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Kickstarter's Problem: You Have To Make the Game Before You Ask For Money

fluffy99 Re:Yeah, so? (210 comments)

It's a bit of a mix of both, but primarily a video game with trading card like features. (It sounded pretty lame to me)
http://www.redbull.com/en/game....

3 days ago
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Researcher Fired At NSF After Government Questions Her Role As 1980s Activist

fluffy99 Re:Wrong Title (496 comments)

I guess you didn't bother reading the first two paragraphs of the form.

The same questionnaire form is used for performing a background check to determine suitability for sensitive, non-classified positions as well. It also clearly spells out that failing to completely and truthfully complete the questionnaire is ground for denying you employment.

5 days ago
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UK's National Health Service Moves To NoSQL Running On an Open-Source Stack

fluffy99 Re:How quickly will they run back to Oracle? (198 comments)

Really, Wikipedia, Google, and the NoSQL site itself disagree with you. It was originally called "Not Only SQL" and later many started calling it "No SQL".

The intent of the initial title was to indicate that it was an alternative to SQL, but later in life SQL-like query functionality was grafted into many implementations. It's likely the NHS implementation has sql querying capability if they did a rip-n-replace of the underlying database, otherwise the project becomes immensely larger as you have to re-write or modify everything that touches the database.

5 days ago
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UK's National Health Service Moves To NoSQL Running On an Open-Source Stack

fluffy99 Re:How quickly will they run back to Oracle? (198 comments)

NoSQL stands for Not Only SQL. Running NoSQL doesn't preclude SQL. In fact if they did a rip-n-replace they are more than likely using an implementation that still supports SQL queries.

about a week ago
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Islamic State "Laptop of Doom" Hints At Plots Including Bubonic Plague

fluffy99 Re:Looking for a real conversation (369 comments)

Go read the bible which has passages advocating similar violence. You don't see the Christians following those either, at least not since the crusades.

about two weeks ago
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Anti-Ebola Drug ZMapp Makes Clean Sweep: 18 of 18 Monkeys Survive Infection

fluffy99 Re:Main Problem (91 comments)

Of course considering the mess Liberia has been in for 20+ years this outbreak is relatively minor and only receiving attention due to sensationalism.

No, it's receiving a lot of attention because the outbreak is not contained to a small remote village as with previous outbreaks. It's not contained at this point (partly due to the lack of govt in these areas), and there is a significant population in danger. The fairly long incubation period of up to a few weeks means this could easily be carried back to major populated areas and spread like wildfire.

about two weeks ago
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Anti-Ebola Drug ZMapp Makes Clean Sweep: 18 of 18 Monkeys Survive Infection

fluffy99 Re:Human Subjects (91 comments)

I think they should be volunteers at the very least.

Given the 90% mortality rate of ebola, I suspect nearly anyone infected will want to volunteer. The problem is that the drug can't be mass produced yet. 10s of doses takes months to produce using the current method, which is genetically modified tobacco plants (bit of irony there). A massive influx of resource is needed to ramp up production.

about two weeks ago
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Injecting Liquid Metal Into Blood Vessels Could Help Kill Tumors

fluffy99 Re:We already have something functionally similar (111 comments)

+1 for informative if I had it. Indium and Gallium are somewhat toxic, and ironically suspected as carcinogenic.
http://amdg.ece.gatech.edu/msd...

I wonder if the intent was for the metal to get absorbed and held in the tumor rather and slowly poison it more than restrict the blood flow.

about a month ago
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Laser Eye Surgery, Revisited 10 Years Later

fluffy99 Re:Astronomy, and general poor night-time results. (550 comments)

Also the fact that it won't prevent future changes to vision. I'm thirty now, and my vision still continues to slowly get worse. I fear I'd be paying for a 5 year reprieve from glasses and then be back to wearing them with side effects I also have to live with for the rest of my life.

I had PRK since I had too much correct to do normal lasik. Its essentially lasik but they don't cut a flap first, has a longer recovery time, but is actually more accurate than lasik. I went from a -10.5 diopter prescription with contacts (pretty thick if I wore glasses) to 15/20 vision without. The only noticeable side effect was a very slight halo effect around bright objects at night. This is caused by the edges of the laser correction area becoming visible when the iris is fully dilated. For heavier corrections the max diameter of the correction area depends on the prescription and how much material they can take off in the center of the correction area, and for lasik how big they can cut the flap.

