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Comments

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Excel Error Contributes To Problems With Austerity Study

explosivejared Re:It's not about debt (476 comments)

That is a simple accounting identity, a way to avoid double counting. Income (output, GDP, whichever term you choose) is just the flow of value, and it would be stupid not to include how much value went toward consumption. An economy produces x amount of value in a given year, and those are simply how the value is divvyed up. Some production goes to satisfying consumer demand, and some is held back to build more productive capacity. You're just off base not conflating your own personal semantics for what "production" should mean with a simple technical accounting identity.

about a year ago
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Excel Error Contributes To Problems With Austerity Study

explosivejared Dubious Proposition (476 comments)

Reinhart and Rogoff have certainly been warning of high debt levels, but it's wrong to give this study too much credit for what "austerity" there has been across Europe. Most cuts in places like Greece and Spain were fait accompli, once it was clear that the ECB was not going to budge on its inflation target to neither try and boost nominal growth nor to crudely relieve nominal debt levels.

I will grant that the 90% debt/gdp trigger is most likely non-existent, but the rest of their book does yeoman's work in cataloging financial crises. It's a useful antidote to the mass psychological amnesia that is perpetually recurring. "Our new investments our safe and returns will never fall" inevitably leads to "what perfidy caused this?" The cycle has been repeated in remarkably similar ways for nearly a millenium now. We should appreciate the detailed financial history they have created, and chide them for the dubious massaging of the data. Just don't overstate its political implications.

about a year ago
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Zuckerberg Lobbies For More Liberal Immigration Policies

explosivejared Re:education (484 comments)

Immigration is good for everyone, though especially for immigrants. Immigrants experience massive wage gains just by stepping over an imaginary line. Nations that receive immigrants receive solid overall growth benefits.

H1-B visas never fail to bring out the nationalist grief on /.. There is a fallacy that there is a set amount of technology work to do, and if you increase the labor supply, that makes everyone worse off. The labor supply is actually endogenous to the demand for labor. More skilled labor allows people to be able to rely more on skilled labor. It's counterintuitive I know, but it absolutely is.

Population growth is also endogenous to technological advancement. Increasing the amount of people integrated in a society, increases the chance that we advance.

Endogenous growth theory, Paul Romer is going to win a Nobel prize for it one day. Learn it. Free movement of labor has been crucial to the advancement of humanity.

about a year ago
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US Postal Service Discontinuing Saturday Mail Delivery

explosivejared Re:It doesn't help... (582 comments)

The Post Office has successfully paid this $5 billion bill every year since it was passed in 2005. I'd say their business model is still wildly successful. Their problem, as previously pointed out, is that since the Republicans in Congress saddled them with these payments, the Postal Service has been unable to invest in further modernization.

So, since they've been required to actually pay what they promised their employees, unlike a lot of other pensions these days, they now can't make money. Huh. That doesn't strike me as the model of success we should be pushing for.

It might be a good investment to allow/encourage the post office to create a network of state issued email addresses, or whatever other scheme of modernization we might come up with. That's the kind of risky change that large bureaucratic organizations with massive legacy labor costs typically aren't good at. I'm all for letting them experiment. I'm not for throwing money at or trying to force a revival an archaic model of 6-day-a-week service for fewer and fewer first class mail and more and more direct marketing.

about a year and a half ago
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US Postal Service Discontinuing Saturday Mail Delivery

explosivejared Re:It doesn't help... (582 comments)

Making money on junk mail! That's hardly the romantic vision of an efficient, broad reaching government agency that binds us all together that people weep over now that the Post Office is in trouble. Sure, the post office could radically remake itself, as a poster downthread suggested. The old way of doing things 6 days a week, universal letter service, while employing hundreds of thousands of low skill workers is dead. We can save the brand, but not the old system.

about a year and a half ago
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US Postal Service Discontinuing Saturday Mail Delivery

explosivejared Re:It doesn't help... (582 comments)

It's true that the Post Office is required to pre-fund its pensions in a burdensome way. That doesn't change the fact that their current setup is not economic. First class mail is declining in usage, but direct marketing through the mail has consistently, and for a long time, increased as a source of revenue. Face it, letters have diminished in importance. People are weeping over a shell of a former institution. The Post Office is just chasing the advertising dollars like everyone else seems to be.

about a year and a half ago
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China Blocks Google.com, Gmail, Maps and More During 18th Party Congress

explosivejared Re:Good. (129 comments)

