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Ask Slashdot: What Good Print Media Is Left?

falconwolf The Economist (285 comments)

You won't get the US centric perspective that you get from the economist.

I am an American and only 2 American print magazines come as close as The Economist does to my pov. Those are Reason magazine and Liberty magazine.

Falcon Wolf

about 6 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Good Print Media Is Left?

falconwolf Byte served its purpose well. (285 comments)

Long live Byte. Goodbye, Byte, Circuit Cellar, Pournelle, and so many other characters. Long live Ars Technica, Wired, GigaOm, and dozens of other sites like NetworkWorld, InfoWorld, The Register, and so forth. Print will never come back. You won't feel it in your hands until your foldable smartphone makes this comfy some day in the future-- to do again.

I loved reading Byte! starting from the beginning. Reading what hardware and software hackers, who followed hacker ethics not the criminals called hackers in the press today, were doing was terrific. My two favorite columns were Steve Ciarcia's Circuit Cellar, which is now a compleat magazine of it's own, and Jerry Pournelle's Chaos Manor.

Falcon Wolf

about 6 months ago
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Student Records Kids Who Bully Him, Then Gets Threatened With Wiretapping Charge

falconwolf Re:Rewarding the bullies... (798 comments)

As children most cops and most judges were the bullies. For that matter, so were a lot of school administrators. They don't understand the problem, or that there even is a problem. I was suspended for finally hitting back in junior high school, and almost expelled when I did it a second time.

Do you have data to prove that? If so share it.

Falcon Wolf

about 6 months ago
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Student Records Kids Who Bully Him, Then Gets Threatened With Wiretapping Charge

falconwolf Re:Rewarding the bullies... (798 comments)

And, what if this kid commits a Columbine-esque revenge scenario?

Appropriately, the page with TFA has an ad encouraging me to "Win an AR-15 from Sebastian Ammo". Google is getting scary...

I have the same ad, and it's not from Google. The link is to another page on the same site. Now that page does have a Google ad, about slimming fat wallets.

As for the action taken by the school, one really has to wonder as to what kind of cretins make up the school administration. And what they could possibly have hoped to achieve by filing charges, other than a nasty (and well deserved) publicity backlash? Although for a society run by lawyers, that's perhaps what one would expect. Squeaky wheel gets a beating, and a teenager gets hauled in front of a judge on charges of "disorderly conduct" in a school. Seriously... Can any of the officials involved in this case look in the mirror and tell themselves that they are doing the Right Thing?

Agreed.

Falcon Wolf

about 6 months ago
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Climate Scientist: Climate Engineering Might Be the Answer To Warming

falconwolf Re:nuclear power means unintended geoengineering (343 comments)

Accidents happen, yes, but nuclear is still arguably the safest (deaths/TWh) form of energy on the planet: http://www.forbes.com/sites/ja... Even wind, hydro and solar are more dangerous.

If left to market forces, and not state planners, the markets would not build nuclear power plants. Nuclear power is Hooked on Subsidies. Notice how that is a CATO Institute reprint of a "Forbes" article first published on November 26, 2007. And in case you don't know what CATO is, from their about page "The Cato Institute is a public policy research organization — a think tank – dedicated to the principles of individual liberty, limited government, free markets and peace. Its scholars and analysts conduct independent, nonpartisan research on a wide range of policy issues."

FalconWolf

about 6 months ago
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UN: Renewables, Nuclear Must Triple To Save Climate

falconwolf Re:Nuclear? (433 comments)

At this point Greenpeace is as stuck in its position of advocating against Nuclear Energy as the NRA is against gun control, and they are both looking like obstacles to any positive change in the status quo

I oppose taxpayers paying for nuclear power. Actually I advocate eliminating all subsidies. And don't think energy companies aren't subsidized. Allocation of subsidies in the United States lists some subsidies different energy producers received between 1950 and 2010. Nuclear power received $73 billion in federal subsidies. "BusinessWeek" has the article When It Comes to Government Subsidies, Dirty Energy Still Cleans Up date 21 October 2012..

I also support the NRA and their stance on gun controls. The only effective gun control is when the shooter hits what they aim at. And if they hit someone they should pay for it. I find it ironic the first "environmentalists", those who cared for the environment, were conservationists and hunters. Now how can hunters be environmentalists? They kill wildlife. Guess what, they also want the environment that that wildlife lives in to be clean and not polluted. Teddy Roosevelt was an avid hunter who as president created the National Park Service. He wanted to preserve wild lands for hunting among other reasons. Many hunters supported this too.

