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Comments

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Photo Web Site Offers a Wall of Shame For Image Thieves

ewhac Re:One of the oldest semantic games played on /. (126 comments)

...it is arguably "stealing reputation" (depriving another of their reputation and taking it for yourself).

I've referred to it as "reputation fraud," but yes, we appear to be in general agreement.

about two weeks ago
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Photo Web Site Offers a Wall of Shame For Image Thieves

ewhac Re:One of the oldest semantic games played on /. (126 comments)

I see this old semantic game blooms anew on Slashdot. "It isn't stealing". Fine. It's fraud. Don't worry that your reputation is shot and/or somebody else is trading on your good name. It isn't stealing. Oh... the victim feels much better now.

I don't understand; what are you complaining about? You're correct. It isn't theft, it is fraud. So why call it theft when it's clearly something else?

If you call it by the correct name, you'll get community support, even among the "copying is not theft" crowd. OTOH, if you call it stealing, then you'll get mired in a gigantic semantic dogpile as hundreds of people re-litigate what constitutes "stealing."

We don't even need to raise the "Is it stealing?" question in this case. It's clearly fraud. So call it "fraud." Geez...

about two weeks ago
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Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

ewhac DELETE THIS TOPIC NOW (723 comments)

WHAT THE FUCK IS THIS DOING ON SLASHDOT?!?

You want to spread whiny, partisan, maliciously misleading horseshit? Go to RedState or Breitbart; that's their stock in trade. It doesn't fscking belong here. Get this garbage off Slashdot now.

about two weeks ago
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OpenSSL Bug Allows Attackers To Read Memory In 64k Chunks

ewhac Re:Got the update... (303 comments)

For Linux Mint v17 (Qiana), maybe. However, Mint v15 (Olivia) got EOLed in January, so it may not get an update.

about two weeks ago
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Indie Game Jam Show Collapses Due To Interference From "Pepsi Consultant"

ewhac Re:Drama queens... (465 comments)

Professionals do the job and get paid.

They did neither.

End of argument.

"Hey, kid. If you get down in that mine, dig out the coal, and bring it back to me, I'll pay you. ...What? You want a light? Why did you take the job if you don't have the tools to do it? Batteries cost money, kid. ...What? What's all this whining about dust and poisonous gases and how you can't carry more than two lumps because you're only six years old? I'm paying you; do your job. You don't want to be thought of as unprofessional, do you?"

What self-serving sophistry.

about three weeks ago
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Indie Game Jam Show Collapses Due To Interference From "Pepsi Consultant"

ewhac Re:Drama queens... (465 comments)

"Hi. Welcome to this brightly-lit, strangely decorated cage. For the next four days, you'll be trying to design and write a video game while we surround you with cameras, force you through irrelevant tasks, and poke at you with sticks. Be sure to act professional throughout it all."

"Contracts" or not, the developers' reaction was the correct one.

about three weeks ago
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OKCupid Warns Off Mozilla Firefox Users Over Gay Rights

ewhac Can't Beat NoScript (1482 comments)

I sympathize with the sentiment, but I have yet to find a workable equivalent for Firefox + NoScript. (Sounds like a motivation for socially conscious techs to finally get Chrome up to the required standards for secure browsing.)

about three weeks ago
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Peter Molyneux: Working For Microsoft Is Like Taking Antidepressants

ewhac Re:Almost Famous? (164 comments)

Fable is by Lionhead Studios, home of longtime auteur game designer Peter Molyneux, who has a tendency to promise the Earth and be ultimately be crippled by his own ambition (see the big fat broken monkey-fest Black & White). During the development of Fable, for example, it was promised to have features like rival NPC characters, plants growing in real time, and a system wherein your every slightest choice and action changes your appearance and the world around you. What we ended up with was a buggy action RPG with a great big stiffy for itself.

