition. It fails miserably when there is no competition and when that happens, strict regulation is needed. Nobody seems to understand that anymore. There is no middle ground in regulating a free market. It has to be black or white because when it's gray, somebody is getting screwed. The absolute worst thing that you can do to an economy is half-assed regulation. You get artificial, government sanctioned monopolies that, as all monopolies ever have always done, abuse their power.

And sure enough, on one side, you've got Democrats writing laws requiring that whatever industry their biggest contributor is in has to do certain things a particular way (which happens to be the way their biggest donor already does things and most of their competitors don't because it's pathetically inefficient or lazy, or how their biggest contributor would like to do things so they can charge more), all for the little guy's rights or the victim's safety or whatever, while the Republicans defend that same donor's (who, coincidentally, is also their biggest contributor) right to continue abusing the new or expanded monopoly (or trust) they just received from the aforementioned Democrat's new law, in defense of the free market. Everybody sees them on TV, fighting ravenously to defend their principles, but fails to notice that both of them just gave their corporate sponsors exactly what they wanted, at the public's expense.

And that is precisely why we're screwed. Most of the people who aren't too lazy to stop watching TV to get out and vote end up voting for one of the two clowns they saw duking it out on TV. Anybody left who realizes just how badly we're being screwed has given up and stays home and watches TV.

about 2 months ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

enharmonix Re:But scarcity! (390 comments)

Your ISP isn't Verizon by chance is it?

No, if he's getting a 404, there's a connection to the server. Would be hilarious if Verizon had something to do with it, but we can't pin that one on them.

about 2 months ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

enharmonix Level 3 - start pulling cards (390 comments)

Find locations where you will hurt Verizon customers, and cut the cables. Do so publicly. Precondition repair on upgrades of Verizon's network as you direct. If Verizon doesn't want network neutrality, then punish their customers.

I wish it was that simple, but I'm on board with the general idea. I wouldn't publicly cut the cables. That's too extreme. I would, however, like to see Level 3 turn the tables and publicly (as noisily as possible) accuse Verizon of using up all their bandwidth and that if Verizon doesn't help them pay for the costs of upgrading, their customers just won't be able to watch Netflix anymore. "I don't see why Verizon is taking issue with this. It's standard practice. People download a lot of video from us. Remember folks, we're not downloading from them! Verizon's users are downloading from us! They're the ones using all the traffic!" (I know that's a completely inaccurate and misleading explanation of the situation - an outright lie, if you will - but that's the point.)

If Verizon customer's thought "Who's Level 3? Netflix is paying them so I can watch Netflix, and now they want to charge Verizon money so I can watch Netflix? So basically I'm getting charged twice to watch Netflix? This will not stand!"

Then when everybody has turned their heads in their direction, Level 3 would say, "Just kidding! Here's what's really going on..." and tell people a simplified version of what they said in TFA. Then maybe people would start to care about net neutrality. (If you were to replace Level 3 with Netflix themselves, it would oh, so much better!)

Of course, it's a good thing I'm not in charge of either company because I'd have just lost an unprecedented amount of business and ruined the company's reputation in the process, and unfortunately, the average person isn't going to respond a calm, well-reasoned, fact-based argument like TFA. Most people just aren't going to care as long as there's something playing on TV. When you get in the way of that, people will definitely notice, but anybody even remotely involved in such an affair will be ruined for life.

about 2 months ago
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Microsoft Suspending "Patch Tuesday" Emails

enharmonix Re:The Canadian law doesn't apply to these (145 comments)

Like those obnoxious .com sites that only sell to North America.

I live in the US and can say this is never going to change. The internet was not always international, and when it opened up to the public, .com implicitly meant the US. There are still tons of Americans who don't know a .us ccTLD even exists, and no two registrants can share a 2nd level domain in .us. There is a .co.uk but .co.us belongs to the state of Colorodo, and only one person/entity can register something similar like .com.us, so sharing a 2nd-level TLD isn't an option without a middleman. In fact, 2nd level domain registration wasn't even allowed for the public at first, so sites like google.us couldn't exist. Google had to go with .com (Google could have made a case for .net, but back then, .net belonged to ISPs and the like and people didn't jump over to that TLD until we started running out of .com's). Once 2nd-level domain names in the .us TLD opened up to the public, a lot of sites that were already well established haven't bothered to register (or at least maintain) a .us domain because everybody already has their original .com address memorized (so for example, there is no amazon.us). Kind of circular problem, you see? Companies don't use .us because people don't know about it, and people don't know about it because nobody uses it. Not going to change anytime soon.

about 3 months ago
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Amazon's Android Appstore Coming To BlackBerry

enharmonix I'm sorry, could you repeat the question? (76 comments)

The question: is it enough to save BlackBerry in the consumer market, or is it too little, too late?