FalconWolf

about 6 months ago
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UN: Renewables, Nuclear Must Triple To Save Climate

falconwolf France has done really well with nuclear. (433 comments)

France has not done well with nuclear power. Sure they get most of their electricity from nuclear power plants, however despite their lead in reprocessing France still has trouble with storage. While reprocessing allows spent fuel to be reused and shortens it's half-life doing so creates toxins and hotter fuel.

As far as building nuclear power plants go state planners on free market determines what gets built. CATO, that is the institute "dedicated to the principles of individual liberty, limited government, free markets and peace" printed the article "Hooked on Subsidies that was first published in the November 26, 2007 issue of "Forbes". The opening statements is "Why conservatives should join the left’s campaign against nuclear power." Further down it says:
"How do France (and India, China and Russia) build cost-effective nuclear power plants? They don’t. Governmental officials in those countries, not private investors, decide what is built. Nuclear power appeals to state planners, not market actors."

Now if private businesses want to build nuclear power plants they should get, and pay for, their own insurance. They would also have to finance the construction, not government. I might even invest in such a company that uses thorium as it's fuel. Provided the finances come out good.

FalconWolf

about 6 months ago
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Google Fiber's Austin, Texas Rollout Confirmed

falconwolf Re:Why not Houston? (128 comments)

Had you read my previous response in this very thread, you'd have noticed I was talking about metro Chicago.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Metropolitan_Area

That post must of been below mine. Am I supposed to read all posts before replying? Now interestingly the wiki article you link to says that the Chicago area encloses parts of 3 different states, Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin. While I thought the greater Chicago area may include Gary, Indiana, I didn't know it included any of Wisconsin.

So, to follow up, can a person take public transit to go from Wisconsin to Gary, Indiana? That is other than Greyhound and other national or regional transportation systems? After all your reply was about public transit. And the Greater Houston is also 10,000 sq miles.

Since we're considering metro areas, why don't we expand that to include Megalopolis (city type)? Then Chicago is only a part of the Great Lakes Megalopolis.

Falcon

about a year and a half ago
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Google Fiber's Austin, Texas Rollout Confirmed

falconwolf Re:Why not Houston? (128 comments)

And yet Chicago, roughly 10,000 square miles, manages to do so nicely (contrary to what locals bitch about).

The Chicago area is 234 sq miles (606.1 km). Jacksonville, FL at 885 sq miles (2,292 km) is the largest city in the 48 contiguous states and is more than twice Chicago's size but still is not nearly as big as 10,000 square miles.

Falcon

about a year and a half ago
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Google Fiber's Austin, Texas Rollout Confirmed

falconwolf Re:is it worth it? (128 comments)

I'm not sure what you're arguing with me about; this all started with me coming up with a use for which 1Gbit is useful. You make it sound like I'm saying we should all stick with 5Mbps cable modems, when I'm saying exactly the opposite.

I am arguing with your statement that "You can actually back up all your stuff to another machine across the Internet in a reasonable amount of time." As I've said twice, and will again, that statement depends on how "reasonable amount of time" is defined.

Falcon

about a year and a half ago
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Google Fiber's Austin, Texas Rollout Confirmed

falconwolf Re:is it worth it? (128 comments)

With 1Gbit upstream, your 750GB hard drive could be completely transferred in something like two hours.

And my 3TB drive? 8 hours? My 4 TB drive would take more than 10 hours. So again "You can actually back up all your stuff to another machine across the Internet in a reasonable amount of time" depends on how "reasonable amount of time" is defined. Of course 4TB is what I have now, who knows how big my storage will be in 1, 2, or 5 years? Saying "1Gbit upstream is reasonable" is just as ridiculous as saying "nobody will ever need 640KB of memory". Nobody can accurately see what the future will bring. That is except for a supernatural supreme deity, which I don't believe in.

Falcon

about a year and a half ago
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Google Fiber's Austin, Texas Rollout Confirmed

falconwolf Re:is it worth it? (128 comments)

You can actually back up all your stuff to another machine across the Internet in a reasonable amount of time.

That depends on how "reasonable amount of time" is defined. I have a 750 GB hard disc drive in the PC I'm typing this on and it is mostly full. I want to replace the PC with another, as my main computer. Currently I use a 3 TB external drive for backups, along with smaller drives too. I have another PC I want to use as my main PC, it has a 120 GB HDD as well as a second HDD that's 4 TB. The first drive is for the OSes used and software to run so the second one is for my data. Of course as it's a laptop I can and will still use this PC. But I do not expect to use the internet to transfer my data for storage and backups.