-- Yahtzee Croshaw

about a month ago
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How Do You Backup 20TB of Data?

ewhac Re:Hmmm... (983 comments)

I had only hard of LTO tapes quite recently, and I did a very tiny bit of poking around. The latest generation is LTO-6, whose tapes can hold 2.5TB each (uncompressed). The tapes themselves are quite modestly priced -- an LTO-4 tape cartridge (800GB uncompressed) costs about $30 each.

The drives, however, are not cheap. New drives appear to start at around $1200. Used drives are all over the place -- I've seen some on eBay with an opening bid as low as $350. Also, all LTO drives appear to have either an LVD SCSI or a SAS interface, which means you'll also need a controller card. There appears to be no such thing as a SATA LTO drive.

Plus you get to re-live all the joys of selecting tape vendors, and placing bets on whose tapes are going to last for 20 years.

about a month and a half ago
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Google Won't Enable Chrome Video Acceleration Because of Linux GPU Bugs

ewhac Re:Bullshit! (295 comments)

Mmmm, nope. I'm still seeing ludicrously sluggish behavior on some pages (some of Jira's pages, and on some of Freescale's discussion fora).

Browser: Chrome 33.0.1750.146
OS: Linux Mint 15 ("Olivia"), kernel 3.8.x
GPU: Intel i965
OpenGL Version: 3.0 Mesa 9.1.7

Mind you, if I only turn on HW acceleration in the advanced settings panel, GMail runs sluggishly. If I also then enable your software rendering override, then GMail appears to run normally, but in both cases I still get the sluggish Jira pages. I've no idea what Jira's doing that would run so slowly.

about 1 month ago
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RadioShack To Close 1,100 Stores

ewhac Re:Stop Being Something Your Not (423 comments)

Here ya go: http://www.electronicplus.com/

It's a family-owned and -operated business, with a single retail presence in San Rafael, CA. I used to have a part-time job there when I was in high school. That was (*gah!*) 30 years ago. They're still in business.

There was a Radio Shack in town, too, but you only went there for the pre-fab project kits and the free battery. (And the TRS-80 computers, if you were in to those.)

Electronics Plus's prices are nothing to write home about. But their selection is Z0MG!!1! Where did they find all this stuff?!? The only places you'll find an equally astonishing variety of things is HSC and Weird Stuff Warehouse (and maybe Fry's).

about 1 month ago
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Open Source Video Editor Pitivi Seeks Crowdfunding to Reach 1.0

ewhac Re:I'm surprised ... (79 comments)

Gratuitous plug for my YouTube "Let's Play" playlist.

All the videos I've compiled and uploaded to YouTube have been made using Kdenlive. I don't labor under the notion that it's perfect, but I found it much better and more accessible that anything else I tried.

Kdenlive's most annoying bug at the moment is that the sound in the final compiled video will sometimes drift, i.e. in an hour-long video, the sound will start off in sync with the video but, by the time you get to the end, it's as much as 1.5 seconds off. This drift does not appear when playing back in the editor timeline; only in the final compiled video. I have not been able to reliably reproduce this issue for the developers, nor do I have a notion of what triggers it. Once it appears in a project, it's there and you can't get rid of it. It's possible it's an issue with MLT (the library on which Kdenlive is built) but, again, I haven't isolated the issue.

Other than that, it's worked very well for me. Even on those occasions when it has crashed, it has never destroyed my work; just re-launch and pick up from where you left off.

If something better came along, I would jump to it without much thought. But I haven't found it yet. I'll give 'pitivi' another look, but it looks as if installing it into my generic Debian system will be a pain (v0.92 is only available in the 'experimental' repository).

about 2 months ago
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Music Industry Is Keeping Streaming Services Unprofitable

ewhac Re:quite the news flash... (118 comments)

I was the CEO of a company that sold ringtones and MP3s a la carte for mobile devices. When you added up (1) the licenses paid to record labels, (2) the fees paid to mobile operators for payment processing, and (3) publishing royalties, it was something like 120% of the retail price for the content. So, umm, not a really scalable business model.