How long has it been since BlackBerry has had more than a negligible share of the consumer market? These days, they seem to be almost exclusively enterprise. Seriously, the last time I can think of that anybody I know who bought their own BlackBerry was like 7 years ago. Who is using BlackBerry for personal use?

about 3 months ago
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Time Dilation Drug Could Let Heinous Criminals Serve 1,000 Year Sentences

enharmonix Re:Ridiculous. (914 comments)

being able to lock a person up for 6 months as opposed to 30 years and getting the same result might be a good thing.

I hit Submit too soon. I should add that this would absolutely need to be completely voluntary. You can't tinker with somebody's brain without permission, especially as punishment. That's just wrong.

about 6 months ago
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Time Dilation Drug Could Let Heinous Criminals Serve 1,000 Year Sentences

enharmonix Re:Ridiculous. (914 comments)

That's ridiculous. If we wanted to cause as much damage to the criminals as possible, why not simply reinstate torture?

You missed part of it. "Is it really OK to lock someone up for the best part of the only life they will ever have, or might it be more humane to tinker with their brains and set them free?" Yes, you can inflict longer sentences for more severe cases, but they have more of their lifespan left when they get done serving their sentence. Don't get me wrong, I think 1000 year sentences are both cruel and unusual, but being able to lock a person up for 6 months as opposed to 30 years and getting the same result might be a good thing.

about 6 months ago
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Mathematician: Is Our Universe a Simulation?

enharmonix Re:A looping simulation, apparently (745 comments)

they are fundamentally unverifiable

They are fundamentally unverifiable as long as you are inside them. Of course, if you can ever escape your simulation, that suggests duality... On that note, Descartes did not believe reality was an illusion and yet he believed in duality. They seem mutually exclusive to me.

about 7 months ago
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Mathematician: Is Our Universe a Simulation?

enharmonix Re:A looping simulation, apparently (745 comments)

e^(i*pi)+1=0

Isn't that answer supposed to be 42?

I believe you are thinking of 6 * 9.

about 7 months ago
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Putting the Next Generation of Brains In Danger

enharmonix Re:Number of _known_ dangers (143 comments)

There seem to be more things that are _known_ to be dangerous, but these things obviously were dangerous even when we didn't know they were.

I moderated a really controversial article once and as a result I stopped getting moderator points (as I expect did anybody else who moderated in that discussion, because I promoted comments on both sides of the issue). Since I can't mod you up, I'll just say "good point" in hopes that you get modded up some more.

Taking your comment a step further, this is "Good news, everyone!" because when we know these chemicals are bad, we avoid them. Not all of them are regulated, but manufacturers know people care about their kids safety so they avoid using chemicals shown to be bad (like BPA). That doesn't mean kids are no longer exposed to all of them, but I'd wager they're exposed to significantly fewer of them in smaller amounts than we were as kids.

about 7 months ago
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NSF Report Flawed; Americans Do Not Believe Astrology Is Scientific

enharmonix Re: Really good question (326 comments)

But numerology... Now that's science!

about 7 months ago
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NSF Report Flawed; Americans Do Not Believe Astrology Is Scientific

enharmonix All I've got to say... (326 comments)

Thank heavens!

about 7 months ago
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Computer Geeks As Loners? Data Says Otherwise

enharmonix Re:Does the data imply better marriages? (158 comments)

LOL .. do you read Slashdot at all?

Because I would say most of us are suffering from "asshole syndrome" instead of "nice guy syndrome".

My original UID was in the 100,000s (I think, I seem to recall being disappointed it wasn't 5 digits). Anyway, the point is... I've read slashdot for a long time and most of the people here seem to fit the nerd stereotype pretty well and seems they still do, as long as you ignore the trolls and flamebait. The heated arguments here are always about data and empirical evidence and formal logic and the like. We don't really get passionate about everyday life, so I was basing my observations of nerds on people I know IRL. I really can't speak for your average /.er, on this subject because the subject just doesn't come up too often.

about 7 months ago
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Computer Geeks As Loners? Data Says Otherwise

enharmonix Re:[Fuck Beta] Re: Engineers FTW! (158 comments)

You realize that getting married means you get to pay MORE in taxes, right?

Nope. Dropped my taxes.