Falcon

about a year and a half ago
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Google Fiber's Austin, Texas Rollout Confirmed

falconwolf Re:a national roll out is only 100 years away (128 comments)

In the very announcement they link to the FCC broadband page about how to build out your own community gigabit municipal fiber network. You don't have to wait for Google. They would rather you didn't.

What FCC broadband page? I didn't see a link this.

Falcon

about a year and a half ago
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Google Fiber's Austin, Texas Rollout Confirmed

falconwolf Re:a national roll out is only 100 years away (128 comments)

In the very announcement they link to the FCC broadband page about how to build out your own community gigabit municipal fiber network. You don't have to wait for Google. They would rather you didn't.

What FCC broadband page would that be? The only FCC page I found linked to is WCB Announces Workshop on Gigabit Community Broadband Networks but it does not say how to build gigabit fiber. It may be in the video on the page, but that is more than 5 hours long. Searching FCC how to build gigabit municipal fiber networks doesn't return the how to either in the first five pages of results. Only the first result is an FCC link.

Falcon

Should there be a Law?

about a year and a half ago
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Google Fiber's Austin, Texas Rollout Confirmed

falconwolf kansas city gives it up for google...., (128 comments)

kansas city gives it up for google...., provides the first, third, and last paragraph of six paragraphs on what Kansas City gave up to Google printed in a Harper's Magazine article of the same title. The online article is only available to magazine subscribers.

In the second paragraph there's this:
"According to its contract, Kansas City must give Google access to its underground conduits, fiber, poles, rack space, nodes, buildings, facilities, and available land. It cannot charge the company for 'access to, or use of any city facilities...nor will it impose any permit and inspection fees.' And what does the city get in return? It has no say in the pricing of Google's services, nor can it ensure that Google will deliver fiber-optic service to all of the city's residents. Google's offices, meeting spaces, and showrooms are provided free of charge, and the city pays the company's electric bill. The major, moreover, is barred from commenting on Google's activities without the express permission of Google."

The Harper's page linked to does have this correction, "The space the company maintains in city-owned buildings is indeed free; its other local facilities are privately rented." Otherwise it appears Google is getting more than Kansas City is getting in return. And that does not count all the marketing data Google gains with all the eyeballs of surfers.

Falcon

about a year and a half ago
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Windfarm Sickness Spreads By Word of Mouth

falconwolf Re:California power crisis of 2000 and 2001 (482 comments)

You're playing semantic games as well as lying about what others say. This is my last reply to you.

Falcon

about a year and a half ago
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Windfarm Sickness Spreads By Word of Mouth

falconwolf And where's your evidence of this? It is not clear (482 comments)

To get an idea, consider the energy output of a windmill and divide it by the span of the prop to get the amount of energy removed per centimetre of length, assuming the width is about the same all the way is good enough. That puts it at the scale of a small fragile bat. The number you get is very small because it is less than the pressure of the prevailing wind on an area the size of a bat since you can't get all the energy out of the wind due to bearing friction etc.
Now do you see why I am dismissing the "bats killed by pressure drop" stupid bullshit as the PR campaign lie it is? It's the sort of thing that sounds OK initially due to technical terms thrown in to hide the really stupid lie, but if you think about how a windmill works the audacious lie is apparent. People caught out with it are also likely to be embarrassed that they fell for something so stupid so it's hard to talk them out of it.

I don 't know if the length is directly proportional to the amount of energy captured by wind mills. I bet the area of the blade, as well as it's pitch, is more important. Oh, and obviously the height. The bottom of the blades are supposed to be higher than the tallest thing that can block the wind. That includes trees. And I bet that that is higher than most bats will be flying.

And no I don't expect your explanation as to why you dismiss the "bats killed by pressure drop" as stupid bullshit. For all I know what you said was bullshit. More of the NIMBY shit delaying wind farms, even off the coast. You still did not provide evidence which is what I asked for. Can you provide scientific studies supporting your position? That is what I'm looking for.

Now here are some of the things I found:

That's 5 links to science to your zero links. I found those by Googling wind turbines danger to bats pressure. All results are in the top 6, I didn't use the second result which was from the New York Times as it may be too biased for some people. I didn't even click on the link to read it.

