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The New-ish Technologies That Will Alter Your Career

frank_adrian314159 Re:Shilling for dice. (66 comments)

Over on Dice, contributor Bennet Haselton writes....

On news tonight - an informational black hole formed at Dice headquarters in New York today. John Smallberries, NIST Underdirector for Strategic Initiatives said, "It appears that a company, Dice Holdings, tried to post their normal daily Bennet Haselton article. When they did that, they neglected to measure the amount of negative information that this article contained and failed to isolate it properly. The amount of negative information was so great that it started absorbing any intelligence that was close to it and the process now seems to have formed a closed loop. We know that, if not stopped, the resulting absorption of intelligence from the rapidly expanding stupid horizon around what we are now calling a "Haselton-type neginfo black hole" could potentially destroy civilization. We continue to search for an answer. The only positive news that we have to offer is that the black hole seems to be growing relatively slowly, as the investment banking community in New York has already driven away most of the intelligence that could feed the hole. We've attempted to send volunteer scientists across the threshold in an attempt to find a way to shut this phenomenon down. None of them have returned. We extend our sincerest condolences to theses brave scientist's families and continue to look for a solution to this dire emergency. I have no further comment at this time."

about a week ago
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Group Tries To Open Source Seeds

frank_adrian314159 Re:Story I heard as a kid (100 comments)

A rising tide may not lift all boats. Let's say that rather than giving your hybrid to all neighbors, you give it to the world. Now everyone in the world raises yields by 50 bpa. And now, you've glutted the market and the price per bushel is so low no one makes a profit, so the farmers go bust. Or the farmers agree to destroy commodities to keep the price up. That happened with dairy products during the great depression. Dairy farmers produced too much, prices collapsed, farmers could no longer buy feed for their cattle, and went out of business, destroying their herds in the process. This brought about farm price support programs.

The moral of the story? If you want a rising tide for boats when supply increases, demand has to rise, as well. As you have failed to address the demand side and assume an infinitely elastic market, you lose, economically-speaking.

Next time, we'll introduce you to the concept of inequitable distribution of market gains, so you can understand that rising tides do not lift all boats equitably, so even if a rising tide does raise all the boats, a majority of the fleet's captain's can still all feel poorer as a result of the process. Remember that, at the core, we're still dealing with human psychological processes here. Even if you raise the boats, relative level matters - especially if you want to look at rational models of effort vs. probability of reward.

about a week ago
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Sweden Considers Adding "Sexism" Ratings To Video Games

frank_adrian314159 Re:What about the male stereotypes? (641 comments)

Which, if any, particular Disney princesses do you rate as "mindless bimbos"?

All of them? Because they're essentially sold characters who do not protest being sold? I thought selling people was wrong. But not these people. As such, they help to send a message that it is fine for some humanoids (or parts of their aspects) to be commoditized. Bad message on many levels... even worse for kids, who do not need to learn to use other people as commoditized tools for their own pleasure.

OK, that's harsh. But maybe one could uplevel this discussion a bit to point out that in a society where just about anything is commoditized, it might be a good idea to question that assumption, first.

about two weeks ago
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Sweden Considers Adding "Sexism" Ratings To Video Games

frank_adrian314159 Re:Slashdot freaks out over $36,672 (641 comments)

We pay attention because Sweden is frequently held up as a model for the US by American progressives.

Yeah. Because American progressives have so much power these days... Snort. Try again...

about two weeks ago
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Sweden Considers Adding "Sexism" Ratings To Video Games

frank_adrian314159 MOD PARENT FUNNY! (641 comments)

Or informative... or pathetic... I'm not quite sure which - I don't play that many Swedish games (which, according to the PP, might be a good thing).

about two weeks ago
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Sweden Considers Adding "Sexism" Ratings To Video Games

frank_adrian314159 Re:Harassment Patrol (641 comments)

Fortunately, those in Gamergate care about stopping shitty behavior on both sides.

Tee hee. Right. Snort... Because we do that with more invective, more scorched-earth activity like doxxing and death threats against people who had the temerity to voice an opinion that someone didn't like. Maybe people never taught you folks this: YOU SHOULDN'T MAKE DEATH THREATS, ONLINE OR ELSEWHERE! The fact that it is done doesn't make it right. At least that's how I'd explain it to a five year-old, which seems to be the moral level of many in your "community".

about two weeks ago
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World's Youngest Microsoft Certificated Professional Is Five Years Old

frank_adrian314159 Re:Note to IT recruiters. (276 comments)

This week on AskHR!

When will the 5 year old be replaced by a 1H-B because it's cheaper?

This is a simple question for any HR professional! It's very obvious when you think about it. You're assuming that all engineers are equivalent - they're not! Each of them have different cost functions and must be handled as an individual on that basis! As such, the H1-B will replace the five year-old when the H1-B cheaper than a five year-old. And the easiest way for that to happen is if the H1-B in question is a five year-old! As, I said, simple... At least for an HR Professional like me!