I find this fascinating, especially given that the prices charged for ringtones were pure usury. I wonder if you'd be willing to relate a more detailed story of what you were facing.

about 2 months ago
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Microsoft Rumored To Integrate Android Apps

ewhac Re:Security (189 comments)

Security? On a Windows platform?

You must be new here.

about 2 months ago
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Google Fiber Launches In Provo — and Here's What It Feels Like

ewhac Re:not fast enough for this tiger (338 comments)

15 years ago, nobody "needed" broadband. Dialup was, "good enough."

Today, try doing anything other than text-only email over 56Kb dialup.

Broadband uptake enabled a new class of Internet sites and services. Google is betting that history will repeat itself by kicking speeds up by two orders of magnitude. It also has the beneficial side-effect of lighting a fire under AT&T's slothful ass.

Also keep in mind that GFiber offerings are symmetric. That means you get to upload your photos and videos at 1Gb/sec as well, and not through the 768Kb straw that DSL and cable providers decided was "good enough" for consumer-class Internet.

about 3 months ago
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Exponential Algorithm In Windows Update Slowing XP Machines

ewhac .NET Updates Clobber My System (413 comments)

I couldn't tell you why, but I haven't (yet) observed the described behavior on my XP system. The auto-updater ususally settles down in a matter of minutes.

No. In my case, it's trying to apply the .NET updates that completely murders my system. Apparently MS wants a gigabyte or so of free disk space on C:\ (and nowhere else) or the update will fail miserably. As it happens, my system partition has about 200MB free space, so the update disappears down a rabbit hole and never completes.

I used to think it was because it needed a bunch of temporary disk space, so last night I changed the TMP and TEMP environment variables to point to a volume with tons of free space, rebooted (because, you know, it's Windows), set just one of the several .NET updates running, then went off to see The Hobbit. When I returned some three hours later, the update had hung, the disk was idle, C:\ had zero bytes free, and the system log was corrupted.

Honestly, I don't know why anyone continues to be surprised by Redmond's rank incompetence...

Schwab

about 4 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Practical Bitrot Detection For Backups?

ewhac ZFS is Not a Panacea (321 comments)

FreeNAS and ZFS are indeed awesome. But before y'all go installing FreeNAS on some spare hardware and think your problem is solved, you need to be aware that ZFS is not a panacea. You can't just drop it on Any Old Box with default settings and expect it to magically keep your data safe unto perpetuity. You need to pay attention to what you're doing.

Some highlights:

  • ZFS's design requires RAM to be perfectly reliable, or at least report imperfections. Undetected bitrot in RAM can and will destroy your entire ZFS pool. Thus, a machine with ECC RAM installed is a requirement.
  • As if that weren't enough, ZFS eats huge amounts of RAM. The current guideline is 1 GiB of RAM per TB of disk spindles, with 8 GiB as a practical minimum.
  • ZFS assumes it has perfect knowledge of disk writes in-flight, and as such doesn't play well with RAID controllers, which can silently re-order writes. If your machine has a RAID controller, the RAID features should be turned off. Don't worry, ZFS has its own RAID features. However:
  • Because drive densities are now approaching drive error rates (10**13 bits of storage, with manufacturers quoting uncorrectable errors every 10**14 bits read), ZFS RAID-Z1 is no longer considered sufficient to ensure storage integrity, and you should plan for RAID-Z2 (two parity drives).
  • For the same reason as turning off RAID, a "production" FreeNAS/ZFS installation should not be run in a virtual machine. It's okay if you're just test-driving it to get a sense of what it can do, but a live system should run on actual hardware.
  • Using ZFS's de-duplication feature is officially discouraged. It may seem like a great idea, but it will gobble all your RAM and return very little benefit. On average, you're better off using compression.

When ZFS dies, it dies in a big and fairly comprehensive way, and ZFS will die if you under-provide it. In any event, you should RTFM before contemplating a build, and know the trade-offs you're getting in to.

