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Comments

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Ballmer Says Amazon Isn't a "Real Business"

frank_adrian314159 I for one will mis Steve! (214 comments)

I know that comes as a shock to many of you, but it's true - I will miss him. Motherfucker was comedy gold. Where else do you go for that these days? Schmidt? Fucking gray man in a fucking gray suit. Same with Tim Cook - you can put him in jeans, but he just is a guy hat would rather be in a boardroom than on a stage. Larry Ellison? Scary (appropriate for the season), but not funny. The new guy? Nadella? Has the whole exotic foreigner befuddlement thing down (and that's just with respect to HR practice vs. tech culture), but I figure he's not going to be the full-on Olympic chair-throwing, "developers, developers, developers", "I'm going to squirt you with my Zune", "fucking kill Google" sort of guy that Balmer was.

I'm just saying an age has passed. Nothing but gray men, as far as the eye can see. I love my new oligarchs.

7 hours ago
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The Inevitable Death of the Internet Troll

frank_adrian314159 Re:Every troll dies, children. Not every troll tru (546 comments)

Not every troll truly lives.,P>Actually, no troll really lives, for he or she is more broken than most. Unable to gain positive attention, they settle for (and attempt to cause) negative attention - it's better than not being noticed at all, isn't it?

In the final analysis, trolls are really just sad, pathetic people. So fuck 'em.

2 days ago
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Microsoft, Ask.com, Oracle Latest To Be Sued Over No-Poach Deal

frank_adrian314159 Re:wait a second... (47 comments)

Their "toolbar" hides in Oracle's installer for Java. The parasite... nay, symbiote, uses this installer as a vector to infect unsuspecting computers, the end result being the madness of innocent system administrators and dragooned relatives helping Grandma figure out why her system is so slow because she hasn't sprung for new hardware since the mid-Nineteen-Fucking-Nineties and it's a GODDAMN Windows Machine And... MOTHER OF GOD! I don't believe this! It's XP and it Has Every Piece of Malware Since the DAWN OF TIME INSTALLED ON IT AND I HAVE TO CLEAN IT ALL OFF BECAUSE SHE COULDN'T LOSE THE MOTHERFUCKING CAT VIDEO HER &^!!%(*!&$!&^*$#! FRIEND CHARLENE SENT HER AND THE SENILE OLD BIDDY CAN'T REMEMBER... uh, where she put it... ahem, um sorry, where was I? Oh, yeah...

I've seen it far too many times for it to be a phantom. A zombie, perhaps, shambling along on toolbar installations by those too green or momentarily distracted or forgetful... So, even if it is dead, it lives! IT LIVES!

3 days ago
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Shooting At Canadian Parliament

frank_adrian314159 Re:Why (522 comments)

Uh, no. You assume that making the country an even larger police state would help. But I'm sure the Canadians already had about as big a police state as it needed.

And the fuss over incidents involving two persons? Out of millions that live in and travel through Canada each year? Seems like their police apparatus is working pretty well from my point of view.

You talk as if we could bring an end to the threat of someone doing something nefarious, if only we just did something (think of the chil... soldiers). But you know what? We're doing enough. The actual count of terrorism deaths compared with just about any other cause should convince just about anyone of that. But when your argument is emotional, I guess facts don't matter (but still we try...).

So, no, neither Canada, nor the US, nor does just about any developed country need a bigger police, monitoring, border-controlling, etc. apparatus. They should probably try a bit harder to make sure that wealth and opportunity are distributed a bit more equitably and that people have a bit more say in what's being done for/to them and that might be a bit more cost-effective, but it's also a tangent along which I will not proceed further.

What is clear is that freedom is built on acceptable losses. You can debate acceptable loss levels, but the fact of those losses never go away. Talking about acceptable levels and what is needed to achieve those levels might generate a fruitful discussion but, somehow, I don't think you want to talk about things that way.

