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The Rise and Fall of Supersymmetry

ferrisoxide.com Re:Article hard to read (138 comments)

It seems more optimised for smaller devices. Read fine on the phone, harder on a regular screen.

about a month and a half ago
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The Rise and Fall of Supersymmetry

ferrisoxide.com Re:String Theory will survive (138 comments)

So... we can both make pop references to String Theory? Win-win! Though yes, yours is more pithy.

about a month and a half ago
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The Rise and Fall of Supersymmetry

ferrisoxide.com String Theory will survive (138 comments)

By explaining that those extra supersymmetrical particles are actually packed away in really tiny dimensions that the LHC can't touch. Prove it aint so!

about a month and a half ago
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The JavaScript Juggernaut Rolls On

ferrisoxide.com Re:jscript (505 comments)

Just compile your Dart to JS (https://www.dartlang.org/docs/dart-up-and-running/contents/ch04-tools-dart2js.html). Then you can debug the generated code on ALL platforms :)

about 3 months ago
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The JavaScript Juggernaut Rolls On

ferrisoxide.com Re:Just goes to show... (505 comments)

Oh, you're no fun.. why can't we get all jihaddy from time to time. "The sports team from my general geographical location is better than yours" works for the general public. What's wrong with a bit of rough and tumble over each other's favourite programming language?

about 3 months ago
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The JavaScript Juggernaut Rolls On

ferrisoxide.com Re:Can the Slashdot mobile site get any worse? (505 comments)

Yeah.. wassup with that? The mobile version of slash seems to have gone away the last few days. Apologies for remaining off topic.

about 3 months ago
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The JavaScript Juggernaut Rolls On

ferrisoxide.com Re:Javascript is paradigm-free (505 comments)

Did I say Java? Sorry.. Javascript. Ah.. so easy to get them confused. Damn you Netscape Marketing Division - you got me again.

about 3 months ago
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The JavaScript Juggernaut Rolls On

ferrisoxide.com Re:I has a sad (505 comments)

The fact that there is a need for a book like this: http://shop.oreilly.com/produc...

Maybe? :) Still haven't found a "C - Just the Good Parts" book, but still looking.

about 3 months ago
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The JavaScript Juggernaut Rolls On

ferrisoxide.com Re:Javascript is paradigm-free (505 comments)

Why pick one when you can pick all three in the same application? :)

No, you're absolutely right - being able to choose a mode of programming is neat and Java does lend itself to doing neat things. But it still feels like a language that someone quickly hacked together. And the freedom to pick a paradigm means your fellow coders get to pick whatever happens to be in their clue bucket for the day. At least with a language that focuses on imperative or functional coding you can be reasonably sure that the guy sitting next to you has a similar view of reality as you do. "Multi-paradigm" is a bit like saying "post modern", with all the positive and negative connotations. I prefer my languages neo-classical :)

about 3 months ago
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The JavaScript Juggernaut Rolls On

ferrisoxide.com Re:I has a sad (505 comments)

In my 35 years of professional programming, getting good at dozens of languages, I've only run across 2 I've actively disliked. Javascript is one of them (tcl was the other). JS is a crap language that IMHO can't be fixed. If they ever add an honest garbage collector to the base language then most programs will delete themselves upon execution.

Lol. And the garbage collector would then send out an email to every web designer who says "I know how to code in Java" when they mean Javascript and clean up that confusion once and for all.

I've been forcing myself to get good at writing JS lately (if only because Node looks like it'll make all my other skills irrelevant in the web development market). It.. just.. feels.. wrong. Nothing in the language lends itself to building architectured solutions. Maybe the testing tools have caught up with other languages now, but you're still testing ugly code.

Javascript is the smallpox of coding languages. Maybe once it's finally eradicated Brendan Eich will only be remembered for this, the equally damaging Rust language and attempting to remove the marriage rights of same-sex couples in California. Hey, did I just politicise Javascript there? Flame on.

about 3 months ago
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Heat Waves In Australia Are Getting More Frequent, and Hotter

ferrisoxide.com Re:well the good news. (279 comments)

Well.. as everyone knows in this country, drop bears are if anything MORE aggressive during heatwaves. You rarely get reports of attacks during the winter months, but there's been a spate of deaths in the areas outside of Brisbane this summer - again, mostly visiting tourists who never seem to take the danger seriously.

about 3 months ago
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Heat Waves In Australia Are Getting More Frequent, and Hotter

ferrisoxide.com Re:Cue the global warming wackos! (279 comments)

You might want come up with a better term than "sheeple" - it makes you come across like a group-think zombie.

about 3 months ago
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Heat Waves In Australia Are Getting More Frequent, and Hotter

ferrisoxide.com Re:If you can't take the heat, (279 comments)