Schwab

about 4 months ago
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The Real Story of Hacking Together the Commodore C128

ewhac Re:Megahertz myth and the 6502 (179 comments)

I don't have time to correct all the errors in the parent post. So very briefly:

  • The 6502 had three 8-bit registers: A, X, and Y. A was the accumulator, and received the result of all arithmetic operations. X and Y could hold temporary data, arithmetic operands, and be used as index registers for memory load/store. There was also an 8-bit stack pointer register, SP, hard-mapped to the range 0x0100 - 0x01FF.
  • The 8080 had the 8-bit registers A, B, C, D, E, H, L, and a 16-bit stack pointer. In addition, the registers B & C, D & E, and H & L could be used to hold 16-bit quantities for some instructions.
  • The Z80 had all the registers of the 8080, plus a shadow copy of the registers for quick use by interrupt service routines.
  • The 6502's zero page (0x0000 - 0x00FF) got special treatment by the CPU, using only a single byte to address a location. As such, zero page usually got treated by software as a pile of "slow registers."
  • No instruction on the 6502 executed in fewer than two clock cycles. The fastest 6502 I ever saw was 2 MHz.
  • By contrast, 4 Mhz Z80 chips were widespread.
  • The Z80 helped popularize dynamic RAMs by containing a very basic DRAM refresh counter. The 6502 had no such thing; DRAM refresh was usually provided by custom logic, usually part of the video controller.
  • S-100 machines had huge power supplies because they had huge numbers of slots (eight or more being common), and had to have enough reserve power for all of them.
  • There was nothing special about the 6502's memory access patterns, and 6502 would get starved out like any other CPU if another device held the bus. On the C-64 in particular, every eight video lines, the VIC would grab the bus for 40 uSecs to fetch the next row of character cells, holding off the 6502 the whole time. This led to all kinds of problems with timing-sensitive operations, and was directly responsible for transfers to/from the 1541 floppy drive to be glacially slow.

Schwab

about 4 months ago
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Lenovo Shows Android Laptop In Leaked User Manuals

ewhac Re:Fine, just give us back the ThinkPad (106 comments)

Agreed. I have a Z61t that is seriously starting to show its age. But the last ThinkPad I will seriously consider buying is the T420, which is no longer made. The current xx30 models (T430, X230, etc.) gratuitously changed the keyboard.

Seriously, Lenovo? You fscked with the ThinkPad keyboard?? The keyboard by which all other laptop keyboards were judged for well over ten years? You just threw that away?

I've been idly looking at "white box" laptops as a possible upgrade avenue, but I have no idea what's going to replace my Z61t. Hell, if I could upgrade its guts to something modern, I'd do it...

about 6 months ago
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Come Try Out Slashdot's New Design (In Beta)

ewhac ABSO-FSCKING-LUTELY NOT! (1191 comments)

You are forbidden from deploying this design. Dear $(GOD), what the hell is the matter with you? Who told you this was a good idea? Which three-pleat consultant said that this highly technical readership wanted this site to look like a fluffy blog with fscktons of whitespace? How much money did s/he take from you? Have you caught them yet?

For those of you who would rather browse Slashdot without pictures, click the icon at the top right of the story column, and switch to Classic View.

Does. Not. Work.

This is real, pathetically simple, Mr. S:

  • Install Firefox.
  • Install NoScript plugin. Leave at default settings.
  • Surf to your site.

If your site does not operate correctly using this browser setup, --== YOUR SITE IS BROKEN!!==-- Please do not assume that the users on this of all sites are fscking morons who leave their browsers in an insecure state and happily execute just Any Damned Script. You're lucky I'm willing to whitelist fsdn.com, but just who the fsck is rpxnow.com, or ooyala.com?

