×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Google Tackles Health

foobsr How depressing ... (115 comments)

TFS: "Apple CEO Tim Cook said, "For too many of our friends and family, life has been cut short or the quality of their life is too often lacking. ..."

Yes, I bet the friends and especially the families of CEOs (Cook's base salary $1.4 million, cash bonus $2.8 million in 2012) suffer a lot, more than those of the remaining citizens. Not to forget the grief that especially Cook has with all the criticism that Apple does almost pay no taxes.

More on topic: I can well imagine how life prolongement via Google would look like sensors and actors controlled by Google (get your life stream optimized on our servers).

CC.

about 7 months ago
top

"Patent Troll" Closes Controversial Podcast Patent Deal With SanDisk

foobsr Accuracy (65 comments)

TFS: 'between a third and two thirds of all mp3 audio players'

Kills the motivation to read on immediately.

CC.

about 7 months ago
top

Korean 'Armadillo' Electric Car Folds Up, Parks, Controlled By Your Smartphone

foobsr SF concept from 1974 !!! (124 comments)

From 'The Mote in God's Eye' (Larry Niven & Jerry Pournelle)

Quote from WikiPedia "... On the ground, Engineers drive at breakneck speed on crowded roads without fear of collision, and upon reaching destination, will dismantle their cars so they won’t take too much parking space.".

Also, one can find hints regarding driving habits: "Korean drivers don’t rely on (or follow) rules, just what they can see (i.e. anyone may do anything at any time, so a driver must be vigilant)." ( http://koreanalyst.wordpress.com/2009/06/24/driving-in-korea-vs-america/ ).

Well

CC.

about 8 months ago
top

Tennessee Official: Water Complaints Could be "Act of Terrorism"

foobsr Re:Scare tactics (407 comments)

No, they have to have a base to recruit from.

CC.

about 9 months ago
top

Obama Announces Open Data Policy With Executive Order

foobsr Re:I thought that's what data.gov was? (94 comments)

I'm also a little bit sceptical of relying on a random private company, GitHub, to be the canonical data host.

Dependency and control.

CC.

about a year ago
top

Sleep Deprivation Lowers School Achievement In Children

foobsr Re:Let me be the first to say... (272 comments)

TFS probably was done by a sleep deprived individuum.
The point is the alarmingly high percentage of children affected in some countries, especially the US, combined with reasons and large scale effects.
CC.

about a year ago
top

The New AI: Where Neuroscience and Artificial Intelligence Meet

foobsr Re:fly brains (209 comments)

Thank you, your comments render a much better understanding on my side
However, let me add a few thoughts.
perceptions ... no continuous real-world sensors
To me, that sounds a lot like conceptual learning isolated from perception. YMMV
Though, I do not know whether "intelligent" behaviour may emerge without the challenges that a body full of sensors as well as (parallel) means to cope with these that is interfaced to a brain that (my view) on a high level (call it consciously, think focus of attention) is concentrating on controlling one task, namely generating "intention" or "goals".
Forgetting could be an actively decided optimization parameter, as opposed to a byproduct of capacity.
Which may occur in the "real world" as well, though presumably focussed in the realm of "emotions" (BTW, this raises the question how emotions interact with more or less cognitive processes).
not a constantly active information stream
Crucial, and I am fine with the whole paragraph, especially as you somehow emphasize the "tool" aspect, which gives you a lot more degrees of freedom compared to efforts to engineer some "reality".
Also, being self-destructive indicates "not intelligent"?
This is taken out of context, namely "immediate trust". My remark was triggered by an (admittedly dim) recall of a classification that Stegmüller made (K1, K2, K3 systems) with regard to teleological systems. IIRC, one can extend the scheme to a continuum from acting immediately in response to an input to tailoring the action to the outcome of building a "complete" model/simulation of the context (warning: recursion ahead).
I agree that suicide might be an "intelligent choice". Ethics and moral add yet another layer.
Besides, an artificial intelligence ...
You are probably better of if you call your envisioned system along the lines of "cognitive augmentation". This lowers expectations while still complex enough, shifts the focus from "basic" to "applied" (funding? I speculate "applied" has more appeal) and makes the goal scalable (creating backdoors when confronted with too many nontrivial problems) by redefinition of the target group.
Intelligence requires weariness? Intelligence negates meticulousness?The pursuit of goals is not intelligent?
For an autonomous system, which a tool is not, yes to both: sleep, fuzzyness.
It was not "pursuit of goals" but "follow instructions". Anyhow, with the "toolfocus", this is irrelevant.
Given proper sharing of context, instructions in natural language can be unambiguous
For practical purposes, yes. IMHO, theoretically, no (Gödel).

Disclaimer: I am only expressing my opinions here, which are based on what is left from working in the field in the 80ies and loosely following (more or less meager) development since then.

CC.

about a year ago
top

The New AI: Where Neuroscience and Artificial Intelligence Meet

foobsr Re:fly brains (209 comments)

So, more detail.
perfect recall

Conflicts with prioritizing if you have provisions for priority zero (forgetting, irrelevant if the link goes away or the information is erased).
could converse about its knowledge and thought processes
Telling more than we can know (Nisbett &Wilson, 1977, Psychological Review, 84, 231–259), protocol analysis, expert interviews: evidence that this is at least not always possible. My hypothesis is that too much metaprocessing would lead to a deadlock.
conversational feedback would have immediate application without lengthy retraining
Would imply that the system immediately trusts. Would probably be rather self destructive, thus not intelligent.
tirelessly and meticulously follow instructions given in natural language
The antithesis of intelligent behaviour?
So now I say that I see a recursive combinatorial explosion happening during conflict resolution.
CC.

about a year ago
top

The New AI: Where Neuroscience and Artificial Intelligence Meet

foobsr Re:What's actually new here? (209 comments)

One of the few good things about getting older is that you can remember hearing the same hype before.