I made it about 10 years without glasses after that and now use very light prescription glasses mostly for driving and reading. I still don't need glasses for most things, and its awesome to see the alarm clock in the middle of the night without having to fumble for glasses first. I also don't worry about losing a contact and having to drive home with very impaired vision. I don't regret the decision at all even though I'm back to wearing glasses.

about 2 months ago
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Man Booted From Southwest Flight and Threatened With Arrest After Critical Tweet

fluffy99 Re:Why did he roll like a pussy? (928 comments)

What the fuck does the 1st amendement have to do with this? The airline is a business and they have every right to decline to do business with you and refuse to fly you anywhere. The airline is obligated by FAA rules to disallow disruptive passengers on their planes, so yelling at the agent or refusing to comply with their reasonable instructions means they are legally require to remove you from the plane. If you yell at the McDonalds counter jockey, don't be surprised when they refuse to sell you a burger and ask you to leave.

about 2 months ago
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Man Booted From Southwest Flight and Threatened With Arrest After Critical Tweet

fluffy99 Re:Customer service? (928 comments)

You might find the Mythbusters testing information. They found Front-to-Back to be the worst as well. The best seemed to be back corner windows moving forward and in to the aisle as I recall.

about 2 months ago
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Man Booted From Southwest Flight and Threatened With Arrest After Critical Tweet

fluffy99 Re:Customer service? (928 comments)

I would fire the agent for starters, and whoever was involved.

The gate agent was correct in telling him he could move back in the line to join his kids, but they couldn't cut in line and move up to join him. That's the policy and they tell you this when asking you to line up. The guy was in the wrong and then whined on twitter about how they didn't bend over to kiss his ass. His tweet naming the person could be construed as harassment or slander.

Pulling him off the plane was a poor reaction, even if the intent was just to just to ask him to delete the tweet or at least revise it to delete the persons name. I suspect the agent threatened to call security and have him removed because he continued to be an ass, but that would be a one-sided opinion just like the guy claiming they were rude and threatened him.

about 2 months ago
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Can Thunderbolt Survive USB SuperSpeed+?

fluffy99 Re:So in other words, it will be just like Firewir (355 comments)

This is exactly what I came here to post. It's a shame, because FW400 was far superior to USB2.0. The problem lay with the peripheral manufacturers who didn't want to put in more expensive controllers and dual-ports on their enclosures. Heck, wasn't the iSight the only webcam for Firewire? No demand=no supply=high prices. FW800 was pretty much the same. Better tech, limited market, high prices, bang, whimper. I love that my old Mac Mini can transfer data between 3 daisy-chained FW400 drives much faster than it can transfer to a single USB2.0 drive, but the fact that enclosures are expensive and basically non-interchangeable with any of my other devices makes it a pretty niche market.
Thunderbolt will probably follow the exact same progression, right down to the "new" faster Thunderbolt. Sure, its PCI-E, but 95% of consumers don't know, care, or need that capability. They buy on price and availability, plain and simple.

One of the security failures of firewire was that it provided direct access to memory. In other words a malicious external device could gain complete control of the computer. Having your peripheral interface be PCIe is just as bad. USB for all its overhead is still more secure (assuming you finally fix some of the stupid windows autoexecute bugs)

about 4 months ago
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OpenSSL: the New Face of Technology Monoculture

fluffy99 Re:Apples and oranges (113 comments)

With open-source software, a monoculture isn't that bad a thing, as the Heartbleed exploit has shown. ... How fast was a fix available for Heartbleed?

Heartbleed showed that a monoculture, particularly one relying on poorly written and barely reviewed code is a bad thing. OSS or not. That the source code was fixed so easily just highlights to me how the heartbeat feature it was never properly reviewed or tested, and how people using openssl or incorporating it into their products never questioned it. The many eyes argument fails when you realize how few qualified programmers looked at the code. Given how wide spread openssl is, getting that fix rolled out to all the s/w and h/w that have it embedded is a nightmare. Just think of the Billions being spent to audit and test across enterprise networks, and update all that software.

