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Comments

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Microsoft CEO To Slash 18,000 Jobs, 12,500 From Nokia To Go

frank_adrian314159 Re:And in totally unrelated news.... (381 comments)

If you don't play the game, the mutual funds won't like your stock and your stock, potentially affecting the share price negatively. Then the board gets all pissy and you don't get as big of bonus. So you play the game. You didn't understand that?

Situations start when there are multiple players in the market and one can obtain acute, short-term benefit by causing more diffuse, long-term harm - unless all players participate in the harmful action, they will suffer more with neither short- nor long-term gains. The efficiency that using economics as a model in this case brings merely ensures that this harm accumulates as quickly as possible.

5 days ago
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Sexual Harassment Is Common In Scientific Fieldwork

frank_adrian314159 Re:Some people hook up (362 comments)

That kind of rule used to be fairly rampant in some of the more stodgy firms back in the day, started becoming more rare in the '80s, was almost gone in the 90's, and most folks younger than 40 or so, have probably not seen one. Us older folk, though...

These days, it's been supplanted by a looser interpretation saying that you can't be "related to" someone you're supervising (or vice versa) and there are strong cultural norms to not be involved with someone within your chain of command.

5 days ago
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Why the FCC Is Likely To Ignore Net Neutrality Comments and Listen To ISPs

frank_adrian314159 Re:Maybe not. (140 comments)

Remember that this "deluge" of comments are spread across the entire nation. You have... what? ~1M comments? That's only about 2200 per legislative district (which now averages a little less than 1M people/district) - this counts astroturf and anti-openness advocates, too. Even being generous here, you probably work out to less than 0.2% of people caring enough to complain. People willing to switch votes over that issue? Less than that. People in safe districts voting for "the other side"? Ha!

Given the numbers here, I don't think they give a rat's ass one way or another what that "huge" number of people commenting is going to do with respect to elections.

5 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Future-Proof Jobs?

frank_adrian314159 Re:No such thing as future proofing, of course . . (507 comments)

What would you say that the automated systems that allowed the process refinements did to those kind of jobs then? Frankly, automation replacing those people sounds like a pretty good description, especially since the process refinement allowing those people to be terminated could have only come about using automation.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Future-Proof Jobs?

frank_adrian314159 Re:Plumber, Gardner, HVAC repair (507 comments)

Law sucks any more according to all the lawyers I know. Big glut. Civil service? Haven't you heard - everyone wants to cut government. Any other ideas?

about a week ago
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White House Punts On Petition To Allow Tesla Direct Sales

frank_adrian314159 Re:Can't wave law? (382 comments)

A president who decides to ignore some laws and pretend thats executive discretion is on incredibly shakey ground; it undermines the whole foundation of the legislative branch's power.

Show me a single president in the last 200 years of our country that had the resources to actively enforce ALL Federal laws. And then it would only be fair if they enforced them equally against all individuals. You want a police state? There's one for the grabbing.

I'd accuse you of holding this particular President to a higher standard than any other, but since I don't attribute to malice that which can be easily explained by stupidity, I'll make an exception in your case.

about a week ago
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White House Punts On Petition To Allow Tesla Direct Sales

frank_adrian314159 Re:Not a duty of the Executive Branch (382 comments)

The White House should respond by providing links to state and federal representatives if they want the law changed.

Why? Can an organization like Tesla not find people smart enough to look them up? Are we not smart enough to know where to look? Or so disengaged we don't know which ones to write? For those like that, here's a start. Tesla should be happy that the administration didn't actively try to work against them.

This is a rich boy whining that he's being oppressed by the system. The only thing that irks me is the fanboys here that seem to want to change this because of "bright, shiny" and "change is good". Note that the jobs Tesla would provide if they got the ability to sell their cars direct probably number many less than the ones provided by current dealerships (and the counterparts needed in the auto companies to deal with said dealers) and that unemployment is still a problem here. Again, Elon should feel lucky that the WH staff didn't send a response about how things are fine as they are and tell him to STFU. That's what you would have gotten if you wanted something. Ask marijuana growers (a much bigger market than electric cars) in Washington or Colorado about that.

about a week ago
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White House Punts On Petition To Allow Tesla Direct Sales

frank_adrian314159 Re:Ha, made me laugh. (382 comments)

Yeah. Like Tesla's phrasing vs. the White House's would make any difference. Last I checked, the unemployment rate was still 6% and worse for the long-term unemployed and older workers, but you can't get the House to move on an unemployment benefit extension. What makes Elon think that his 1% entitlement is any more urgent than any other 1 percenter's desire to keep unemployment benefits away from people? Or from keeping his car off the streets? The Congress obviously has other, better fish to fry. And there are more of the 1% that stand to lose than to gain from Tesla's desire to sell direct. Obama was right on this call - it is Congress' job and nothing he says can make it happen. Be happy his staff didn't come out against the idea entirely.