Yeah, probably not, at least not in any predictable way. There are a million things that popular opinion and unrest within China make more likely to be reformed: the Hukou system, land distribution, criminal justice, etc. Single party rule and stringent censorship just don't motivate the Chinese like westerners constantly tell them that it should. I'm of the opinion all of this is a tremendous waste, but I don't expect any majority of the Chinese public to agree with me any time soon.

about a year and a half ago
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China Blocks Google.com, Gmail, Maps and More During 18th Party Congress

explosivejared Pretty Conventional (129 comments)

Ratcheting up Internet restrictions is the norm during times like this. Expect VPN's in-country to also be strangely slower.

What's interesting to me are the new unconventional methods of restraint China always seems to be a pioneer in. It seems protesters throwing leaflets out of taxi cabs is a growing fear, so taxis are restricted in being able to travel around Tiananmen and will their windows locked, with some having control handles removed altogether.

I was present in China during the Arab Spring, when it was feared protest would spread. Any mention of a meetup place for protesters would all of a sudden shoot up the priority list for construction repairs. Many areas were cordoned off with armadas of street sweet sweepers.

Paranoia is an extremely inefficient use of ingenuity.

about a year and a half ago
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NY Attorney General Subpoenas Craigslist For Post-Sandy Price Gougers

explosivejared Re:Supply and demand (458 comments)

The interesting thing about this whole episode is that, despite no obvious interventions by the state, the market itself failed to raise prices to clear the market.

In shortages like this, the logistics of gasoline make it difficult to really up capacity even by significant price raises. The gasoline market is highly segmented. It's not very easy to divert supplies from elsewhere and ship gasoline in the quantities needed, unlike with things like food and water.

What "price gouging" can do, however, is eliminate hoarding and frivolous use. $8.00 a gallon really makes you think twice whether you need that generator running 24 hours a day. That can help to calm down the shortage.

The puzzling thing is that gas stations seem to be much to afraid of being seen reaping a windfall profit by raising prices. So instead, we get lines miles long, essentially a gasoline lottery.

about a year and a half ago
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All of Nate Silver's State-Level Polling Predictions Proved True

explosivejared Re:Math (576 comments)

; but the chances of the poll averages being wrong in this case were incredibly small.

I'm not sure that's exactly knowable. Sure, the numbers are way better than contradictory pundit guts, but for instance, we had no way of knowing if a "Bradley Effect" would have been in play. Response rates for polling firms consistently came in below 10%. Polling is getting harder and harder in an age where fewer people have landlines and polling cell phones is restricted. As of now, state polls are good guides. They will be right up until they aren't, and then the science will change.

I'm not saying that the probability of systematic error is large, just unknowable. It was a perfectly reasonable and scientific position for a Republican to say "Romney's chances are equal to the probability of error in the polls, and I hope that probability is large."

about a year and a half ago
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All of Nate Silver's State-Level Polling Predictions Proved True

explosivejared Re:Seriously... (576 comments)

Romney's own internal numbers had Obama up by 5 in Ohio the weekend before the election even.

about a year and a half ago
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All of Nate Silver's State-Level Polling Predictions Proved True

explosivejared Re:But when? (576 comments)

Exactly. Neither Nate nor any of the many other poll aggregators (Sam Wang, Drew Linzer, etc.) have found any way to conquer the inherit unpredictability of political events far into the future. Read Daniel Kahnemann. Experts, no matter how "scientific" their methods are consistently wrong and worse at predicting politics far into the future than the proverbial dart throwing monkey.

We care about Nate Silver and people that do what he does for two reasons: 1) They definitively point out that most pundits are full of crap and unwilling to realize that polling, not their guts, describe what's happening in the short run in the most accurate way currently possible. 2) For partisan reasons. Democrats love Silver because his numbers provided a security blanket to liberals afraid for Obama. To be fair, had the election turned out different and Nate's numbers called it for Romney, Republicans would be lionizing him as well, and we'd all be mocking whatever the Democratic version of "Unskewed Polls" had been. That popular media figures skew left really helps Silver's celebrity this time around.

about a year and a half ago
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USGS Suggests Connection Between Seismic Activity and Fracking

explosivejared Re:Wiggle room indeed (145 comments)

I'm no geologist, but I have learned a bit of stats.