Remember to send your questions to AskHR! Everyone who asks a question gets entered into a drawing for a free pink slip! Not that you weren't already in that lottery, but... May the odds be ever in your favor.

about two weeks ago
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Facebook Planning Office Version To Rival LinkedIn, Google

frank_adrian314159 Re:All tech companies move on each other (91 comments)

However I doubt that I would like my colleagues and Linkedin business contacts to know about my: racing hamster, gunpowder musket and jedi religion hobbies.

But that means you aren't being authentic! And how can you be passionate about your work if you're not authentically passionate? Once Facebook enters the workplace, it's only a matter of time until your social and work life will be entwined even more! And you'll be able to tell all of your "real world" friends about how awesomes your workspace is! And HOW MUCH YOU LOVE YOUR JOB! And to make sure, the company will put out guidelines as to how many posts you output per week (on your "own" time, if there's any left) you need to post to show your dedication to social interaction within the company! Show your authentic selfie! ON! FACEBOOK AT WORK!!!

OK. Sarcasm mode off. How did we get to a point where companies are actually talking about stuff like passion as a requirement for work? I have passion for women and my music and the skilled craft I pursue. But for a job? Well, let's just say it's fine to put in a day and a half's work for a day's pay, huh? Why ask us to fake passion for you, too? But I guess that's what whores always get asked for. And in the end, all of us who trade labor for money are that. Maybe we could look for a better economic system that didn't allow some to make unreasonable demands on others? But I guess that's just me...

about two weeks ago
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World's Youngest Microsoft Certificated Professional Is Five Years Old

frank_adrian314159 Re:Note to IT recruiters. (276 comments)

A MS cert does not trump a computing degree.

It depends on how much the five year-old costs compared to someone with a computing degree.

about two weeks ago
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A Worm's Mind In a Lego Body

frank_adrian314159 Re:Of course it scales (200 comments)

Everyone knows it's Lisp all the way down until you get the the atoms, then it's this weird probabilistic stuff.

about two weeks ago
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Billionaire Donors Lavish Millions On Code.org Crowdfunding Project

frank_adrian314159 Re:Ballmer should have picked up a clipboard (84 comments)

Well that's good, but what the hell does it have to do with this subject? People who throw Malcolm Gladwell articles are like monkeys and their Malcolm Gladwell articles.

about two weeks ago
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Japanese Maglev Train Hits 500kph

frank_adrian314159 Run faster, dammit! (418 comments)

Japan has now put 100 passengers on a Maglev train doing over 500kph.

Wow! They must be able to run pretty fast to catch it! Look out 2016 Olympics, here comes the Japanese train riders!

about two weeks ago
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Education Chief Should Know About PLATO and the History of Online CS Education

frank_adrian314159 Re:How many kids took those classes? (134 comments)

Most of those kids were at University High, a school that I actually know little about. And what I say here may be wildly apochryphal. God knows, there are probably folks who actuallly went there lurking here (and so, they should chime in). But I digress...

As my feeble recollection recalls (this was almost 40 years ago, you know) Uni High (as it was known by the natives) was a research vehicle for the Education Department at the University, where latest theories were sometimes field-tested. All I know is that a lot of the university's staff and teacher's kids went there and there were some percentage of townies, as well. Not a magnet school, per se, but certainly home to some extremely bright kids. They got to actually take classes via PLATO (something I would have killed for in high school) and sometimes they had PhD's teaching them (although mostly it was the teaching corps sporting MA's and going for the PhD that got put doing the scut work of actually teaching). Other than that, good high school in the state, certainly a bit better than the other schools in Chambana. That is all...

about two weeks ago
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Mathematics Great Alexander Grothendieck Dies At 86

frank_adrian314159 Re:Genius /Insanity (49 comments)

Just because people are crazy in one area of their life, it doesn't mean they can't turn out great work. That's why quite a few geniuses are people whom you probably couldn't stand to be with for very long. As for mathematicians? Newton? Erdos?

The math (or lack thereof) will speak for itself. If nothing else, it will be another glimpse inside a mind that came up with some of the most groundbreaking mathematical work of the last century.

about two weeks ago
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Education Chief Should Know About PLATO and the History of Online CS Education

frank_adrian314159 Back in the Day... (134 comments)

I took online courses on PLATO and wrote simple games for it. The hardware was laughable by today's standards - plasma screens that glowed orange text (and lines!) from a dark blue background with touch input provided on about a 1/2" grid coupled with hideously clunky keyboards having their own special function keys - but it was reasonably reliable and allowed some of the first really large scale research on CHI.

Not that anyone other than researchers actually gave a crap about that last part.