I think Elon's problem is that he is still naive enough to think that our country's press releases about wanting to be an innovative place is true. In reality, it's a country - it wants to provide a stable environment for its current businesses. What innovation is allowed to happen will be controlled. Elon's idea was just a bit too big for this country.

about a week ago
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Google's Project Zero Aims To Find Exploits Before Attackers Do

frank_adrian314159 Well... (62 comments)

If its like their past behaviors, they'll tell everyone unless the government asks them not to under penalty of law - and they'll have the FISA court paperwork to make it stick. After all, Google now has a responsibility to its shareholders to not do illegal things, right? As such, I can't see this as more than a PR stunt.

about a week ago
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The Last Three Months Were the Hottest Quarter On Record

frank_adrian314159 Re:Libertarian opinion on science... (552 comments)

Better make sure there's a True Scottsman around for us to verify your statement with.

about a week ago
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Massive Job Cuts Are Reportedly Coming For Microsoft Employees

frank_adrian314159 Re:Dropping the Xbox? (300 comments)

Because even though the losses might not be "that terrible", they're still losses? Because the growth in "gaming consoles" is deteriorating due to cannibalization of the low end (where most people live) by the mobile market? Because, in terms of money, mobile comm is the bigger market and they want to concentrate on that side of things a bit more? Because companies have to make decisions like this all the time and they've decided that not making money in a relatively quickly growing market for the past ten years is a pretty fucking good indicator for what the future holds for them in this market, especially when the growth rate in mobile games is swamping the growth rate (note I didn't say overall sales) in consoles?

Seems like a pretty rational decision on Microsoft's part. Maybe this new CEO can do the right things...

about a week ago
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Court Rejects Fox's Attempt to Use Aereo Ruling Against Dish's Hopper

frank_adrian314159 Re: Can't use duck test and rational argument (67 comments)

The scenario here is so unlikely for the normal Slashdot reader as to render your point moot here.

about a week ago
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How a Supercomputer Beat the Scrap Heap and Lived On To Retire In Africa

frank_adrian314159 Re:Nice (145 comments)

I don't think you'd like to pay the power bill. That being said, if I was going to waste money on something like that, I'd go with a Cray-1. At least you could use it as a bench.

about a week ago
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Obama Administration Says the World's Servers Are Ours

frank_adrian314159 Re:You have this backwards. (749 comments)

You know, withholding evidence obtained from a third party to hide it from a legal warrant is probably illegal, too - even if you secreted the evidence out to another country. This is a delaying tactic on Microsoft's part. They'll cave in the end.

about a week ago
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Utility Wants $17,500 Refund After Failure To Scrub Negative Search Results

frank_adrian314159 Re:That's Fine (110 comments)

On the flip side, if there are outages or faults you almost automatically acquire a negative view of them and again there isn't really a lot they can do to counteract it.

On the other hand, if you have a swift, efficient, and high quality service for an outage, most people understand that things fail and will forgive. It's only when YOU SUCK, repeatedly and without meeting customer needs in a quick and reliable way, that you get real negatives. And, if you actually work to improve these things (e.g., bury above-ground wires to improve reliability, more, smaller substations to limit outages, etc.) and promote these useful activities, you'll get even more positives. So, in short, I think this is an issue of a company coasting and the CEO being an asshat about being criticized while his company coasts. Maybe he ought to think about improvong service so people don't hate him.

about a week ago
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Slashdot Asks: Do You Want a Smart Watch?

frank_adrian314159 Re:Slashdot Asks v. Ask Slashdot (381 comments)

I think they only care about eyeballs per advertisement.