3 days ago
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What It Took For SpaceX To Become a Serious Space Company

frank_adrian314159 Huh? (95 comments)

SpaceX's costs are still nowhere near low enough to change the economics of space as Musk and his investors envision, but they have a plan to do so (of which more later).

Long extension cord?

3 days ago
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Xerox Alto Source Code Released To Public

frank_adrian314159 Re:It would be interesting (121 comments)

It was a 16-bit architecture. Use the Wiki:

Alto was a microcoded design but, unlike many computers, the microcode engine was not hidden from the programmer in a layered design. Applications such as Pinball took advantage of this to accelerate performance. The Alto had a bit-slice arithmetic logic unit (ALU) based on the Texas Instruments' 74181 chip, a ROM control store with a writable control store extension and had 128 (expandable to 512) kB of main memory organized in 16-bit words. Mass storage was provided by a hard disk drive that used a removable 2.5 MB single-platter cartridge (Diablo Systems, a company Xerox later bought) similar to those used by the IBM 2310. The base machine and one disk were housed in a cabinet about the size of a small refrigerator; one additional disk could be added in daisy-chain fashion.

It would be relatively simple to come up with an emulator that could run well. Although I'd rather see a Dandelion clone, anyway - I knew all about the AMD 2900 series, back in the day.

3 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Aging and Orphan Open Source Projects?

frank_adrian314159 Re:Retired developers (154 comments)

Or it's customary in your country for all people at retirement age to perform ritual suicide?

No, we just let them starve to death.

3 days ago
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NPR: '80s Ads Are Responsible For the Lack of Women Coders

frank_adrian314159 Re:Boy toy (767 comments)

Does this explain the lack of female pop singers today?

You're noticing a lack? If anything, the market seems oversupplied to me. Or maybe it just seems that way because the quality is so spotty.

4 days ago
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Delivering Malicious Android Apps Hidden In Image Files

frank_adrian314159 Re:Unlikely (113 comments)

It won't hurt crypto algorithms unless their names are both Alice.

4 days ago
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Doctor Who To Teach Kids To Code

frank_adrian314159 It's not every day you get to... (164 comments)

Apparently the BBC thinks upgrading psychopathic, racist death machines is a good idea!

Doesn't everybody?

4 days ago
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IBM Pays GlobalFoundries $1.5 Billion To Shed Its Chip Division

frank_adrian314159 Re:How on earth? (84 comments)

How on earth do they find "pay someone a billion and a half to take this business" to be cheaper than just shutting the entire thing down?

Because maybe they can't just shut it down? Perhaps they still need the chips for a while until they can migrate their hardware to other chips?

5 days ago
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The Largest Ship In the World Is Being Built In Korea

frank_adrian314159 Re:inbuilt scrap capabilities (274 comments)

Why no to build-in [sic] capabilities for a ship to break itself easily?

Because it might then break itself while it's underway, rather than waiting until it got to the shipyard?

5 days ago
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Despite Patent Settlement, Apple Pulls Bose Merchandise From Its Stores

frank_adrian314159 Re:Bose is overpriced crap and always has been (328 comments)

Sennheiser? Yes.

Their HD202s have been available 5/$89 at BSW for the past ten years (which is also why you see Sennheisers in radio a lot). They're good enough for voice work and are often used in recording studios for tracking. And even at their low cost they still sound better than Beats or Bose stuff.

about a week ago
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Despite Patent Settlement, Apple Pulls Bose Merchandise From Its Stores

frank_adrian314159 Re:Bose is overpriced crap and always has been (328 comments)

Yes. And you can have my AKG headphones when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers. Even at the cost of a comparable set of Beats headphones they are so much better than those PoSs. Same for Bose. I can actually hear balanced sound and detail from my AKGs. I use them for audio editing. I can definitely hear the difference. I say to anyone that buys either Beats or Bose (or other consumer stuff) to at least upgrade to a prosumer level of headphones from one of the manufacturers listed in the parent post - your ears will thank you.