In Oklahoma, the rate of M >= 3 events abruptly increased in 2009 from 1.2/year in the previous half-century to over 25/year. This rate increase is exclusive of the November 2011 M 5.6 earthquake and its aftershocks.

A twenty-five-fold increase, that excludes the largest outlying event, in the number of earthquakes would seem to be statistically significant of something.

more than 2 years ago
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USGS Suggests Connection Between Seismic Activity and Fracking

explosivejared Re:Oh Great. (145 comments)

Putting aside the possible implication that you think science should censor politically unsavory findings and renege on its mission, this won't be like other warnings from scientists. Climate is a big impersonal force that's hard to grasp. It unfolds slowly and is hard to really "experience" first hand. A tripling of the number of earthquakes in the midwest is, shall we say, slightly more visceral.

more than 2 years ago
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USGS Suggests Connection Between Seismic Activity and Fracking

explosivejared Re:Can it prevent large earthquakes? (145 comments)

I'm generally in favor exploring geo-engineering. Since, does anyone really expect to get China and India(the greatest sources of future emissions) to postpone carbon intensive growth through treaties? Inducing earthquakes seems much more dangerous than any scheme that involves adding reflective particles to the atmosphere. Engineering the atmosphere, as tough and uncertain as that is, is made easier by the fact that gases introduced to the upper atmosphere will fade in effect on a reasonable time scale and the faucet can be turned at off at any time. Fracturing the crust is much more permanent. It could be earthquakes now, but magma popping up in the middle of Cleveland later. There's no way to put the rock back together.

more than 2 years ago
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How To Share a Cake Over the Internet

explosivejared Pie in the sky (123 comments)

Cutting up a cake might not sound like an important problem but if you rephrase it as sharing resources or territory, then you can quickly see that it has lots of practical applications.

This seems like a pretty interesting game, fit for nerd parties and the like. Solving territorial or resource disputes? Not so much. You and your friends are basically equal. State actors, ethnic groups, etc. tend not to be perfectly equal. For example, I doubt the Sunni insurgency in Iraq would have submitted to such an auction. The same goes for the actors in the South China Sea, Israel Palestine, really any territorial dispute of note.

I could see something like this being useful for divvying things like mineral resources that crop in international waters, like all those manganese nodes on the ocean floor.

more than 2 years ago
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Amazon Pays No UK Income Tax, Under Investigation

explosivejared Re:Taxes and trade are complicated (175 comments)

... despite the fact that in my grandfather's day only the rich paid federal income tax.

Your grandfather must have lived in the roaring twenties then. Through most of the middle of the 20th century that wasn't the case, but, surprisingly, income taxes are more generous to the bottom quintile. The income tax rate in America has gotten more and more progressive over the last few decades with the introduction of the EITC, as the bottom quintile receives more and more money

more than 2 years ago
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Amazon Pays No UK Income Tax, Under Investigation

explosivejared Re:Taxes and trade are complicated (175 comments)

Would you care to share your theory of what constitutes a taxable event when trade occurs across the borders of nations that have banded together to form a free trade zone?

more than 2 years ago
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Amazon Pays No UK Income Tax, Under Investigation

explosivejared Re:Taxes and trade are complicated (175 comments)

Well, if indeed it is legal, then there's nothing wrong with it.

The article says that the UK government is investigating, but if Amazon is found to owe these taxes, it would be a matter for the European courts to decide. I have a feeling this is sort of a novel issue. Obviously I'd have to defer to someone that had the relevant case law or EU regulation handy. Either way, this is not something the UK just gets to declare legal or not.

more than 2 years ago
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Amazon Pays No UK Income Tax, Under Investigation

explosivejared Taxes and trade are complicated (175 comments)

It would be really difficult to structure a tax with the incidence falling solely on setups like the one Amazon has here, especially since the UK is part of the single market. This is most likely an issue that would have to be solved in the European Courts rather than by the UK government. I doubt that a few hundred million pounds in lost tax revenue would persuade the courts to force a major restructuring of trade. I am not expert on European jurisprudence though.