The profit for that strategy is limited because soon you have no eyeballs and no eyeballs leads shortly after that to no advertisements.

about two weeks ago
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Climate Change Skeptic Group Must Pay Damages To UVA, Michael Mann

frank_adrian314159 Re:"Thus ends "Climategate." Hopefully." (497 comments)

The statistic is not 97% of Scientists then is it.

Yeah, you're right. It's 97% of scientists who actually know what they're talking about instead of a population that includes a bunch of kibitzing amateurs who don't actually understand what they're going on about. But I guess that about 97% of the readers here think you're an idiot because you believe that makes some difference with respect to the actual sciencey stuff. Thanks for defending the planet wreckers - it helps to make the place so much more wonderful!

about two weeks ago
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Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

frank_adrian314159 Re:Want to pay for behavior riskier than yours? (353 comments)

How many tailgaters would continue to tailgate if it was as simple as slamming on the breaks to ruin them financially...

Most of them. You seem to have a overestimation of how rational human actors are and how well deterrence works. The number of "Fuck it! I'm insured!" accidents (as you put it) are vanishingly small because insurance companies almost never pay the entire amount that would make the people involved in the accident whole in addition to the fact that most most people don't have insanely low deductible policies.

about two weeks ago
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TSA Prohibits Taking Discharged Electronic Devices Onto Planes

frank_adrian314159 Re:In other News (702 comments)

Yep, traveling with Granny might hinder your ability to make connecting flights.

You mean more than she already does? Inconceivable!

about two weeks ago
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TSA Prohibits Taking Discharged Electronic Devices Onto Planes

frank_adrian314159 Re:Actually makes good sense (702 comments)

In all airports I've seen, they're past the security checkpoints.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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FCC doesn't care about net neutrality anymore

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about 2 months ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The New York Times reports that, after a recent SCOTUS ruling ripped apart current net neutrality rules, the FCC has decided that net neutrality isn't worth arguing over — it's now perfectly fine for carriers (including your last mile providers) to charge different rates for different data. If Congress wants to change this, they can, but until then, the FCC has decided that this debate isn't worth debating any more."
Link to Original Source
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New CFAA "Reform" Draft Makes Law Even Worse

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about a year ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "After the Aaron Swartz suicide, people had hoped that CFAA would be modified to be less draconian. Our naivete knows no bounds. Salon reports that the new draft of the modified CFAA makes the law even worse by expanding it (and its penalties) rather than by reining it in. One provision states that anyone conspiring to break this new law will be subject to the same penalty as if they had committed the crime in question. And even though the bill's language on "exceeding authorized access" has been trimmed a bit, the same language in the section about "unauthorized access" makes the point moot and is still broad enough to be troubling, especially given the law's penalties."
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Is the concept of "Cyberspace" stupid?

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "In an article titled "Stop Pretending Cyberspace Exists", Salon writer Michael Lind notes that "Some ideas make you dumber the moment you learn of them. One of those ideas is the concept of 'cyberspace.'” He says that analogizing cyberspace as a real place leads to an inability to think logically about laws, rules, and how and when the governments could or should intervene to regulate the Internet. He states that such a debate is essential, but that that an "[invasion of] a mythical Oz-like kingdom called cyberspace is just as dopey" when talking about governments and corporations taking a larger role in online communications. Is Lind right? Does the notion of cyberspace make the debate over its governance less fruitful?"
Link to Original Source
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New Music Boss Worse Than Old Music Boss

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "David Lowery, musician (Cracker, Camper Van Beethoven), producer (Sparklehorse, Counting Crows), recording engineer (Archers of Loaf, Lamb of God), and geek (programmer, packet radio operator, ex-CBOT quant) talks about the economics of the music business and how the "old boss" — the record labels — have been replaced by the new boss — file downloading services, song streaming, and commercial online music stores. His take? Although the old boss was often unfair to artists, artists are making even less money under the new boss. Backed with fairly persuasive data, he shows that, under the new distribution model, artists — even small independent ones — are exposed to more risk while making less money. In addition, the old boss was investing in the creation of new music, while the new boss doesn't. This article is lengthy, but worth the attention of anyone interested in the future of music or music distribution."
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Should Reporters be "Truth Vigilantes"