I have three kids. I haven't paid taxes in 9 years. The year we bought our house we actually got a refund of $12,000 from all the tax credits we qualified for.

about 7 months ago

Submissions

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Ask Slashdot: An open source PC music studio?

enharmonix enharmonix writes  |  about 8 months ago

enharmonix (988983) writes "I have a big decision to make. I am probably going to buy a laptop that I will primarily use for music. I would prefer an OEM distro so I don't need to install the OS myself (not that I mind), but I have no preference between open- and closed-source software as an end-user; I just care about the quality of the product. There are two applications that I absolutely must have: 1) a standard notation transcription program with quality auditioning (i.e., playback with quality sound fonts or something similar, better than your standard MIDI patches) that can also accept recorded audio in lieu of MIDI playback, and 2) a capable synthesizer (the more options, the better). If there's software out there that does both 1 and 2 in the same app, that's even better. I've played with some of Ubuntu's offerings for music a few years ago and some are very good, though not all of them are self-explanatory and the last time I checked, none of them really met my needs. I am not so worried about number 2 because I think I could pretty easily develop my own in .NET/Mono, which I think would be a fun project (which would be open source, of course). I am a Gnome fan so if I go with Linux, I will almost certainly go with standard Ubuntu over Kubuntu, but Gnome seems to rule out Rosegarden which was the best FOSS transcription software out there the last time I checked. The other solution I've thought of is to just shell out the $600 for Finale, which I'm more than willing to do, but I'm not so sure I want Windows 8 and I'm just not sure I can afford to go with a Mac on top of the $600 for Finale. I don't intend to put more than one OS on my laptop, either. Any slashdotters out there dabble in composing/recording, using MIDI, sound fonts, recorded audio, and/or synthesizers? What setup of hardware/OS/software works for you? Can FOSS music software compete with their pricier closed source competitors?"
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Google faces off against Intellectual Ventures in landmark patent trial

enharmonix enharmonix writes  |  about 8 months ago

enharmonix (988983) writes "Although Google initially invested in Intellectual Ventures, a patent holding firm, the two have since parted ways and are about to face off in court over some technologies used in Motorola (and other) phones. This is an important battle and the timing is significant given Congress's recent interest in patent reform."
Link to Original Source
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Schneier: Police data-mining done right

enharmonix enharmonix writes  |  more than 7 years ago

enharmonix writes "Courtesy of Bruce Schneier, it's nice to hear something good about data mining for a change: predicting and stopping crime. For example, police in Redmond, VA, "started overlaying crime reports with other data, such as weather, traffic, sports events and paydays for large employers. The data was analyzed three times a day and something interesting emerged: Robberies spiked on paydays near cheque cashing storefronts in specific neighbourhoods. Other clusters also became apparent, and pretty soon police were deploying resources in advance and predicting where crime was most likely to occur.""
Link to Original Source
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Chinese gamers get to execute corrupt officials

enharmonix enharmonix writes  |  more than 7 years ago

enharmonix writes "The Chinese government has launched an online game where players advance by killing corrupt government officials using weapons, magic, or torture. Apparently it's very popular — the game has already reached 100,000 downloads and even had to be taken offline while they upgrade their systems to handle the load."
Link to Original Source
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enharmonix enharmonix writes  |  more than 7 years ago

enharmonix writes "The Register is reporting on a strange new phishing technique that is able to fool IE7's phishing filter and Norton 360. Spoofed sites include PayPal, eBay, HSBC and others. The sites are confirmed to be fraudulent but are cleared by both security tools. The exploit seems to be specific to Internet Explorer (FireFox just goes straight to the correct site). Roger Thompson of Exploit Prevention labs believes users may have an html injector that communicates directly with IE and modifies the HTML of legitimate websites."
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enharmonix enharmonix writes  |  more than 7 years ago

enharmonix writes "Just a bit of an update on the recent digg revolt over AACS. Well, the New York Times has taken notice and written quite a decent article that actually acknowledges that the take down notices amount to censorship and documents instances of the infamous key appearing in purely expressive form (I was pleased to see the similarity to 2600 and deCSS was not lost on the Times either). More interesting though is that the EFF's Fred von Lohmann blames the digg revolt on lawyers. And in an opinion piece, John Dvorak expands on that theme."
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enharmonix enharmonix writes  |  more than 7 years ago

enharmonix writes "According to an article in PCWorld, "The U.S. departments of Defense and State received F grades, and Homeland Security a D, in the latest scorecard measuring their information security measures. Representative Tom Davis ... said it was 'troubling' that three of the main agencies fighting terrorism received low grades again in their compliance with the Federal Information Security Management Act.""
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enharmonix enharmonix writes  |  more than 7 years ago

enharmonix writes "I recently came across this post to alt.tv.futurama that references this IMDB entry. Yup, it's Bender's Big Score (a.k.a., The Futurama Movie). Before you get too excited, this guy claims to have read the script, and states that it will be broadcast in 4 parts in X-mas of 2007, though it's not clear whether these are the first four episodes of Season 5 (2008)."

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