Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

NASA Halts Non-ISS Work With Russia Over Ukraine Crisis

eternaldoctorwho Wait... (291 comments)

Isn't this the sort of thing that the ISS collaboration was supposed to prevent?

about 7 months ago
top

Interviews: Ask J. Michael Straczynski What You Will

eternaldoctorwho Influence from 2001 (276 comments)

Having been inspired up by some of the hard science in Babylon 5, I can't help but think back now and wonder about the similarities to the movie and book 2001: A Space Odyssey. Examples I've noticed include rotation-based artificial gravity, inertia-realistic spaceflight, and the design of Earth spaceships. Did 2001 (book and/or movie) have a significant inspiration on you during the creation and production of Babylon 5?

Thanks for B5, and all your other works!

about 7 months ago
top

Interviews: Ask J. Michael Straczynski What You Will

eternaldoctorwho Babylon 5 Influence (276 comments)

First off, I want to say thank you for your work on Babylon 5! It was one of my favorite TV programs growing up, and it definitely helped influence my getting into the sciences as a profession. I always saw that show as a good example of "hard" science fiction, versus other programs at the time. I never saw rotation-made artificial gravity on Star Trek!

Babylon 5 had some pretty intense story arcs, especially apparent in seasons 3 and 4, so it required a lot of forethought and planning prior to production. What influence has this sort of "arc planning" had on your more recent projects, and in what way do you see the influence of Babylon 5's level of writing on scfi-fi programs in the near future?

Thanks for having an interview with Slashdot!

about 7 months ago
top

Tanzania Fossils May Pinpoint Critical Split Between Apes and Monkeys

eternaldoctorwho Relation to Ida? (25 comments)

This is very interesting - I just finished reading The Link by Colin Tudge, et al (You can get it here. I definitely recommend reading it if you are even vaguely interested in paleontology). In it, they discuss Ida, a specimen found in Germany's Messel pit, which is believed to be closely related to the first common ancestor between anthropoids (Old & New World apes, hominids) and other simians (lemurs, tarsiers, etc). If the claim made in the article is true, the discovered species would be contemporary with our ancestor living after Ida but before hominids separated from apes. A really great find! I wonder what a comparison between Ida and this new species will reveal. Mind you, that may never happen, since Ida is a very complete fossil and all they found here were teeth and fragments.

about a year and a half ago
top

Interviews: Ask J. Michael Straczynski What You Will

eternaldoctorwho True Science Fiction (215 comments)

Babylon 5 was great on many levels, but I enjoyed the most for its well-thought-out story and as an example of true science fiction. It contained many elements that were based much more in fact than in fantasy, something that was rare for its time, and even more rare today. What research and/or advisers did you have to go on when writing/producing for the show? What do you foresee for the future of science fiction television (or streaming or online) content in terms of using real-world science?

And thank you again for Babylon 5. :)

about a year and a half ago
top

Interviews: Ask What You Will of Paleontologist Jack Horner

eternaldoctorwho Thanks! (208 comments)

Dr. Horner, you have inspired me to engage in the sciences ever since I was a little kid. Although I didn't go into the field of paleontology, I did study computer science and became a software developer for an education company. In my field, we are always trying to find ways to engage kids in the STEM fields to help develop the next generation of engineers, programmers, biologists, and even paleontologists. In your opinion, how do you see the future of your field within the next generation of scientists, and what steps should we take to help kids become more interested in the sciences?

about 2 years ago
top

Favorite U.S. Political Party

eternaldoctorwho Re:1st vote? (503 comments)

Would Santorum count as an answer to both?

about 2 years ago
top

Hurricane Sandy Nears East Coast

eternaldoctorwho Re:Don't PANIC! (281 comments)

God dammit, Towelie, you're the worst character ever.

about 2 years ago
top

If I was to be killed by science-fiction villains, I'd rather:

eternaldoctorwho Easy (405 comments)

I chose to be digested over 1000 years. That's what I never quite understood about the Sarlac (sp?) in Star Wars: how would it ever take 1000 years to do anything biological? Wouldn't my body decompose naturally long before even one century passed? How slow must an organism's metabolism be to take that long to digest food?