Scrap the whole damned thing and start over. Better still: Don't start over. It's fine the way it is.

about 7 months ago

Submissions

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MythBusters Mishap Sends Cannonball Through House

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ewhac writes "The San Francisco Chronicle is reporting that the MythBusters accidentally sent a cannon ball hurtling in to Dublin this afternoon, punching through a home, bouncing across a six-lane road, and ultimately coming to a rest inside a now-demolished Toyota minivan. Amazingly, there were no injuries. The ball was fired from a home-made cannon at the Alameda County Sheriff's Department bomb range, and was intended to strike a water target. Instead the ball missed the water, punched through a cinder-block wall, and skipped off the hill behind. Prior to today, the MythBusters had been shooting episodes at the bomb range for over seven years without major incident. It is not clear whether Savage/Hyneman or Belleci/Imahara/Byron were conducting the experiment."
Link to Original Source
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xkcd Creator Randall Munroe Nominated for Hugo

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ewhac writes "Easter Sunday saw the release of the nominations for the 2011 Hugo Awards. Among the many distinguished names was Randall Munroe, creator of xkcd, nominated for the 2011 award for Best Fan Artist. The 2011 Hugos will be presented at WorldCon 2011 in Reno in August this year. (Be sure to fill out and return your ballot!)"
Link to Original Source
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Facebook App Exposes Abject Insecurity

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ewhac writes "Back in June, the American Civil Liberties Union published an article describing Facebook's complete lack of meaningful security on your and your friends' information. The article went virtually unnoticed. Now, a developer has written a Facebook "Quiz" based on the original article that graphically illustrates all the information a Facebook app can get its grubby little hands on by recursively sweeping through your friends list, pulling all their info and posts, and showing it to you. What's more, apps can get at your information even if you never run the app yourself. Facebook apps run with the access privileges of the user running it, so anything your friend can see, the app they're running can see, too. It is unclear whether the developer of the Facebook app did so "officially" for the ACLU."
Link to Original Source
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Fry's Exec Arrested for Embezzling $65M

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ewhac writes "The vice president of mechandising and operations for Fry's Electronics, Ausaf Umar Siddiqui, was arrested last Friday on charges of embezzlement to the tune of at least $65 million. Sales representatives are normally independent contractors, to preserve impartiality during negotiations. According to IRS allegations, Siddiqui convinced Fry's management he should be sole sales representative. He then struck side deals with major vendors (not named in the complaint) starting in 2005 where, in exchange for placing large orders and keeping their products on the shelves, the vendors would pay enormous kickbacks to a shell corporation set up by Siddiqui, called PC International. Siddiqui used the money to lead an extravagant lifestyle, racking up nearly $18 million in casino gambling losses. He is currently held on $300,000 bond."
Link to Original Source
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Vandal Destroys Scenemusic.net

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ewhac writes "Scenemusic.net, a/k/a Nectarine.fr, a site continuously streaming demoscene-related music for over eight years, was destroyed today by an online vandal. Scenemusic.net's collection was one of the most comprehensive on the net, with tunes going back over 20 years to the Commodore-64 days. Still recovering from a similar attack barely a month ago, Scenemusic.net had been reassembled and was staggering back to its feet when today's attack maliciously and completely destroyed the database. Left without a usable backup, the site's administrator Christophe has sadly decided to throw in the towel, and has recommended to PayPal subscribers helping to defray bandwidth costs to cancel their subscriptions.

Editorial Remarks: We may idly speculate about Christophe's security and administrative acumen, but this remains a sad loss for the net, not merely for the destroyed resource, but for the ever-decreasing ability for hobbyists and enthusiasts to operate an Internet presence without being completely overrun by anonymous, and in many cases automated, sociopaths."

Link to Original Source
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Diagnosing WiFi Dropouts

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ewhac writes "A rather important user on my home wireless network — my sweetie — regularly experiences drop-outs on the network lasting from a few seconds to three minutes, which cause timeouts and are nearly fatal to her computer usage. Before I blame the problem on her machine, I would like to conclusively prove or disprove the culpability of the wireless network environment. What diagnostic tools are available? Are there ways of measuring the resilience of a WiFi interface to noise/interference? Assuming it's neighbors with competing WAPs, how can I measure the degree of interference they may be causing? How can I correlate RF noise with a network hang?

