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Rightscorp's New Plan: Hijack Browsers Until Infingers Pay Up

frank_adrian314159 Re:Unconstitutinal (373 comments)

Not in civil cases - there's only apreponderence of the evidence. Besides, I'm pretty sure the ToS you agreed to with your ISP would never let you get past a mediator, let alone into a courtroom.

2 days ago
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Microsoft Considered Renaming Internet Explorer To Escape Its Reputation

frank_adrian314159 Re:agreed (413 comments)

No, the main issues with Vista were the fact that for most of its life, its driver support sucked (It was v1.0 of a new line, what do you expect?) with many really broken ones out of the gate (because they released the OS way too soon for the hardware manufacturers to be ready) and it's broken security model which incessantly asked its users if they were sure whether they wanted to let this or that do something or the other.

They fixed both of these issues (for the most part) in Win7. Which is why people still want Win7.

3 days ago
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Companies That Don't Understand Engineers Don't Respect Engineers

frank_adrian314159 Re:income (371 comments)

I'm sure that's the case overall. Adding in such managers as fast food and chain store shift managers (as well as project managers in tech) will do that for you. What's the average management salary level for people managers in high-tech? That's what the discussion's about.

I'd peg that at average engineers salary about where you put it, but the average for managers is going to be at the $120-140K range.

3 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Dead Is Antivirus, Exactly?

frank_adrian314159 Re:Incentive Bug Finding (322 comments)

You already know that unsecure use of these languages can lead to serious security breaches throughout the system. We have several methods to deal with this kind of insecurity - but they cost, either in development time or needing more people or more process or simply not being able to do certain things. All of which suck.

Honestly, at this point, I really don't see much choice other than putting most of the web on lockdown. We've built our libertarian utopia and due to the intrusion of the real world, it's sort of become a bit of a crapfest. It's time for us to grow up and actually figure out how to govern the place (or at least parts of it) for the greater benefit of all of us, even at the cost of some of our liberties (and, before you yell "I am BennyF's BFF and he who s willing to give up...blah, blah, blah", I'm hoping this governance would be democratic, representative, and permanent, rather than temporary, resulting in a greater enjoyment of this resource for all into the future), rather than letting the whole shebang collapse in a riot of fraud and idiocy.

3 days ago
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Can Our Computers Continue To Get Smaller and More Powerful?

frank_adrian314159 Re:Obligatory: "There's Plenty of Room at the Bott (151 comments)

None of the linked articles even mention Feynman's name.

Why should they? Not many current astrophysics papers mention Galileo, either. Nor do most papers in modern computing reference the work of John von Neumann.

In science, an original idea or suggestion by someone, no matter how famous, is built upon by others, who's work is built upon by others, until someone actually turns an incomplete idea into a field of study. And by this time the literature has evolved to view the problem slightly differently, perhaps more completely, perhaps from a point of view that's more useful from a research point of view. And then these papers by the others who made these changes become the ones that are referenced. It's the cycle of scientific research. And don't think it's because we've forgotten our roots... If you asked the author of this paper, I'm pretty sure he'd start with either Shannon or Feynmann. We leave older references off, because, often it's not relevant to the research you're talking about. And, frankly, your space is already so limited you don't want to spend any on name checks.

But come on, do you really think a 55 year old paper is going to be at the top of impact rankings when computed against current research in a field moving this fast? And, even if so, isn't it more likely this work has been superseded by others? IT'S BEEN 55 GOD DAMN YEARS, FOR CHRISSAKE!!! I think your hero worship is showing. At least find a more modern reference.

about a week ago
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Gartner: Internet of Things Has Reached Hype Peak

frank_adrian314159 Re:comparing hypes (98 comments)

Interesting indeed! It's almost like a puff piece for them, with an underlying message:

See how well Gartner pushed the "Internet of Things" meme! We took it from nothing to peak hype in only three years! Very efficient for your PR dollar, isn't it? You want to know the "new thing", don't you? Heck! You want to invent the "new thing"! In fact, you have a new thing you're inventing right now, don't you? Well, if we write enough reports for you, your category of new thing will be in the buzz and hype forefront! You'll have investors crawling down your shorts looking for jewels! And they're so inexpensive! Remember - nothing to "hype leader" in three years!

'Cause that's what they do - write reports reinforcing what the industry wants to hear about itself to be used as PR. They do it at all levels, too. I've read many of these things at the product level, too. Basically, discount any sales estimates by about 4/5 and lengthen the time frame of any graph by about 150% and it might be accurate*. Hell, I'd love to be in that business, but even I don't have brass ones big enough to "invent the future" like that.