This is a legitimately complex issue of tax avoidance. Most of the time when people howl about corporations paying low effective tax rates it's because they don't realize all of the exemptions for favored industries (green and bio tech, aerospace, etc.) and absorbing losses create that outcome. Here we have a government stretched thin on revenues up against the framework of European economic integration.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Tens of Millions of Dollars Worth of BTC Stolen from Sheep Marketplace

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  about 8 months ago

explosivejared (1186049) writes "Sheep Marketplace, a .onion marketplace that sprung up in the wake of the Silk Road seizure, closed down over the weekend after nearly 100 thousand BTC, worth around $100 million, were stolen. The market had been plagued by suspicion for weeks, and it all came to a head last week as admins began disallowing withdrawal of bitcoins in escrow. Users revolted. The forum was shutdown. Admins claimed a bug allowed 5,000 BTC to be stolen. Eventually the entire site went down, taking tens of millions of dollars worth BTC with it. It is still unclear who is responsible, but reddit user sheepreloaded2 claims to have identified the wallet containing the stolen bitcoins and has been frustrating attempts to launder them."
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Reddit Investigates the Boston Bombing

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  about a year ago

explosivejared (1186049) writes "Reddit users have formed a crowdsourced effort to compile photos and trade theories about the Boston Marathon bombing on Monday. There's always a worry that moves like this might turn into mob-led witch hunts, but cooler heads seem to be prevailing. A post warning people of repeating the mistakes made surrounding the accusations of Richard Jewell has been voted to the top of the findbostonbombers reddit. Of particular interest is the subreddit on analysis of the bomb components. Users seem to have established the type of trigger used and may be able to establish a radius that the bomber(s) may have been within during the blast"
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The Internet and Its Lessons for Hierarchies and Social Movements

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  about a year and a half ago

explosivejared writes "Evgeny Morozov in the newest issue of The New Republic uses a highly critical review of Steven Johnson's book Future Perfect push back against what Morozov terms "internet-centrism" or the belief that the Internet has it's own internal logic of decentralization that has obviated older, hierarchical organizational structures. Now Johnson has replied, and the subsequent debate is online.

With the conversation between Morozov and Johnson as a starting point, I'd like to pose some questions to /.. I think we can all agree that the internet has proven that decentralized organizations can bring significant positive impacts, but what are the limits on this? As Morozov points out, even in ostensibly decentralized organizations there are often hidden hierarchies, and this is true for the Internet as well. Where could the vast, varied phenomenon we call the internet benefit from more openly centralized organization, if it can at all?"

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Using Radio Waves to Bake Tumors

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 2 years ago

explosivejared writes "From the article:

Nanothermal therapy – the use of nanoparticles to cook a tumor to death – is one of the many promising uses of nanotechnology to both improve the effectiveness of cancer therapy and reduce its side effects. Now, a team of investigators from the Texas Center for Cancer Nanomedicine has shown that liver cancer cells will take up targeted gold nanoparticles, absorb radio waves, and generate heat that damages the cells. In addition, the researchers have discovered how to increase the thermal toxicity of these nanoparticles."

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The Shifting Tides of International Science

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 3 years ago

explosivejared writes "The Economist has a story on the increasing scientific productivity countries like China, India, and Brazil relative to the field's old guards in America, Europe, and Japan. Scientific productivity in this sense includes percent of GDP spent on R&D and the overall numbers of researchers, scholarly articles, and patents that a country produces. The article sees this as a natural side effect of the buoying economic prospects of these countries. Perhaps the most positive piece of the story is the fact that a full 35% of scholarly scientific articles in leading journals are now the product of international collaboration. From the article: "[M]ore than 35% of articles in leading journals are now the product of international collaboration. That is up from 25% 15 years ago—something the old regime and the new alike can celebrate.""
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Rogue Black Holes May Roam the Milky Way

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 5 years ago

explosivejared writes "It sounds like the plot of a sci-fi movie: rogue black holes roaming our galaxy, threatening to swallow anything that gets too close. In fact, new calculations by Ryan O'Leary and Avi Loeb (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) suggest that hundreds of massive black holes, left over from the galaxy-building days of the early universe, may wander the Milky Way.

Good news, however: Earth is safe. The closest rogue black hole should reside thousands of light-years away. Astronomers are eager to locate them, though, for the clues they will provide to the formation of the Milky Way. "These black holes are relics of the Milky Way's past," said Loeb. "You could say that we are archaeologists studying those relics to learn about our galaxy's history and the formation history of black holes in the early universe." According to theory, rogue black holes originally lurked at the centers of tiny, low-mass galaxies. Over billions of years, those dwarf galaxies smashed together to form full-sized galaxies like the Milky Way."