It's not the desert you schmuck. The city I live in was the hottest city on the planet yesterday. Air-conditioning was failing under the heat - not from lack of power but from the basic heat differential between outside and in. Trains had to run on reduced schedules, transport staff were handing out free water bottles so no-one dehydrates. It's crazy. The bush fire season has started in earnest, and houses near cities have been destroyed. This affects day-to-day living of people living in large cities (millions of people).

about 3 months ago
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Sherlock Holmes finally in the public domain in the US

ferrisoxide.com Typo (1 comments)

"where continuously developed" should be "were continuously developed". Tired and without my glasses when I wrote that.. though it should also extend copyright for a few precious minutes :)

about 4 months ago
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Ruby 2.1.0 Released

ferrisoxide.com Re:Trendy no more? (65 comments)

In respect to our Python-coding brothers and sisters, both Python and Ruby are very developer-friendly. Anyway, here is a nice comparison of the two languages' features: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1113611/what-does-ruby-have-that-python-doesnt-and-vice-versa

Obviously I prefer Ruby and to touch on the meta-programming aspect (whether good or evil), IMHO Ruby does a better job in this area. Mutable classes might give some people the heebie-jeebies, but it's saved my bacon several times. Ruby's Smalltalk-like message passing is sweet. Writing DSLs in Ruby is much more straightforward than in Python. There are many things to like.

Python gives you a nice sense of structure, but that can be a curse as well as it feels quite rigid. Most of the people I know who code in Python come from an engineering background, and that kinda makes sense to me. It feels like an engineering language. Ruby on the other hand is more fluid. It lends itself to more organic styles of coding.

The original AC post about "Ruby adds nothing to the existing languages" is clearly a troll, though I'd say the poster is right in a way. Ruby doesn't necessarily introduce anything new - it just puts it all together in the one place. Plus it's a joy to code in.

about 4 months ago
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Ruby 2.1.0 Released

ferrisoxide.com Re:Trendy no more? (65 comments)

Ah... but in my team we have a basic catch-cry: "Be nice to your future self". Plus all code is reviewed by other team members. So if you feel like doing something weird, someone will tap you and ask "what's all this mean?". But yes, thank you for the fix.

about 4 months ago
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Ruby 2.1.0 Released

ferrisoxide.com Re:Trendy no more? (65 comments)

Python is a great language aside from the whitespace.

But did you know you can add braces using the future module?

Next major release of Python will include braces, so you can get ready by doing this in your code:

>>> from __future__ import braces

Neat. Did not know this. Thanks for the clue.

about 4 months ago
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Ruby 2.1.0 Released

ferrisoxide.com Re:Trendy no more? (65 comments)

It's like any tool. Meta-programming, done well, lends to more readable code and neat shortcuts. See http://patshaughnessy.net/2010/2/20/getting-started-with-ruby-metaprogramming for an example.

Meta-programming done poorly can drive your co-workers to drink, especially if you've taken to using some clever-clever idiomatic re-use of common methods or operators that's not apparent to anyone outside your own head (possibly what your college prof. was taking issue with). Some legacy code that I've had to deal with in Ruby overloaded the << operator for an array, silently filtering out objects you were pushing in based on obscure criteria. And the comment left by the previous coder? "Magic goes here". Thank you, prick.

But I agree, using meta-programming to be "cute" should be frowned upon. I think of it as spice in your food. A sprinkle is good, too much will ruin your meal.

about 4 months ago

Submissions

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Sherlock Holmes finally in the public domain in the US

ferrisoxide.com ferrisoxide.com writes  |  about 4 months ago

ferrisoxide.com (1935296) writes "As reported on the Australian ABC news website, film-makers in the US are finally free to work on Sherlock Holmes stories without paying a licencing free to the estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle after a ruling by Judge Ruben Castillo.

A quirk of US copyright law kept 10 stories out of the public domain, on the basis that these stories where continuously developed. In his ruling Judge Castillo opined that only the "story elements" in the short stories published after 1923 were protected and that everything else in the Holmes canon was "free for public use" — including the characters of Holmes and Watson.

Holmes scholar Leslie Klinger, who challenged the estate, celebrated the ruling.

"Sherlock Holmes belongs to the world," Mr Klinger said in a statement posted on his Free Sherlock website.

IANAL, but the ruling of Judge Castillo that "adopting Conan Doyle's position would be to extend impermissibly the copyright of certain character elements of Holmes and Watson beyond their statutory period," is surely going to have implications across US copyright law. Mark Twain must be twisting and writhing in his grave."
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Kids more capable of understanding science than given credit for

ferrisoxide.com ferrisoxide.com writes  |  about a year ago

ferrisoxide.com writes "Physics and chemistry are the bane of many a high school student, but what if we're pitching the ideas to them too late? Can eight-year-olds absorb atomic theory? A former high-school physics teacher has asked that question in a bold experiment at a Brisbane primary school. And he says it shows young minds are much more advanced than we think."
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