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Comments

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Google Earth Finds Woman Trapped on Deserted Island for 7 Years

fleebait Hoax (1 comments)

Do a Google search on the name in the article.

about a month ago
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Dell Exec Calls HP's New 'Machine' Architecture 'Laughable'

fleebait Re:uh no (173 comments)

It might be just a little more than just a game changer.

Stop thinking about computers as boxes with wires, screens and disks, and start thinking about building the nervous system of a human being. Our bodies use distributed computing all over the place, with the vagus nervous system for the organs, with their own chemical memories, and feedback loops, the localized muscle memory systems for arms, legs, fingers, locally stored programs that run semi-autonomously.

If you read about memristors on Wikipedia, you can begin to see the possibilities of interfacing with biologic systems, and the newer bioligic chemical sensors within the organs, and appendages. Distribute local semi-dedicated processors with the distributed memory systems, and now we're talking about leaps ahead for automotons, and robotics. Who needs a stupid file oriented operating system, when the information needed for a process is stored locally.

Unix is so yesterday, as well as any other file orientated storage system.

How do you organize your brain? Do you have file cabinets, with tabs, disks? pictures? No, it's some sort of random access sensory system that relates to previously accessed information. Something like the memristors they are talking about.

It's coming down to defining the complete application, before building the actual machine itself.

I imagine early prototypes may be in a metal box with wires, but interface is going to be a new problem. Most likely all fibre connections before connecting directly to sensors and embedding sensory processing at the sensor itself -- -- and so on.

about a month and a half ago
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HP Unveils 'The Machine,' a New Computer Architecture

fleebait Re:Inspiring (257 comments)

It might be just a little more than just a game changer.

Stop thinking about computers as boxes with wires, screens and disks, and start thinking about building the nervous system of a human being. Our bodies use distributed computing all over the place, with the vagus nervous system for the organs, with their own chemical memories, and feedback loops, the localized muscle memory systems for arms, legs, fingers, locally stored programs that run semi-autonomously.

If you read about memristors on Wikipedia, you can begin to see the possibilities of interfacing with biologic systems, and the newer bioligic chemical sensors within the organs, and appendages. Distribute local semi-dedicated processors with the distributed memory systems, and now we're talking about leaps ahead for automotons, and robotics. Who needs a stupid file oriented operating system, when the information needed for a process is stored locally.

Unix is so yesterday, as well as any other file orientated storage system.

How do you organize your brain? Do you have file cabinets, with tabs, disks? pictures? No, it's some sort of random access sensory system that relates to previously accessed information. Something like the memristors they are talking about.

It's coming down to defining the complete application, before building the actual machine itself.

I imagine early prototypes may be in a metal box with wires, but interface is going to be a new problem. Most likely all fibre connections before connecting directly to sensors and embedding sensory processing at the sensor itself -- -- and so on.

about a month and a half ago
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In First American TV Interview, Snowden Talks Accountability and Patriotism

fleebait Re:Repatriation, yeah right. (389 comments)

I have a fair amount of confidence that if he were freed, we'd read an article about his sad, untimely death within a couple of years. You know, those strange suicides where they shot themselves 3 times in the head. Maybe a tragic car crash. The powers that be have good resources and plenty of plausible deniability.

I don't think it would take any "powers that be" to do the job.

about 2 months ago
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Australia Declares Homeopathy Nonsense, Urges Doctors to Inform Patients

fleebait Re:just keep in mind (408 comments)

So not all homeopathy is bullshit or contains mostly water or uses snake poison or any of that nonsense..

Throw enough crap against the wall, and some of it will stick.

about 4 months ago
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AI researcher says amoral robots pose a danger to humanity

fleebait amoral things (1 comments)

Cars do amoral things all the time, the more powerful the more damage. Watch out for the monster truck.

about 5 months ago
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Does Relying On an IDE Make You a Bad Programmer?

fleebait Hammer screw with IDE (627 comments)

Hammering a screw with an IDE means job security in government work.

about 5 months ago
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US Light Bulb Phase-Out's Next Step Begins Next Month

fleebait Re:Regulations a bit premature (1146 comments)

. Or you could buy an LED bulb for $15 (or whatever) and get a nickel back each month.

It's gonna cost a helluva lot to ship all those nickels.

about 7 months ago
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Why Is Science Behind a Paywall?

fleebait Re:Because it's valuable, duh. (210 comments)

Guess who else gets a cut of that pie.

The research institution does not give this stuff to publishers for free, they get their percentage too. So in addition to the publishers disappearing from existence, the researchers, or institutions lose their cut, too.

I guess we should be able to get this stuff for free, and the individuals, or institutions should give up their additional source of income.

about a year ago
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Bruce Schneier: Why Collecting More Data Doesn't Increase Safety

fleebait Re:Collecting Data vs. Analysis (149 comments)

It is always possible to collect data, and simply save it. Nobody has to search, nobody has to listen.
Until, maybe a year or two later, when a PERIOD of Interest is identified, which reduces what is to be searched immensely.

about a year ago
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Elon Musk Hates 405 Freeway Traffic, Pays Money To Speed Construction

fleebait Re:$50k enough? (431 comments)

I believe the average cost per mile for a highway is anywhere between $2M - $6M.