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Hawking Expecting to Make Full Recovery

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 5 years ago

explosivejared writes "Yesterday we discussed the medical scare that physicist Stephen Hawking was going through. Happily, his website has posted a succinct statement that he is being kept for observation, but he is comfortable and expecting a full recovery."
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Why Google is the New Pirate Bay

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 5 years ago

explosivejared writes "Forbes is running a story discussing the verdict in the Pirate Bay case and its implications on file sharing, specifically with regard to Google. The article points out what most on /. already realize: Google provides essentially the same service that the Pirate Bay does. The Pirate Bay case may be far from over, accounting for appeals, but the Pirate Bay's assumption of being unchallengeable was shattered. The article raises the question of whether or not Google is untouchable in the matter. The story is quick to point out how the situation resembles a futile game of cat mouse, but given how the Pirate Bay's confidence was ultimately broken, is Google untouchable?"
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Software "Mind Gym" Used to Treat Schizoph

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 5 years ago

explosivejared writes "New Scientist is running a story about a software based regimen of mental exercise used to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia that other treatments, like drugs, cannot reach.

From the article: BRAIN training in a computerised mind gym could help people with schizophrenia cope with the debilitating cognitive problems caused by the condition.

This is not the first attempt to use computer tools to treat the cognitive problems that come with schizophrenia, but it is more intensive than earlier efforts. Each volunteer did about 50 hours of brain training over 10 weeks. The approach is also unusual because it initially focuses on improving a person's ability to process sensory information, before honing higher-level cognitive processing.
"
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Quantum Theory May Explain Wishful Thinking

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 5 years ago

explosivejared writes "Humans don't always make the most rational decisions. As studies have shown, even when logic and reasoning point in one direction, sometimes we chose the opposite route, motivated by personal bias or simply "wishful thinking." This paradoxical human behavior has resisted explanation by classical decision theory for over a decade. But now, scientists have shown that a quantum probability model can provide a simple explanation for human decision-making — and may eventually help explain the success of human cognition overall."
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Egalitarian revolution in the Pleistocene?

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 5 years ago

explosivejared writes "Although anthropologists and evolutionary biologists are still debating this question, a new study, published in the open-access journal PLoS ONE, supports the view that the first egalitarian societies may have appeared tens of thousands of years before the French Revolution, Marx, and Lenin.

These societies emerged rapidly through intense power struggle and their origin had dramatic implications for humanity. In many mammals living in groups, including hyenas, meerkats, and dolphins, group members form coalitions and alliances that allow them to increase their dominance status and their access to mates and other resources. Alliances are especially common in great apes, some of whom have very intense social life, where they are constantly engaged in a political maneuvering as vividly described in Frans de Waal's "Chimpanzee politics".

In spite of this, the great apes' societies are very hierarchical with each animal occupying a particular place in the existing dominance hierarchy. A major function of coalitions in apes is to maintain or change the dominance ranking. When an alpha male is well established, he usually can intimidate any hostile coalition or the entire community. In sharp contrast, most known hunter-gatherer societies are egalitarian. Their weak leaders merely assist a consensus-seeking process when the group needs to make decisions, but otherwise all main political actors behave as equal. Some anthropologists argue that in egalitarian societies the pyramid of power is turned upside down with potential subordinates being able to express dominance over potential alpha-individuals by creating large, group-wide political alliance."

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Drug Ads Shown to Have Little Impact

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 4 years ago

explosivejared writes "Marketplace is running a story on the apparently sparse effectiveness of direct-to-consumer drug ads. The pharmaceutical industry spends billions of dollars on direct-to-consumer advertising, but a Harvard Medical School study says the ads aren't really working. Researchers say that even when new drug therapies are introduced, direct-to-consumer advertising for the drug, there is only an initial slight "uptick" in sales."
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A New Boom in Undersea Fiber

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 6 years ago

explosivejared writes "The Economist has a write up on the coming boom in undersea cable infrastructure. Firms are expected to spend at least $7 billion over the next three years on new cables. These new investments are the first major expansions since the dot-com bust left telecoms with a load of fancy new fiber but no deluge of traffic to glean profits from. Even though three quarters of undersea fiber is still dark, the article says that along with the forecast for drastic increases in traffic, insuring redundancy is also important to those investing in new cables."
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The Broadband Prouductivity "Myth"

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 6 years ago

explosivejared writes "The Economist is running an article that challenges what it calls the "myth" of increased access to broadband access leading to increased productivity across an economy. The article is frank when it says that, "'bigger is better broadband' is orthodoxy, not economics." The reason cited in the article is that so far only media and entertainment deliverers have effectively harnessed the power of high bandwidth on a large scale. Other than that, nobody in the rest of the business world has quite figured out how to use broadband to make a real change in productivity.