*Which is a interesting measure in and of itself - how much do you have to distort a graph of any prediction to make it match what actually happened.

about a week ago
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Entire South Korean Space Programme Shuts Down As Sole Astronaut Quits

frank_adrian314159 Re:begs FFS (186 comments)

People have debated whether language knowledge should be considered descriptive or prescriptive for centuries. I doubt you two chuckleheads are going to resolve this debate today. Nor do I think Slashdot is the ideal place to resolve this issue. But that's me.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Are Online Job Applications So Badly Designed?

frank_adrian314159 Re:Blame HR ...(what about the Recruiters/Agents?) (274 comments)

How do the Recruiters/Agents submit their chosen candidate applications to HR?

They don't, if they're smart. They may start there, but they parlay their contacts there into contacts in the engineering department whom they start to contact directly to find out about openings. Really, it's all about networking now from the top down. Positions have become too specialized to allow random people to apply. Chances are your manager also knows enough people who need jobs that he doesn't have to go through HR (except for the final paperwork), anyway.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Are Online Job Applications So Badly Designed?

frank_adrian314159 Why? (274 comments)

Because they can be.

People want the jobs, so they use the awful online systems. It's their first step in hating the company they may eventually work for, so it's a head start anyway.

The real issue is that the job match market is so crowded, you have dozens of competing companies selling crappy SaaS job-app systems that various companies use to auto-sort applicants. The problem is that each of these wants to be the only one in the market and, thus, don't want to share information with any of the others. So you end up having to enter, edit, etc. the information for each crappy system and company you want to apply for.

HR departments, job-app sellers? You want to be my friend? You want me to like your company? Here's how:

  • Download my fucking resume from LinkedIn. No I don't like them much, either, but at least it's centralized, accessible, and won't waste my time.
  • No, I don't want to send you a Microsoft Word formatted resume - frankly, text is much more easily parseable and, because I want a decent looking resume that looks the same on all screens, I'm using PDF's anyway. Frankly, there's enough people using non-Microsoft products to create these now days (heard of Google Docs?) that requiring resumes in Word format shows that (a) you're locked in the 1990's or (b) you're a recruiting firm too small and cheap to afford the tools that would allow you to edit a PDF.
  • There have been improvements in matching algorithms such that you don't have to go with Boolean criteria for your filters - use approximate matching and grading cutoffs rather than absolute criteria.
  • Always send an auto-response letting me know my application has been received and is under consideration. If possible, send me a response if I'm no longer under consideration, too. There used to be a thing called common courtesy - if you can't handle that, you're going to look like jerks (and most of you and, by extension, your companies look that way right now).

For those of you looking - just be aware that it's not personal. The people who make or run these systems are just relatively incompetent fucks. You'd have better luck using networking, anyway.

about a week ago
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Silicon Valley Doesn't Have an Attitude Problem, OK?

frank_adrian314159 Re:Tech Community (261 comments)

Can we, perhaps, not refer to the entire tech community as one thing?

The problem is, when you refuse to police your own community, you don't deserve to make this argument.

about a week ago
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New NSA-Funded Code Rolls All Programming Languages Into One

frank_adrian314159 Re:Wyvern = Wyrm (306 comments)

Yes. A company I worked with tried an blah-XL based language, too. The thing was a nightmare. If you didn't have a decent editor handy, you were up shit creek. Simple to poorly indent, leading to misunderstanding in scope and structure, while simultaneously being syntactically bulky and hard to read, XML a great notation to hate.

Whatever your language was, if it had anything at all to do with XML syntactically (other than throwing its syntax away), it's probably an example of this: A programmer had the problem of designing a data representation. He chose XML and now he has two problems.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: "Real" Computer Scientists vs. Modern Curriculum?

frank_adrian314159 Re:Beards and suspenders. (637 comments)

I can't believe that you can graduate with a CS degree today without having at least one assembly language class which should show you about bit-twiddling and memory management just a bit. Not to mention an OS class that would expose you to exercises to modify a Linux kernel - written in C.

What do they actually teach in a CS degree these days? Don't tell me... Gamification, HTML, CSS, and Javascript, right? Do they actually make you take a database or an algorithms class any more?

about two weeks ago
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Why Morgan Stanley Is Betting That Tesla Will Kill Your Power Company

frank_adrian314159 Re:In the words of Grumpy Cat....Good (502 comments)

As opposed to individual contaminated ground water wells? Or a million homes' pipes somehow stuck out into the lake? WTF?