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Arthur S. Brisbane, public editor of the New York Times asks if reporters in this world of balance should become "truth vigilantes"? So rather than reporting facts — i.e., politician said X about Y, even if X is false — should the media become "truth vigilantes" by pointing out that X is indeed false? That the public editor of the New York Times has to ask this is probably an indication that the media has strayed too far towards balance rather than truth. Should the media be worried about truth anymore?"
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Boeing CEO Says Outsourcing Didn't Pay

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The Seattle Times reports that Boeing's CEO is saying that the cost overruns on the 787 "Dreamliner" were greatly exacerbated by the company's heavy use of outsourcing. Although it is now fairly well accepted that outsourcing provides little cost savings and what cost savings there are often get spent in increased management costs and rework, the outsourcing drive goes on. It's nice to see a major industry figure saying that all is not so rosy as the MBAs would have us think."
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US Gov Pressuring Manning to Implicate Assange

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "In his Salon article today, Glenn Greenwald tells of the government's plan to prosecute Julian Assange. In short, the government believes that, if they can get Bradley Manning (the source of the leaked information) to testify that Assange convinced him to leak, they can prosecute Assange under the Espionage Act. As a means to this end, they have been holding Manning in isolation and subjecting him to other inhumane treatment, offering him better treatment should he would be willing to testify. That this would endanger with prosecution any investigative journalist who got information from a military informant has not passed unnoticed."
Link to Original Source
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RIAA to Appeal Thomas-Rasset Ruling

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The RIAA will appeal the ruling that reduced Jammie Thomas-Rasset's $1.92 fine for file sharing to $54,000.

"It is a shame that Ms. Thomas-Rasset continues to deny any responsibility for her actions rather than accept a reasonable settlement offer and put this case behind her," said RIAA spokeswoman Cara Duckworth.

Joe Sibley, an attorney for Thomas-Rasset, said his client would not settle for the $25,000 that the RIAA has asked for.

"Jammie is not going to agree to pay any amount of money to them," Sibley said, adding that it doesn't matter to Thomas-Rasset whether the damages are $25,000 or $1.92 million.

In addition, Thomas-Rasset's attorneys say that, win or lose, they plan to appeal the constitutionality of the fine."
Link to Original Source

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Video Title Says it All - HP Computers Are Racist

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "The folks at HP have outdone themselves this time. It turns out that when a white person tries to use the tracking software on their laptops, it works fine. When a black person tries? It doesn't work as well (or at all). It could be any number of causes to this fault, but one thing is clear — the more complicated you make something, the greater the chance of unintended consequences."
Link to Original Source
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Pope Comes Out Against Over-Zealous IP Restriction

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  about 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 (469671) writes "In his latest encyclical, Benedictine XVI comes out against overly aggressive IP restrictions. In it, he attacks "excessive zeal for protecting knowledge through an unduly rigid assertion of the right to intellectual property, especially in the field of health care." He doesn't seem to be that into a lot of today's capitalism, either — must be that whole uphold-the-downtrodden thing."
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Music From Stock Charts?

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "German composer/artist Johannes Kreidler has digitized various stock charts and other graphs, using Microsoft's SongSmith to generate the backing music. The video produced from the animation of the charts using the music as background is interesting. From his web page (my translation):

The prettiest melodies come from life itself! Every man is an artist — so too, every politician and banker: Songs for millions! Times of crisis are always good for art. Thanks for the music!

"

Link to Original Source
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Texas BoE Wants Decade of Hol(e)y Evolution

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Clay Burell, 40-year veteran teacher and Apple Distinguished Educator, blogs about a majority in the Texas Board of Education which is likely to vote for state science standards requiring science teachers to teach the (non-existent) "weaknesses or limitations of evolution." The problem? Textbooks used in Texas must align with these standards and as goes Texas (the second largest textbook market in the US, following California), so goes your kids' textbooks, wherever you are in the US. Even worse? These guidelines will be in place for a decade, warping Biology content for that period of time."
Link to Original Source
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The seven habits of highly subversive people

frank_adrian314159 frank_adrian314159 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

frank_adrian314159 writes "Tired of the repression in the US? Want to fight "da man"? Want to be a subversive? A person who grew up in an authoritarian regime tells you how to do it in seven simple habits. Although couched in language of ecological concern Amanda Kovattana gives everyone who wants to get off their butts and make a difference a good set of guidelines."
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