about a week ago
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The One App You Need On Your Resume If You Want a Job At Google

frank_adrian314159 Re:Matlab is not elegant, but it is useful (205 comments)

You forgot to mention the even more impressive format function in Common Lisp that can print out roman numerals for you, not to mention its built-in iteration constructs, which you folks copied for your fmt function.

about a week ago
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Cisco Exec: Turnover In Engineering No Problem

frank_adrian314159 Re:The essence of enterprise (148 comments)

... there is no way to know what works best and what is worst: you have nothing to compare against and no motivation to become better.

You haven't heard of metrics other than dollars?

about a week ago
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OS X 10.10 Yosemite Review

frank_adrian314159 Re:Minimalism Overkill (303 comments)

Stop assuming that simplicity is the only aesthetic principle - even Modernists hate living in Modernist houses.

about a week ago
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OS X 10.10 Yosemite Review

frank_adrian314159 Wait, wait... (303 comments)

When did they run out of cats? Or dd they mummify them and bury them all with Steve Jobs?

about a week ago

Submissions

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FCC doesn't care about net neutrality anymore

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about 6 months ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The New York Times reports that, after a recent SCOTUS ruling ripped apart current net neutrality rules, the FCC has decided that net neutrality isn't worth arguing over — it's now perfectly fine for carriers (including your last mile providers) to charge different rates for different data. If Congress wants to change this, they can, but until then, the FCC has decided that this debate isn't worth debating any more."
Link to Original Source
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New CFAA "Reform" Draft Makes Law Even Worse

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "After the Aaron Swartz suicide, people had hoped that CFAA would be modified to be less draconian. Our naivete knows no bounds. Salon reports that the new draft of the modified CFAA makes the law even worse by expanding it (and its penalties) rather than by reining it in. One provision states that anyone conspiring to break this new law will be subject to the same penalty as if they had committed the crime in question. And even though the bill's language on "exceeding authorized access" has been trimmed a bit, the same language in the section about "unauthorized access" makes the point moot and is still broad enough to be troubling, especially given the law's penalties."
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Is the concept of "Cyberspace" stupid?

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "In an article titled "Stop Pretending Cyberspace Exists", Salon writer Michael Lind notes that "Some ideas make you dumber the moment you learn of them. One of those ideas is the concept of 'cyberspace.'” He says that analogizing cyberspace as a real place leads to an inability to think logically about laws, rules, and how and when the governments could or should intervene to regulate the Internet. He states that such a debate is essential, but that that an "[invasion of] a mythical Oz-like kingdom called cyberspace is just as dopey" when talking about governments and corporations taking a larger role in online communications. Is Lind right? Does the notion of cyberspace make the debate over its governance less fruitful?"
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New Music Boss Worse Than Old Music Boss

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "David Lowery, musician (Cracker, Camper Van Beethoven), producer (Sparklehorse, Counting Crows), recording engineer (Archers of Loaf, Lamb of God), and geek (programmer, packet radio operator, ex-CBOT quant) talks about the economics of the music business and how the "old boss" — the record labels — have been replaced by the new boss — file downloading services, song streaming, and commercial online music stores. His take? Although the old boss was often unfair to artists, artists are making even less money under the new boss. Backed with fairly persuasive data, he shows that, under the new distribution model, artists — even small independent ones — are exposed to more risk while making less money. In addition, the old boss was investing in the creation of new music, while the new boss doesn't. This article is lengthy, but worth the attention of anyone interested in the future of music or music distribution."
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Should Reporters be "Truth Vigilantes"

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Arthur S. Brisbane, public editor of the New York Times asks if reporters in this world of balance should become "truth vigilantes"? So rather than reporting facts — i.e., politician said X about Y, even if X is false — should the media become "truth vigilantes" by pointing out that X is indeed false? That the public editor of the New York Times has to ask this is probably an indication that the media has strayed too far towards balance rather than truth. Should the media be worried about truth anymore?"
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Boeing CEO Says Outsourcing Didn't Pay