More detail: My sweetie extensively surfs the net from a Win-XP laptop (and before you accuse the machine of being infected with something, she's very dilligent at keeping it clean and up to date). She virtually lives off this machine, so I can't run dedicated diagnostic tools on it for more than a couple hours. I thought I'd solved the problem by upgrading the WAP from an old Linksys WAP54G to a Netgear WG302v2, but it only marginally reduced the problem. These drop-out issues are not observed on any of the hard-wired computers. The LAN switch is Linksys, and the NAT gateway to the Internet is a dedicated FreeBSD box, so I don't suspect any issues there. So I'd like to test the wireless network and find out what, if anything, is causing the hiccups. I'm aware of passive monitoring tools like kismet, but ultimately I need to diagnose the connection to her machine, ideally in a minimally invasive way."
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Appeals Court Tosses "Wardrobe Malfunction"

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ewhac writes "One of the most famous live television gaffes in recent history was the 2004 SuperBowl halftime "wardrobe malfunction," which briefly exposed a mortified Janet Jackson's breast to an international audience. Bowing to coordinated pressure from socially conservative groups, the FCC fined CBS $550K for the mishap — the $27,500 maximum fine multiplied by CBS's 20 owned-and-operated stations. Today, the US Third Circuit Court of Appeals threw the fine out, saying that the FCC had deviated from its 30-year history on previous such matters, and had, "acted arbitrarily and capriciously," when levying the fine."
Link to Original Source
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"Cheaper" 3G iPhone May End Up Costing You

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ewhac writes "What Apple giveth, AT&T stealeth right back. A Salon article reads the fine print and crunches the numbers, and finds that the $200 handset price drop is more than eaten up by AT&T's $10/month price hike for unlimited data access over the mandatory two-year contract period. There has been no announcement of new carriers, so AT&T presumably remains the exclusive service provider for iPhone. Also, this rebalancing of the carrier subsidy may give Apple a fiscal incentive to quash 'jailbreak' hacks more vigorously."
Link to Original Source
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Calif. Supreme Court Overturns Gay Marriage Ban

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ewhac writes "The California State Supreme Court today struck down the state's law banning same-sex marriages. In a 4-3 decision, the court said that "domestic partnerships" were not a complete substitute for marriage. This may pave the way for California to become the second state in the Union to officially sanction same-sex marriages."
Link to Original Source
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Wikileaks Back Online

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ewhac writes "After basically bringing down the wrath of every civil libertarian in the country, U.S. District Judge Jeffrey White has conceded that he erred and exceeded Constitutional authority when ordering the Wikileaks domain to be erased, and has dissolved the injunction. He also rejected a motion to have the disputed documents purged from the Wikileaks site. White left open the possibility for Julius Baer & Co's suit to continue forward, but suggested that the bank may want to investigate other ways to redress its grievances."
Link to Original Source
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Tools for Understanding Code

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ewhac writes "Having just recently taken a new job, I find myself confronted with an enormous pile of existing, unfamiliar code written for a (somewhat) unfamiliar platform, and an implicit understanding that I'll grok it all Real Soon Now. Simply firing up an editor and reading through it has proven unequal to the task. What sorts of tools exist for effectively analyzing and understanding a large code base? (You should not assume the development or target platform is Windows.)

I'm familiar with cscope , but it doesn't really seem to analyze program structure, per se. It's just a very fancy 'grep' package with a rudimentary understanding of C syntax. As such, I've only put minimal effort in to it. A new-ish tool called ncc looks very interesting, as it appears to be based on an actual C/C++ parser, but the UI is klunky, and there doesn't appear to be any facility for integrating/communicating with an editor."
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Researchers Crack *All* CA State Voting Machines

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ewhac writes "The San Francisco Chronicle is reporting that computer security researchers throughout the University of California system managed to crack the security on every voting machine they tested that has been approved for use in the state. The researchers are unwilling to say how vulnerable the machines are, as the tests were conducted in an environment highly advantageous to the testers. They had complete access to the devices' source code and unlimited time to try and crack the machines. No malicious code was found in any of the machines, but Matt Bishop, who led the team from UC Davis, was surprised by the weakness of the security measures employed. The tests were ordered by Secretary of State Debra Bowen, who has until Friday of next week to decide whether to decertify any of the machines for use in the upcoming Presidential primary election."
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Blast at SpaceShipOne Facility Kills Two