Falcon

about a year and a half ago
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Windfarm Sickness Spreads By Word of Mouth

falconwolf Re:California power crisis of 2000 and 2001 (482 comments)

Your claim was that by deregulating the producers and distributors but leaving the *existing* price caps on the cost to consumers, the industry went aground.

I made no such claim. Throughout this thread I have said the opposite, that CA did not deregulate energy. "Deregulating the producers" is only partial, not full, deregulation. I have stated the state dropped some regulations but made new regulations too. That is reregulation, which I have been stating throughout though I admit I did not use the word "reregulation".

I think it's pretty obvious people either don't or can't read and if they do read they don't understand what they read. They also make ridiculous or outrageous claims about what others did say.

Falcon

about a year and a half ago

Submissions

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Google to offer $70 Fiber in Kansas City

falconwolf falconwolf writes  |  more than 2 years ago

falconwolf writes "In Kansas City Google Fiber will offer broadband internet access as well as TV service with gigabit speeds for less than Comcast's new 305Mbps service. Gigabit+TV costing $120 a month offers a "full TV lineup" and uses the Nexus 7 tablet as the remote. Another $70 pays for Gigabit internet access. Together net access and TV will cost $190, more than $100 less than Comcast's $299 offering. A $10 pre-registration fee website has been opened by Google."
Link to Original Source
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Flying saucers in the sky

falconwolf falconwolf writes  |  about 4 years ago

falconwolf writes "Skylifter an Australian aeronautical firm is developing flying saucer shaped lifting balloons as a method to transport heavy cargo including possibly buildings and ships. The flying saucer shape has advantages over other dirigibles such as blimps. The cigar shape of blimps means they have to be pointed in the direction of travel whereas a saucer can travel in any direction. They can go where trains don't. And they don't need traffic cops for wide loads on the road."
Link to Original Source
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Emergency Internet control bill gets a rewrite

falconwolf falconwolf writes  |  more than 4 years ago

falconwolf writes "Sen. Jay Rockefeller alarmed technology and telecommunications firms last year when he announced a plan for the president to seize "emergency" control of the Internet. Now the West Virginia Democrat is trying again with a new version that aides hope will be seen as less extreme.

During a closed-door meeting on Capitol Hill on Wednesday attended by about a dozen industry representatives, CNET has learned, Rockefeller's staff pitched a revised version of his controversial cybersecurity legislation.

It says that after the president chooses to "declare a cybersecurity emergency," he can activate a "response and restoration plan" involving networks owned and operated by the private sector. In an attempt to limit criticism, instead of spelling out the plan's details, the latest draft simply says that it must be developed by the White House in advance.

There is no requirement that the emergency response plan be made public, meaning it could still include a forcible disconnection of critical Web sites from the Internet--which is what the March 2009 version of the legislation had proposed.

Larry Clinton, president of the Internet Security Alliance, whose members include Verisign, Verizon, and Raytheon, says no disconnection language is explicitly in the bill: "We are pleased that the 'kill switch' allowing for the government to shut down private sector access to the Internet has been eliminated."

But, Clinton said, "We think the bill still has a long way to go." If the private sector is expected to help out with national security, he said, there ought to be liability protections, insurance breaks, and tax credits for small businesses.

A spokesman for Rockefeller did not respond to repeated requests for comment on Wednesday. Sen. Olympia Snowe, a Maine Republican, is a co-sponsor of the legislation."

Link to Original Source
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Is Apple Your Overlord? The EFF Says Yes

falconwolf falconwolf writes  |  more than 4 years ago

falconwolf writes "JR Raphael, PC World, wrote:"

"It's not every day that you see a major tech company being called a "jealous and arbitrary feudal lord." Today, Apple holds that distinction. "

"The Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit digital rights advocacy group, has started a very public fight against Apple's notoriously controlling ways. The organization obtained a copy of Apple's license agreement for iPhone app developers — a document that, by the EFF's description, is carefully guarded from ever entering public view. "

"Knowing Apple's history of control — the company's methods are sometimes satirically compared to those of a communist regime, after all — the details of the developer agreement aren't entirely surprising. But seeing such strong remarks from a highly regarded rights organization is certainly something that grabs your attention. ""

Link to Original Source
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Couple gets married at Apple store in New York

falconwolf falconwolf writes  |  more than 4 years ago

falconwolf writes "The couple, from New York, said "iDo" at the city's Apple store on Fifth Avenue, at 12.01 on Valentine's Day in a ceremony dominated with the company's products and references to them.