So, other than for the infamous Linux .iso's that everyone shares 24 hours a day, maybe Gates only need adjust his immortal 640k comment a little, to say 1.5 mb maybe? I joke, but the article does raise an interesting point."
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Dialectic on Publicly Funded Research

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 6 years ago

explosivejared writes "Reason Magazine online is running an article on the "The Failure of Centralized Scientific Planning." The article is a review of a book, Sex, Science and Profits: How People Evolved to Make Money , on the subject of publicly funded research. The author of the article reinforces the main point of the book that public research has hindered scientific innovation. It makes some very imaginative historical links about private research yielding greater results than public research, going so far as to say that the Dark Ages brought about more innovation than the age of the Romans.

All in all, the article is a provocative read, if not an outright polemic. I personally rejected most of the article's claims in my comment on the article's discussion page. Despite my rejection, the article still incites interesting debate about the fundamental questions regarding the value of public research. We are in a tightening economy and an election year, a recipe for great change in the amount of and commitment to public funding. So, where should we be headed with regards to publicly funded science?"
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Vote on British Embryo Research Bill

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 6 years ago

explosivejared writes "British lawmakers will debate Monday a bill which would allow scientists to use animal-human hybrid embryos in research after Prime Minister Gordon Brown passionately defended the controversial plan.

Brown reportedly takes a personal interest in the issue because his youngest son Fraser, aged nearly two, has cystic fibrosis, which could one day benefit from embryo research. But the Catholic Church and some opposition lawmakers are opposed to the bill, with one senior churchman warning it may lead to "Frankenstein" style experiments.

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill would give scientists a legal framework to create hybrid embryos, yielding stem cells which could be used in research into treating conditions like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

The bill also backs the idea of "saviour sibling" children, who are created as a close genetic match for a chronically ill brother or sister, meaning their genetic material can help treat them."

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Xbox360 Sales Outpacing Sales of the Original Xbox

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 6 years ago

explosivejared writes "From the article: According to official NPD data, which tracks North American console sales, the Xbox 360 took 30 months to reach the 10 million units sold milestone, 20 percent faster than the original Xbox, which didn't achieve the same mark until month 36.

So, is this a sign of success for the 360 or has the market changed so completely, voiding the comparison?"

Link to Original Source
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Made-to-Order Isotopes

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 6 years ago

explosivejared writes "From the article:
Designer labels have a lot of cachet — a principle that's equally true in fashion and physics. The future of nuclear physics is in designer isotopes — the relatively new power scientists have to make specific rare isotopes to solve scientific problems and open doors to new technologies, according to Bradley Sherrill, a University Distinguished Professor of physics and associate director for research at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University.

The chemical changes that brought about the formation of the elements in the bellies of stars are being recreated in laboratories such as MSU's NSCL. Advances in basic nuclear science already have given way to technologies such as PET scans — medical procedures that use special isotopes to target specific types of tumors.
"

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Plans for a Probe Closer to the Sun Than Ever

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 6 years ago

explosivejared writes "NASA has tapped the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory to develop the ambitious Solar Probe mission, which will study the streams of charged particles the sun hurls into space from a vantage point within the sun's corona — its outer atmosphere — where the processes that heat the corona and produce solar wind occur. At closest approach Solar Probe would zip past the sun at 125 miles per second, protected by a carbon-composite heat shield that must withstand up to 2,600 degrees Fahrenheit and survive blasts of radiation and energized dust at levels not experienced by any previous"
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'Smart' Power Meters are the Wave of the Future

explosivejared explosivejared writes  |  more than 6 years ago

explosivejared writes "Utilities are now testing pricing schemes for power that vary with demand. These new pricing schemes are made possible by the ability that utilities now have to gather data about power usage in real time, from so-called 'smart' meters. The article showcases one man, Darrell Brubaker, who effectively used the new program from his utility and adjusted his power usage accordingly to save money. Some of the measures he took include running major appliances at night and cooking on the grill.

The article posits that these new real-time capabilities are already poised to revolutionize the grid. However, there are some that oppose the shift from the now conventional regimented monthly billing plans. Consumer advocacy groups warn that it would be a financial mistake for many to switch to a real-time rate."

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