At least, sometimes, the hype spirals in a promising direction :)

CC.

about a year ago
top

The New AI: Where Neuroscience and Artificial Intelligence Meet

foobsr Re:Good points (209 comments)

Mammalian brains tire, need sleep, do not have perfect recall, run things out of time order and convinces itself otherwise, take a long time to train, and has strong emotional needs.
Who has ruled out that these are preconditions?

CC.

about a year ago
top

The New AI: Where Neuroscience and Artificial Intelligence Meet

foobsr Re:fly brains (209 comments)

I'd love to have a system with perfect recall, could converse about its knowledge and thought processes such that conversational feedback would have immediate application without lengthy retraining, and could tirelessly and meticulously follow instructions given in natural language.

I see a combinatorial explosion at the horizon.

CC.

about a year ago
top

New Flying Car Design Unveiled

foobsr Re:People can't navigate in 2D (233 comments)

Millions of autonomous flying cars? That's such a pie-eyed fantasy as to be laughable.

How did the passenger pigeon manage navigation and collision avoidance?

Quote from Wikipedia: "One flock in 1866 in southern Ontario was described as being 1 mi (1.5 km) wide and 300 mi (500 km) long, took 14 hours to pass, and held in excess of 3.5 billion birds.".

CC.

about a year ago
top

New Flying Car Design Unveiled

foobsr Re:Yeah. Now (233 comments)

This one would even be vintage.

Image detail for -popular mechanics magazine cover july 1957
http://media-cache-ak1.pinimg.com/550x/b9/c3/5d/b9c35dd72fc746aedfd262d9f4fbc1d1.jpg

CC.

about a year ago

Submissions

top

(drum fill) The Google Phone

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 4 years ago

foobsr (693224) writes "Wired informs us that, finally, the Googlephone will be on sale in the beginning of 2010. And it is already in use: "Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.1; en-us; Nexus One Build/ERD56C) AppleWebKit/530.17 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/530.17". The device is unlocked."
Link to Original Source
top

Finalists for UK Engineering Prize Selected

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 5 years ago

foobsr writes "Today the the four finalists for the 2008 Royal Academy of Engineering MacRobert Award have been made known to the Public. Candidates cover a broad range: a catalytic coverter to clean diesel emissions, a cool robotic retrieval system working at -80C, a sensor on a chip that can detect explosives, and the i-Limb (already featured here), a bionic hand that you might be in need of if the sensor failed you. The BBC has a concise summary."
Link to Original Source
top

Vivendi and Activision join Forces

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 6 years ago

foobsr writes "As a $18.9 billion company, Activision Blizzard will become the biggest games publisher, defeating EA. Since Vivendi is covering music, television, video games, and cell phones whereas Activision seems to emphasize on social networking, one might expect an era of gaming environments with the potential to replace reality."
Link to Original Source
top

Google goes green

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 6 years ago

foobsr writes "Google today announced it would invest hundreds of millions of dollars to make "Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal" in the near future. Larry Page stated: "With talented technologists, great partners and significant investments, we hope to rapidly push forward. Our goal is to produce one gigawatt of renewable energy capacity that is cheaper than coal. We are optimistic this can be done in years, not decades." This probably adds some new semantics to GoogleEarth."
Link to Original Source
top

Nanotechnology Makes 'Plastic Steel' a Reality

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 6 years ago

foobsr writes "Drawing on the molecular structure of seashells, scientists at the University of Michigan have created a transparent nanocomposite lighter than steel, but of the same strength. The material is built one nanoscale layer after another by a machine developed by the researchers. ScienceDaily and nanowerk have details."

Journals

top

Imagine: A Deamon Controlled Car ...

foobsr foobsr writes  |  about a year and a half ago ... like in ifconfig wlan0 down which might be a brake ...

CC.

top

The End of the Desktop

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 2 years ago

More or less accidentially, I dist-upgraded LMDE to find GNOME3 which I until now avoided (like Unity, for that matter).

Oh, I wish I had switched on my brain before upgrading.

CC.

top

Technical Evangelist

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 2 years ago

This made my day today at around 10:30 a.m. !

Read this for the first time, and it seems to be an MS job title.

Astounding!

CC.

top

Disapprove the US!

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 3 years ago Lately. I more and more get the feeling that it is time that the world gets a grip and disapproves what commonly is known as 'US Leadership'.

We do not need you !

CC.

top

Astonishing ...

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 3 years ago By accident, I stumbled across this one: "This section needs references that appear in reliable third-party publications. Primary sources or sources affiliated with the subject are generally not sufficient for a Wikipedia article. Please add more appropriate citations from reliable sources."

Yes, historians should now refrain from digging for primary sources.

Speechless.

CC.

top

Moderation ...

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 4 years ago

... would be improved if one (all) would know who assessed what how.

top

Pronunciation of SuSE

foobsr foobsr writes  |  more than 9 years ago Zoo-sa.

IPA (International Spelling Alphabet): zu:z[e rotated mathematically positively by 180 deg.]

Me is a native German speaker.

No need to remember this anyway, the distro will disappear.

CC.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...