The pair, who met in the Apple store, had their priest dressed as Steve Jobs, the company's chief executive, read their vows from their iPhones, while the rings were tied to a ribbon wrapped around a first generation iPod."

Link to Original Source
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IBM Said to Be in Talks to Buy Sun Microsystems

falconwolf falconwolf writes  |  more than 5 years ago

falconwolf writes "March 18 (Bloomberg) — International Business Machines Corp. is in talks to buy Sun Microsystems Inc., aiming to take out a smaller rival to gain a greater share of the computer- server market, according to people familiar with the situation."
Link to Original Source
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falconwolf falconwolf writes  |  more than 6 years ago

falconwolf writes "Dell has confirmed it. After over one hundred thousand responses to the survey, they listened, they questioned, and now they are going to provide. Dell will offer the Linux operating system on new laptops and desktops. More than seventy percent of survey respondents said they would use a Dell system with a Linux operating system for both home and office use. The hardware was selected and both laptops and desktops were picked, the customers have spoken and they want Linux no matter what they buy.

Support wise, the respondents to the survey said that existing community-based support forums would meet their technical support needs for a tested and validated Linux operating system on a Dell. They also indicated that improved hardware support for Linux is as important as the distribution(s) offered. In fact, most of the comments were centered around the drivers and hardware support on the recent Direct2Dell blog post.

Many who commented on the Linux proposal said that free software and drivers were important.Dell responded to that, "For device types where a choice exists between a component with a non-Free driver and one with Free driver availability, in our Linux offering we'll opt to bundle the component with the Free driver."

Addressing GPL based drivers Dell said, "Dell recognizes the importance of open source, GPL-licensed drivers which are maintained upstream in kernel.org. They allow users the widest choice of Linux distributions, effectively taking the specific hardware and distribution out of the decision-making process and let you focus on solving your business problems. We will work with our hardware partners to develop, test, and maintain Free drivers, and continue to make progress towards that goal for all drivers."

As the first OEM to mainstream Linux to the public, not just to the business world, other OEMs such as HP and Lenovo as well as Gateway, will be watching. This will either make or break Dell. However, with the support Linux has, then the venture might just be a viable one for Dell as it struggles to recover form several years worth of declining sales.

While Dell has mentioned several flavors of Linux as possible pre-installed operating systems, they have remained noncommittal on the subject. The rumor is that it will be Ubuntu as the distribution of choice while market watchers say Red Hat or SuSe Linux. The odds are in favor of Ubuntu or Debian. The last question really is price. Just how much will the new Linux computers cost? That is unknown at the moment, but they will likely be cheaper than the current Windows offering. Dell has said that they will seek customer feedback on the future open source projects. http://tech.monstersandcritics.com/news/article_12 84922.php/Dude_you%92re_getting_an_open-source_OS_ on_that_Dell!"
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falconwolf falconwolf writes  |  more than 7 years ago

falconwolf writes "Mac Envy Are Apple computers better than Windows PCs? The guy who led development of Microsoft's new versions of Windows apparently once thought so. In a January 2004 e-mail to Microsoft (nasdaq: MSFT — news — people ) chiefs Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer, Vista boss Jim Allchin said he would buy a Mac if he wasn't working at Microsoft. Allchin, who is now a co-president of Microsoft, was complaining to Gates and Ballmer that Microsoft had lost its way in developing Vista and lost sight of what customers wanted. The e-mail has become public since it was cited by attorneys in Iowa who are pursuing an antitrust case against Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft. Allchin oversaw development of Vista, the new version of Windows. The new operating system looks a lot like Apple (nasdaq: AAPL — news — people )'s OS X operating system. This hasn't escaped the notice of Apple executives who delight in pointing out similarities. On Monday night, after reporters began making inquiries about the e-mail, Allchin published an item on a Microsoft blog in which he claimed the e-mail statement was being taken out of context. He said that he'd made the comment about buying a Mac "for effect," that the e-mail was nearly 3 years old and that he was trying to shake things up at Microsoft. "We needed to change and change quickly," Allchin writes. Today, he says, "Vista has turned into a phenomenal product, better than any other OS we've ever built, and far, far better than any other software available today." Allchin has announced plans to retire from Microsoft after the commercial version of Vista ships at the end of January. Note to employees of Apple retail stores in Bellevue, Wash., and Seattle: On or around Feb. 1, be on the lookout for a white-haired man wearing a Groucho mask, furtively purchasing an iMac."

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