But the system was fun to write programs for. It had a pretty OK language for the day, called TUTOR, that contained necessary primitives to make it Turing complete along with others to let you write onto the screen in a variety of ways. Again, pretty primitive by today's standards, but enough to teach programming with - they were debugging the interpreter (I think Fortran) and I played with it once. Pretty advanced for the time with breakpoints being highlighted.

And of course this is back in the late 1970's. Before the PC was a gleam in IBM's eye. The whole thing ran as on a huge CDC 6600 running a custom OS (as many were, in those days). Odd instruction set by an even odder designer you may have heard of - guy named Seymour Cray. Quirkier than hell with 60-bit words, 18-bit address space, and 6-bit bytes (yes, we spoke octal). But that was back in the day when minicomputers were eating the lunch of the mainframe boys. CDC, whom the University of Illinois partnered with to productize the system, couldn't muster the resources or talent to market this system while swirling down the toilet.

And, like so many things in computing, we see progress, good ideas thwarted by, well, nothing but the fact that people are short-sighted and, if something doesn't make a buck for someone, we drop it on the floor. So it goes...

about two weeks ago
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Five Years of the Go Programming Language

frank_adrian314159 Re:Language bindings still broken on Mac OS (82 comments)

Several developers in the world work around bugs each day, so they can't be that bad.

If this is the normal viewpoint of Go developers/users, then I can see why few people actually use it.

about two weeks ago
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Crowd-Sourced Experiment To Map All Human Skills

frank_adrian314159 Good idea - bad ontology (70 comments)

The top level of their ontology names categories in Science & Technology, Sports, Social Sciences, Arts, Business, and "Technicals" and claims that "all skills" come under this tree. Well, I can name a node "everything", put everything under that and say that "all skills" come under that tree, too. It doesn't really make the classification useful.

So, what I see here are idiots who think that crowd sourcing ontologies work. Note - it doesn't. At least not very well.

about two weeks ago
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Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

frank_adrian314159 Re:Or just practicing for an actual job (320 comments)

So how do I get into embedded systems programming?

I programmed in assembly back when that was about all you had (IBM BAL, DecSystem-10, PDP-11, CDC 6600, etc. - OK, we had Fortran, too, and I did that, as well). That was when I was getting/after I got my Computer Engineering degree about thirty-five years ago. Then I got into applications development via EDA and since then, I've done applications in banking, finance, health care, system management, and security software.

So I'm pretty sure I can program embedded systems (I know what a device register is and I'm not afraid to use it). What advice do you have for breaking into the field?

about two weeks ago
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Pirate Bay Co-Founder Peter Sunde Is a Free Man Again

frank_adrian314159 Re:Its prison (356 comments)

But there are a lot of things that have, and out of those, some people choose to be depressed over the stupidest shit and it's not going to become socially acceptable.

If you can choose to "be depressed" then it's not actually depression, is it? What a moron you are.

about two weeks ago
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Home Depot Says Hackers Grabbed 53 Million Email Addresses

frank_adrian314159 Re:brick and mortar stores (99 comments)

I'll just hire some little people to dance around it once I'm done.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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FCC doesn't care about net neutrality anymore

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about 7 months ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The New York Times reports that, after a recent SCOTUS ruling ripped apart current net neutrality rules, the FCC has decided that net neutrality isn't worth arguing over — it's now perfectly fine for carriers (including your last mile providers) to charge different rates for different data. If Congress wants to change this, they can, but until then, the FCC has decided that this debate isn't worth debating any more."
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New CFAA "Reform" Draft Makes Law Even Worse

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "After the Aaron Swartz suicide, people had hoped that CFAA would be modified to be less draconian. Our naivete knows no bounds. Salon reports that the new draft of the modified CFAA makes the law even worse by expanding it (and its penalties) rather than by reining it in. One provision states that anyone conspiring to break this new law will be subject to the same penalty as if they had committed the crime in question. And even though the bill's language on "exceeding authorized access" has been trimmed a bit, the same language in the section about "unauthorized access" makes the point moot and is still broad enough to be troubling, especially given the law's penalties."
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Is the concept of "Cyberspace" stupid?

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about 2 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "In an article titled "Stop Pretending Cyberspace Exists", Salon writer Michael Lind notes that "Some ideas make you dumber the moment you learn of them. One of those ideas is the concept of 'cyberspace.'” He says that analogizing cyberspace as a real place leads to an inability to think logically about laws, rules, and how and when the governments could or should intervene to regulate the Internet. He states that such a debate is essential, but that that an "[invasion of] a mythical Oz-like kingdom called cyberspace is just as dopey" when talking about governments and corporations taking a larger role in online communications. Is Lind right? Does the notion of cyberspace make the debate over its governance less fruitful?"
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New Music Boss Worse Than Old Music Boss