So yeah, $50k is nothing.

That quote would be good for a two lane in the early eighties, outside the city.

about a year ago
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Texas Company's Antique Computers Are For Production, Not Display

fleebait Re:Debugging that... (289 comments)

"THAT", (a wired board), is vastly easier to debug than any modern software. In fact a trainee can usually debug it by trial an error in just a few minutes.
Now get off my digital lawn whipersnapper!

Except when you get 2 bad plugs, or jacks, or a backside solder joint cracks.

Can take an hour or two to fix it.

I seem to remember it taking about 45 minutes for someone else to go over the programming sheet, and check the plugs (including coffee).

about a year ago
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Smartphone Used To Scan Data From Chip-Enabled Credit Cards

fleebait Re:Need a better source than some hack reporter (236 comments)

At the very least it's very much open to a Man in the Middle attack.

Not quite, The transaction terminal sends the time of day to the card. The card uses it's internal key, encrypts the TOD, and sends it back to the transaction terminal as verification.

Using "man in the middle" it is not possible to encrypt a new TOD that will be acceptable.

Simple, but as secure as the encryption algorithm, and key size

about a year ago
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Apple To Launch Largest Stock Repurchasing Plan In History

fleebait Re:Dumbest idea, ever (282 comments)

Financing the buyback with debt is a tiny bit worrisome, but Apple's probably just taking advantage of the low interest rates their high credit rating and hoard of cash afford them.

Short term financing vs. long term financing. Borrowing money today, when they can probably get it somewhere less than 2% interest, vs a future interest of 7% (or more) within the next 5 years, is not a bad bet. It's called "putting the cash to work". Cash just sitting in the bank doesn't make anything.

Taking this position, if they maxed out their value, they could shut down sales for a year, do research, and still survive. With Apple's strength it is a wise move.

This is all about good financial management. and nothing about products.

about a year ago
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Hijacking Airplanes With an Android Phone

fleebait Remote control 101 Re:I call BS (131 comments)

I am going to call BS on this one.
These are indication systems.
Think of smashing your speedometer and turning the needle with pliers and expecting the car to go faster.

Remote control is not a direct connect. It follows communications paths, and the information and control path apparently connects through the internet, both through the display and control path.

No one needs direct connection within the airplane -- all ya need to do is control it through the internet, at any receiver path, and any transmitting path. with additional directional antenna paths.

Can't do it from onboard, has to be from a remote site, and will involve additional receiver and transmit packages, not included on the android phone. (don't even have to be near the android used for control).

about a year ago
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How the Super Bowl Will Reach US Submarines

fleebait Re:Ever Wonder? (142 comments)

Ever wonder how troops serving abroad in remote locations and even underwater might get to watch the Super Bowl?

No, I'm more concerned at the already over-inflated military budget being spent on watching a fucking football game.

Ever wonder how much it costs to get a contractor to the services to do a network wide test of high data rate services?

Watch a ball game, and get a system wide test for free.

about a year and a half ago
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Hidden Viral Gene Discovered In GMO Crops

fleebait Re:The greedy are not trustworthy (391 comments)

If GMO is so safe, why do the food-industry fight so hard to avoid labelling the products?

Because they don't want to include a 2 pound book required by labeling requirements and explanations with every one pound of canned beans.

about a year and a half ago
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Hidden Viral Gene Discovered In GMO Crops

fleebait Someone doesn't like cauliflower (391 comments)

Will a cauliflower virus attack my smelly feet, or what?

Just maybe it might make cauliflower edible

mosaic cauliflower -- that new purple stuff is the result. Next thing you know they'll make white lumpy beets or something.

about a year and a half ago
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Ramanujan's Deathbed Conjecture Finally Proven

fleebait Re:Flunked out of college twice (186 comments)

I wonder what would happen if US colleges (or even earlier in our educational system) let students have free reign, and really specialize.

Then maybe the US would continue to rein over the rest of the planet indefinitely.

Or until a year later, their narrow minded specialization became obsolete, with the new graduating class.

I studied communications:
vacuum tubes, teletype, rotary switches -- all the modern stuff of the time. Even had 2 weeks of transistor theory, a promising new technology, suitable mostly for portable radios at the time.

Because of those unwanted "required" electives I took philosophy and logic (totally of no use in electronics), although some of it applied to math in a nonsensical way.

And then the world changed. And fourier analysis came along, and then a to d developed, and then multiplex signals happenned for missile instrumentation and then digitization happened, and then it became possible to do discrete analysis of complex waveforms in real time.

Too narrow minded in college leaves you ultimately with the workers laid off in the steel mills, with no transferable skills.

about a year and a half ago

Submissions

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Employees who stay more than 2 years paid 50% less

fleebait fleebait writes  |  about a month ago

fleebait (1432569) writes "According to Forbes:

The worst kept secret is that employees are making less on average every year. There are millions of reasons for this, but we’re going to focus on one that we can control. Staying employed at the same company for over two years on average is going to make you earn less over your lifetime by about 50% or more."

Link to Original Source

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