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ewhac writes "An explosion at the Mojave Air and Space Port has killed two people and critically injured four others, according to the Associated Press. Details are sketchy at the moment. Nitrous oxide is reported to be involved, but it is not yet known if a motor test was involved. The Mojave Air and Space Port, located in the high desert near Edwards Air Force Base, is owned by Scaled Composites LLC, the builders of SpaceShipOne."
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Jim Butterfield, 1936 - 2007

ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ewhac writes "While nearly everyone was going crazy over the iPhone, the computing community lost a luminary on Friday. Jim Butterfield, an early columnist and author for hobbyist computing in the 1970's and 80's, passed away peacefully in his sleep at 1:30 AM on 29 June. He was 71. Jim had been battling cancer since at least December of last year, when he announced he was beginning chemotherapy. Jim was a frequent contributor to periodicals such as The Transactor, COMPUTE!, and TPUG; and was the author of several books on introductory programming. Jim's clear and incisive writing helped introduce a generation of newcomers to the joys and wonders of computers and computer programming. No small fraction of today's engineers owe their livlihoods to Jim's writing and enthusiasm, this chronicler included. He will be missed."
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ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ewhac writes "Karen Lodrick was entering her sixth month of hell dealing with the repercussions of having her identity stolen and used to loot her accounts. But while she was waiting for a beverage, there standing in line was the woman who appeared on Wells Fargo security video emptying her accounts. What followed was a 45 minute chase through San Francisco streets that ended with the thief being taken into custody by police."
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ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ewhac writes "It is common tradition in Western culture to not speak ill of the dead. Many will doubtless find themselves sorely tested to uphold this tradition when learning of the death of Jack Valenti, the former head of the RIAA. He was 85. Valenti, a decorated World War II veteran, abolished the restrictive Hays censorship code in favor of the motion picture ratings system which he was instrumental in designing. No stranger to controversy, he was also at loggerheads with the burgeoning high-tech community, having compared the video recorder to the Boston Strangler, and successfully lobbied Washington for the NET Act and the DMCA. Valenti died from complications of a stroke suffered in March. He had been hospitalized for several weeks at Johns Hopkins University Medical Center before passing away today."
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ewhac ewhac writes  |  about 7 years ago

ewhac writes "The Associated Press is reporting that Google has struck a deal to acquire DoubleClick for $3.1 billion in cash. DoubleClick, one of the oldest advertising companies on the Web, has been long criticized for its questionable practices of using browser cookies to quietly track the browsing habits of users. It is unclear how this acquisition meshes with Google's mantra of, "Don't be evil.""
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ewhac ewhac writes  |  about 7 years ago

ewhac writes "Apparently a Jeff Bridges film is now a credible threat to the Republic. Reports are emerging from Hollywood that the Department of Homeland Security has classified the film TRON as "sensitive" and ordered Disney studios to surrender all its copies. Concern reportedly surrounds the live action scenes shot at the Shiva nuclear fusion research facility, which apparently after 25 years are now considered to reveal sensitive details about nuclear technology."
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ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ewhac writes "iSuppli has just published the results of their tear-down of the Sony PS3. According to their estimates, Sony is losing $241 per unit for the PS3 with the 20Gig hard disk, and $306 for the 60Gig version. By contrast, the 20Gig Xbox 360 of today costs $75 less than it's $500 price tag. Even given the high BOM of the Sony, however, iSuppli describes the PS3 as a sophisticated, cutting-edge design. Other choice details include the 400 Watt power supply, and the three custom ASICs, each with over 1200 pins."

Journals

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ewhac ewhac writes  |  more than 12 years ago

This is an anchor entry so that friends can link to me. Real thoughts and opinions are most likely to show up on my Web site (when I get off my lazy ass and rebuild it).

Schwab

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