Sure openssl will get more scrutiny for a while, but it doesn't fix the underlying fallacy that OSS automatically means quality code regardless of whether its commercial, free, or otherwise licensed. Or that OSS projects quite often have a shoestring budget, lower quality programmers, and less far less review than closed, proprietary software.

about 5 months ago
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How Does Heartbleed Alter the 'Open Source Is Safer' Discussion?

fluffy99 Re:Wat? (582 comments)

You seriously think that black hats bother with reading millions of lines of code in the hope of finding an exploit when all they have to do is play with the data sent to services/applications and see if it misbehaves. Which is why exploits are equally found among closed and open softwares.

This is true, and exactly how this was found by Codenomicon. Having access to the source code actually makes it far easier to turn the bad behavior into a working exploit, particularly for something like buffer overflows. Although in this case, there wasn't much work needed as the bad behavior was returning the contents of memory in response to a bad parameter.

about 5 months ago
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How Does Heartbleed Alter the 'Open Source Is Safer' Discussion?

fluffy99 Re:Open source was never safer (582 comments)

I think this says more about the prevailing view of security. Every programmer is told "NEVER roll your own encryption". The default result is that most programmers never even look at the code and instead assume it MUST be safe since the infallible "experts" wrote it. What we are seeing here is not the fault of open source vs closed source; it is about voodoo programming being considered good security practice.

I'm not saying that everyone should be rolling their own encryption, but people should be looking over the experts implementations instead of assuming they are perfect (this bug could have been caught by any number of "normal" programmers had they simply taken the time to looked).

The irony is that the openssl authors chose to roll their own malloc implementation instead of using the default, trusted one which would have likely crashed instead of facilitating the leakage of memory. (I still blame the fundamentally flawed nature of C for even allowing this)

about 5 months ago
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More Than 1 In 4 Car Crashes Involve Cellphone Use

fluffy99 Some real statistics. (367 comments)

http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/P...

An NHSTA sponsored study says at any given moment during the day, 5% of Americans are driving while using a cell phone.. The study has some caveats - it relied on phone surveys, visual road-side observations, and only goes up to 2011, so may be significantly under-reporting cell phone usage. I estimate that number is closer to 10% based on casual observation while driving. So in a two -car accident that gives a 10% chance of a cell phone used in one of the cars. If the real cell-phone usage number is closer to 15%, then the 26% number is meaningless as it's typical of the overall population regardless of cell phone use.

When I see a stupid driving move, the person is invariably holding a cell phone to their face, talking and gesticulating wildly while they're the only person in the vehicle (hands-free), looking down at something (texting or dialing), or it's a woman putting on makeup while driving.

about 6 months ago
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Linux May Succeed Windows XP As OS of Choice For ATMs

fluffy99 Re:heartburn in the industry? (367 comments)

Fortunately, our equipment is not internet-connected (though it is networked), so security isn't really a principle concern.

Didn't the power industry say the same thing? Never, ever, assume the network is safe and not internet accessible if you don't own the network.

about 6 months ago
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Bitcoin Exchange Flexcoin Wiped Out By Theft

fluffy99 Re:When are the bank runs going to happen? (704 comments)

And then, how many people are keeping the bitcoins themselves without adequate off-site backup?

In the general population maybe 5% of people have off site backups. Do they suddenly become wiser when they have bitcoins? Maybe a bit. But I'll bet it's still far less than half that have a proper backup system.

How exactly do you "backup" a bitcoin to protect it from theft? Backing up the coin info does zero good if someone already managed to effect a transfer of that coin. It's no more helpful than having a copy of your last bank statement after someone cleaned out your account (expect perhaps for FIDC insurance might payout on the loss).

Certainly, you're an idiot if you only keep the information in one place and risk losing it due to a simple HD crash. Safety of the coins from accidental loss was the allure of these exchanges. No-one really considered the theft aspect hard enough.

So has anyone tracked those coins to see where they went? The good (or bad) aspect of bitconis is their traceability. Did they eventually end up buying goods or getting cashed out somewhere?

about 6 months ago
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Bitcoin Exchange Flexcoin Wiped Out By Theft

fluffy99 Re: When are the bank runs going to happen? (704 comments)

PCI compliance.

Citing PCI compliance don't do much. After all, look at how badly the credit card companies are doing with intrusions and compromises.

about 6 months ago

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