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "David Lowery, musician (Cracker, Camper Van Beethoven), producer (Sparklehorse, Counting Crows), recording engineer (Archers of Loaf, Lamb of God), and geek (programmer, packet radio operator, ex-CBOT quant) talks about the economics of the music business and how the "old boss" — the record labels — have been replaced by the new boss — file downloading services, song streaming, and commercial online music stores. His take? Although the old boss was often unfair to artists, artists are making even less money under the new boss. Backed with fairly persuasive data, he shows that, under the new distribution model, artists — even small independent ones — are exposed to more risk while making less money. In addition, the old boss was investing in the creation of new music, while the new boss doesn't. This article is lengthy, but worth the attention of anyone interested in the future of music or music distribution."
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Should Reporters be "Truth Vigilantes"

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Arthur S. Brisbane, public editor of the New York Times asks if reporters in this world of balance should become "truth vigilantes"? So rather than reporting facts — i.e., politician said X about Y, even if X is false — should the media become "truth vigilantes" by pointing out that X is indeed false? That the public editor of the New York Times has to ask this is probably an indication that the media has strayed too far towards balance rather than truth. Should the media be worried about truth anymore?"
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Boeing CEO Says Outsourcing Didn't Pay

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The Seattle Times reports that Boeing's CEO is saying that the cost overruns on the 787 "Dreamliner" were greatly exacerbated by the company's heavy use of outsourcing. Although it is now fairly well accepted that outsourcing provides little cost savings and what cost savings there are often get spent in increased management costs and rework, the outsourcing drive goes on. It's nice to see a major industry figure saying that all is not so rosy as the MBAs would have us think."
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US Gov Pressuring Manning to Implicate Assange

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "In his Salon article today, Glenn Greenwald tells of the government's plan to prosecute Julian Assange. In short, the government believes that, if they can get Bradley Manning (the source of the leaked information) to testify that Assange convinced him to leak, they can prosecute Assange under the Espionage Act. As a means to this end, they have been holding Manning in isolation and subjecting him to other inhumane treatment, offering him better treatment should he would be willing to testify. That this would endanger with prosecution any investigative journalist who got information from a military informant has not passed unnoticed."
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RIAA to Appeal Thomas-Rasset Ruling

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The RIAA will appeal the ruling that reduced Jammie Thomas-Rasset's $1.92 fine for file sharing to $54,000.

"It is a shame that Ms. Thomas-Rasset continues to deny any responsibility for her actions rather than accept a reasonable settlement offer and put this case behind her," said RIAA spokeswoman Cara Duckworth.

Joe Sibley, an attorney for Thomas-Rasset, said his client would not settle for the $25,000 that the RIAA has asked for.

"Jammie is not going to agree to pay any amount of money to them," Sibley said, adding that it doesn't matter to Thomas-Rasset whether the damages are $25,000 or $1.92 million.

In addition, Thomas-Rasset's attorneys say that, win or lose, they plan to appeal the constitutionality of the fine."
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Video Title Says it All - HP Computers Are Racist

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The folks at HP have outdone themselves this time. It turns out that when a white person tries to use the tracking software on their laptops, it works fine. When a black person tries? It doesn't work as well (or at all). It could be any number of causes to this fault, but one thing is clear — the more complicated you make something, the greater the chance of unintended consequences."
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Pope Comes Out Against Over-Zealous IP Restriction

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "In his latest encyclical, Benedictine XVI comes out against overly aggressive IP restrictions. In it, he attacks "excessive zeal for protecting knowledge through an unduly rigid assertion of the right to intellectual property, especially in the field of health care." He doesn't seem to be that into a lot of today's capitalism, either — must be that whole uphold-the-downtrodden thing."
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Music From Stock Charts?

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "German composer/artist Johannes Kreidler has digitized various stock charts and other graphs, using Microsoft's SongSmith to generate the backing music. The video produced from the animation of the charts using the music as background is interesting. From his web page (my translation):

The prettiest melodies come from life itself! Every man is an artist — so too, every politician and banker: Songs for millions! Times of crisis are always good for art. Thanks for the music!

"

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Texas BoE Wants Decade of Hol(e)y Evolution

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Clay Burell, 40-year veteran teacher and Apple Distinguished Educator, blogs about a majority in the Texas Board of Education which is likely to vote for state science standards requiring science teachers to teach the (non-existent) "weaknesses or limitations of evolution." The problem? Textbooks used in Texas must align with these standards and as goes Texas (the second largest textbook market in the US, following California), so goes your kids' textbooks, wherever you are in the US. Even worse? These guidelines will be in place for a decade, warping Biology content for that period of time."
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The seven habits of highly subversive people

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Tired of the repression in the US? Want to fight "da man"? Want to be a subversive? A person who grew up in an authoritarian regime tells you how to do it in seven simple habits. Although couched in language of ecological concern Amanda Kovattana gives everyone who wants to get off their butts and make a difference a good set of guidelines."
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