Sounds like I either get to live for close to 1000 years, or my remains last for 1000 years (which is much much longer than normal on this planet - kind of like leaving a monument).

about 2 years ago
top

If I was to be killed by science-fiction villains, I'd rather:

eternaldoctorwho Re:Some other fate... (405 comments)

You have just won an Internet, congratulations.
(Where are my mod points when I need them?)

about 2 years ago
top

Why Are We So Rude Online?

eternaldoctorwho Re:Simple reason (341 comments)

That's a great pizza analogy!.... ....Ah-haha, I see what you did there.

about 2 years ago
top

Game Review: Borderlands 2

eternaldoctorwho Eh (117 comments)

I liked it better when it was called Fallout. Seriously, did nobody else notice the similarities between the two when Fallout 3 and Borderlands 1 were released so close to one another?

more than 2 years ago
top

Should We Print Guns? Cody R. Wilson Says "Yes" (Video)

eternaldoctorwho I for one.... (444 comments)

...appreciate the transcript posted on the bottom. I hope this will be a new standard feature!

more than 2 years ago
top

A Call For Science Policy Debate Among Presidential Candidates

eternaldoctorwho Re:What about Ron Paul? (375 comments)

I'm going to go ahead and surrender to Godwin's Law here.
Giving a whole lot of political parties an equal voice is exactly what happened in 1930's Germany. There were so many parties running with candidates, the leading candidate for Chancellor only needed a small minority of the population to vote him in. The result was that an extremist radical was elected, despite only a (relatively) small number of people voted for him. The more parties you have, the less people need to agree with you in order to be voted in.
So, a two party system may not seem like the best way, but it at least weeds out all the radicals and keeps us somewhere near the middle of the political spectrum.

more than 2 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Is There a Professional Geek Dress Code?

eternaldoctorwho Re:Geeky yet classy (432 comments)

It's a Stetson. I wear a Stetson now. Stetsons are cool.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

top

IBM Research Creates World's Smallest Movie

eternaldoctorwho eternaldoctorwho writes  |  about a year and a half ago

eternaldoctorwho (2563923) writes "The Register reports on scientists at IBM Research creating a movie on the smallest scale ever. Moving atoms around one-by-one, the movie "A Boy and His Atom" consists of 242 frames and lasts under 100 seconds. The company is researching atomic scale storage, and has released the movie as "a fun way to share the atomic-scale world while opening up a dialogue with students and others on the new frontiers of math and science." The jury is still out on whether IMDB will list the short film or not."
top

New Doctor Who Companion Announced

eternaldoctorwho eternaldoctorwho writes  |  more than 2 years ago

eternaldoctorwho (2563923) writes "Jenna-Louise Coleman will be the newest companion to the Doctor (Matt Smith) on the hit series, Doctor Who. The announcement came earlier today on the BBC's Twitter page devoted to the program, along with some other details about the upcoming season of the show. Miss Coleman is also known for her previous roles on Emmerdale and Captain America: The First Avenger."
Link to Original Source
top

Why Are The Eyes Of A Giant Squid So Big?

eternaldoctorwho eternaldoctorwho writes  |  more than 2 years ago

eternaldoctorwho (2563923) writes "Marine biologists have long known that the eyes of a giant squid are proportionately among the biggest in the animal kingdom. A hypothesis recently published in Current Biology theorizes that the squids need such large ocular organs to spot their largest natural predator — the sperm whale. The Register reports the full story on how the beasties can spot their enemies at such murky depths."
Link to Original Source
top

Mammal Successful Before Dinosaur Extinction

eternaldoctorwho eternaldoctorwho writes  |  more than 2 years ago

eternaldoctorwho (2563923) writes "New evidence has been uncovered that suggests mammals were widely successful at least 20 million years before dinosaurs went extinct in the K-T asteroid impact. A recently published study in Nature by paleontologist Greg Wilson of the University of Washington reveals that multituberculates (a class of mice-like mammals named for the shape of their teeth) became abundant at the same time as the rise of flowering plants. So what did finally wipe out this now-extinct class of "multis"? University of Chicago paleontologist Zhe-Xi Luo has the answer, "You could say multituberculates were a good match against the dinosaurs, but they were no match for the rodents.""
Link to Original Source
top

Scientists Work Towards Naturally Caffeine-Free Coffee

eternaldoctorwho eternaldoctorwho writes  |  more than 2 years ago

eternaldoctorwho (2563923) writes "Research has been underway to produce a coffee bean plant that naturally has no or little caffeine content. Now, it looks like that might become a reality in the near future: Paulo Mazzafera of the University of Campinas in Brazi has come closer than ever with a strain containing "only 2% of normal caffeine levels". Coffee anyone?"
Link to Original Source

Journals

eternaldoctorwho has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?