Or are you just bad at coming up with analogies? Because those are the water installations analogous to the situation described.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do About the Sorry State of FOSS Documentation?

frank_adrian314159 Re:Nothing (430 comments)

Nah, without the foul words, it wouldn't be accurate. Most are motherfuckers (i.e., their mothers are the only person that would find them lovable enough to fuck).

about two weeks ago
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For Half, Degrees In Computing, Math, Or Stats Lead To Other Jobs

frank_adrian314159 Re:STEM is the new liberal arts degree (174 comments)

I've been in the industry for over a decade, and have used the calculus and statistics required for my CS degree precisely never.

Well, I've been in the industry for over 30 years and I've found one good use for statistics during that time - it's great to sniff out BS. Like the crap spread by the VP of Quality who touts a 2% decline in customer calls YOY when the variance in this yearly data is around 5% and you didn't put out a major product release this year. Not that you're politically well-connected enough to call him on it, of course, but it's good to know that it's crap nonetheless, because next year, when you do get the next major version out, and the customer calls go up, you'll be ready to defend politically.

about a month ago
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'Just Let Me Code!'

frank_adrian314159 Re:So what is the solution? (372 comments)

Yeah, sounds like EMACS except for not having an OS thrown in... but maybe they just forgot to mention that.

about a month ago
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Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

frank_adrian314159 Re:Liar Paradox (102 comments)

Worked in Star Trek every time! It's the only way to defeat a computer (well, that or pull its plug). It comes of being binary, you know. Poor things...

about a month ago
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Microsoft CEO To Slash 18,000 Jobs, 12,500 From Nokia To Go

frank_adrian314159 Re:And in totally unrelated news.... (383 comments)

If you don't play the game, the mutual funds won't like your stock and your stock, potentially affecting the share price negatively. Then the board gets all pissy and you don't get as big of bonus. So you play the game. You didn't understand that?

Situations start when there are multiple players in the market and one can obtain acute, short-term benefit by causing more diffuse, long-term harm - unless all players participate in the harmful action, they will suffer more with neither short- nor long-term gains. The efficiency that using economics as a model in this case brings merely ensures that this harm accumulates as quickly as possible.

about a month ago
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Sexual Harassment Is Common In Scientific Fieldwork

frank_adrian314159 Re:Some people hook up (362 comments)

That kind of rule used to be fairly rampant in some of the more stodgy firms back in the day, started becoming more rare in the '80s, was almost gone in the 90's, and most folks younger than 40 or so, have probably not seen one. Us older folk, though...

These days, it's been supplanted by a looser interpretation saying that you can't be "related to" someone you're supervising (or vice versa) and there are strong cultural norms to not be involved with someone within your chain of command.

about a month ago

Submissions

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FCC doesn't care about net neutrality anymore

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about 4 months ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The New York Times reports that, after a recent SCOTUS ruling ripped apart current net neutrality rules, the FCC has decided that net neutrality isn't worth arguing over — it's now perfectly fine for carriers (including your last mile providers) to charge different rates for different data. If Congress wants to change this, they can, but until then, the FCC has decided that this debate isn't worth debating any more."
Link to Original Source
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New CFAA "Reform" Draft Makes Law Even Worse

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about a year ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "After the Aaron Swartz suicide, people had hoped that CFAA would be modified to be less draconian. Our naivete knows no bounds. Salon reports that the new draft of the modified CFAA makes the law even worse by expanding it (and its penalties) rather than by reining it in. One provision states that anyone conspiring to break this new law will be subject to the same penalty as if they had committed the crime in question. And even though the bill's language on "exceeding authorized access" has been trimmed a bit, the same language in the section about "unauthorized access" makes the point moot and is still broad enough to be troubling, especially given the law's penalties."
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Is the concept of "Cyberspace" stupid?

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "In an article titled "Stop Pretending Cyberspace Exists", Salon writer Michael Lind notes that "Some ideas make you dumber the moment you learn of them. One of those ideas is the concept of 'cyberspace.'” He says that analogizing cyberspace as a real place leads to an inability to think logically about laws, rules, and how and when the governments could or should intervene to regulate the Internet. He states that such a debate is essential, but that that an "[invasion of] a mythical Oz-like kingdom called cyberspace is just as dopey" when talking about governments and corporations taking a larger role in online communications. Is Lind right? Does the notion of cyberspace make the debate over its governance less fruitful?"
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New Music Boss Worse Than Old Music Boss

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "David Lowery, musician (Cracker, Camper Van Beethoven), producer (Sparklehorse, Counting Crows), recording engineer (Archers of Loaf, Lamb of God), and geek (programmer, packet radio operator, ex-CBOT quant) talks about the economics of the music business and how the "old boss" — the record labels — have been replaced by the new boss — file downloading services, song streaming, and commercial online music stores. His take? Although the old boss was often unfair to artists, artists are making even less money under the new boss. Backed with fairly persuasive data, he shows that, under the new distribution model, artists — even small independent ones — are exposed to more risk while making less money. In addition, the old boss was investing in the creation of new music, while the new boss doesn't. This article is lengthy, but worth the attention of anyone interested in the future of music or music distribution."
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Should Reporters be "Truth Vigilantes"