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The Seattle Times reports that Boeing's CEO is saying that the cost overruns on the 787 "Dreamliner" were greatly exacerbated by the company's heavy use of outsourcing. Although it is now fairly well accepted that outsourcing provides little cost savings and what cost savings there are often get spent in increased management costs and rework, the outsourcing drive goes on. It's nice to see a major industry figure saying that all is not so rosy as the MBAs would have us think."
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US Gov Pressuring Manning to Implicate Assange

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "In his Salon article today, Glenn Greenwald tells of the government's plan to prosecute Julian Assange. In short, the government believes that, if they can get Bradley Manning (the source of the leaked information) to testify that Assange convinced him to leak, they can prosecute Assange under the Espionage Act. As a means to this end, they have been holding Manning in isolation and subjecting him to other inhumane treatment, offering him better treatment should he would be willing to testify. That this would endanger with prosecution any investigative journalist who got information from a military informant has not passed unnoticed."
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RIAA to Appeal Thomas-Rasset Ruling

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The RIAA will appeal the ruling that reduced Jammie Thomas-Rasset's $1.92 fine for file sharing to $54,000.

"It is a shame that Ms. Thomas-Rasset continues to deny any responsibility for her actions rather than accept a reasonable settlement offer and put this case behind her," said RIAA spokeswoman Cara Duckworth.

Joe Sibley, an attorney for Thomas-Rasset, said his client would not settle for the $25,000 that the RIAA has asked for.

"Jammie is not going to agree to pay any amount of money to them," Sibley said, adding that it doesn't matter to Thomas-Rasset whether the damages are $25,000 or $1.92 million.

In addition, Thomas-Rasset's attorneys say that, win or lose, they plan to appeal the constitutionality of the fine."
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Video Title Says it All - HP Computers Are Racist

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The folks at HP have outdone themselves this time. It turns out that when a white person tries to use the tracking software on their laptops, it works fine. When a black person tries? It doesn't work as well (or at all). It could be any number of causes to this fault, but one thing is clear — the more complicated you make something, the greater the chance of unintended consequences."
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Pope Comes Out Against Over-Zealous IP Restriction

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "In his latest encyclical, Benedictine XVI comes out against overly aggressive IP restrictions. In it, he attacks "excessive zeal for protecting knowledge through an unduly rigid assertion of the right to intellectual property, especially in the field of health care." He doesn't seem to be that into a lot of today's capitalism, either — must be that whole uphold-the-downtrodden thing."
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Music From Stock Charts?

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "German composer/artist Johannes Kreidler has digitized various stock charts and other graphs, using Microsoft's SongSmith to generate the backing music. The video produced from the animation of the charts using the music as background is interesting. From his web page (my translation):

The prettiest melodies come from life itself! Every man is an artist — so too, every politician and banker: Songs for millions! Times of crisis are always good for art. Thanks for the music!

"

Link to Original Source
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Texas BoE Wants Decade of Hol(e)y Evolution

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Clay Burell, 40-year veteran teacher and Apple Distinguished Educator, blogs about a majority in the Texas Board of Education which is likely to vote for state science standards requiring science teachers to teach the (non-existent) "weaknesses or limitations of evolution." The problem? Textbooks used in Texas must align with these standards and as goes Texas (the second largest textbook market in the US, following California), so goes your kids' textbooks, wherever you are in the US. Even worse? These guidelines will be in place for a decade, warping Biology content for that period of time."
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The seven habits of highly subversive people

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Tired of the repression in the US? Want to fight "da man"? Want to be a subversive? A person who grew up in an authoritarian regime tells you how to do it in seven simple habits. Although couched in language of ecological concern Amanda Kovattana gives everyone who wants to get off their butts and make a difference a good set of guidelines."
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