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Arthur S. Brisbane, public editor of the New York Times asks if reporters in this world of balance should become "truth vigilantes"? So rather than reporting facts — i.e., politician said X about Y, even if X is false — should the media become "truth vigilantes" by pointing out that X is indeed false? That the public editor of the New York Times has to ask this is probably an indication that the media has strayed too far towards balance rather than truth. Should the media be worried about truth anymore?"
Link to Original Source
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Boeing CEO Says Outsourcing Didn't Pay

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The Seattle Times reports that Boeing's CEO is saying that the cost overruns on the 787 "Dreamliner" were greatly exacerbated by the company's heavy use of outsourcing. Although it is now fairly well accepted that outsourcing provides little cost savings and what cost savings there are often get spent in increased management costs and rework, the outsourcing drive goes on. It's nice to see a major industry figure saying that all is not so rosy as the MBAs would have us think."
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US Gov Pressuring Manning to Implicate Assange

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "In his Salon article today, Glenn Greenwald tells of the government's plan to prosecute Julian Assange. In short, the government believes that, if they can get Bradley Manning (the source of the leaked information) to testify that Assange convinced him to leak, they can prosecute Assange under the Espionage Act. As a means to this end, they have been holding Manning in isolation and subjecting him to other inhumane treatment, offering him better treatment should he would be willing to testify. That this would endanger with prosecution any investigative journalist who got information from a military informant has not passed unnoticed."
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RIAA to Appeal Thomas-Rasset Ruling

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The RIAA will appeal the ruling that reduced Jammie Thomas-Rasset's $1.92 fine for file sharing to $54,000.

"It is a shame that Ms. Thomas-Rasset continues to deny any responsibility for her actions rather than accept a reasonable settlement offer and put this case behind her," said RIAA spokeswoman Cara Duckworth.

Joe Sibley, an attorney for Thomas-Rasset, said his client would not settle for the $25,000 that the RIAA has asked for.

"Jammie is not going to agree to pay any amount of money to them," Sibley said, adding that it doesn't matter to Thomas-Rasset whether the damages are $25,000 or $1.92 million.

In addition, Thomas-Rasset's attorneys say that, win or lose, they plan to appeal the constitutionality of the fine."
Link to Original Source

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Video Title Says it All - HP Computers Are Racist

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The folks at HP have outdone themselves this time. It turns out that when a white person tries to use the tracking software on their laptops, it works fine. When a black person tries? It doesn't work as well (or at all). It could be any number of causes to this fault, but one thing is clear — the more complicated you make something, the greater the chance of unintended consequences."
Link to Original Source
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Pope Comes Out Against Over-Zealous IP Restriction

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "In his latest encyclical, Benedictine XVI comes out against overly aggressive IP restrictions. In it, he attacks "excessive zeal for protecting knowledge through an unduly rigid assertion of the right to intellectual property, especially in the field of health care." He doesn't seem to be that into a lot of today's capitalism, either — must be that whole uphold-the-downtrodden thing."
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Music From Stock Charts?

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "German composer/artist Johannes Kreidler has digitized various stock charts and other graphs, using Microsoft's SongSmith to generate the backing music. The video produced from the animation of the charts using the music as background is interesting. From his web page (my translation):

The prettiest melodies come from life itself! Every man is an artist — so too, every politician and banker: Songs for millions! Times of crisis are always good for art. Thanks for the music!

"

Link to Original Source
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Texas BoE Wants Decade of Hol(e)y Evolution

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Clay Burell, 40-year veteran teacher and Apple Distinguished Educator, blogs about a majority in the Texas Board of Education which is likely to vote for state science standards requiring science teachers to teach the (non-existent) "weaknesses or limitations of evolution." The problem? Textbooks used in Texas must align with these standards and as goes Texas (the second largest textbook market in the US, following California), so goes your kids' textbooks, wherever you are in the US. Even worse? These guidelines will be in place for a decade, warping Biology content for that period of time."
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The seven habits of highly subversive people

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about 7 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Tired of the repression in the US? Want to fight "da man"? Want to be a subversive? A person who grew up in an authoritarian regime tells you how to do it in seven simple habits. Although couched in language of ecological concern Amanda Kovattana gives everyone who wants to get off their butts and make a difference a good set of guidelines."
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