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Ask Slashdot: Best On-Site Backup Plan?

frostilicus2 Integrity (326 comments)

What's a good way of ensuring data integrity (and possibly repairing any corruption) that might happen? Is two copies and a checksum enough to be able to reasonably repair a (not too) corrupt file?

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best On-Site Backup Plan?

frostilicus2 Re:Split them up (326 comments)

But we're talking terabytes here: most cloud storage providers will not cater for such users (or charge exorbitant fees). Moreover, he's not interested in cloud backups. There are many, many good reasons to resist dumping your stuff onto some cloud service.

more than 2 years ago
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Linux Played a Vital Role In Discovery of Higgs Boson

frostilicus2 Re:Whew! (299 comments)

My post wasn't intended as a flamebait and, to be honest, I don't necessarily think that it needs to be interpreted as such. I just wish that the article had been less of an ad for Linux (which is really all it is) and had instead discussed some of the (genuinely interesting) computational problems that the scientists encountered. The really interesting things here are the underlying mathematics, the design and operation of the accelerator and the algorithms and hardware on which the analysis was performed. I don't really believe that the fact that everything ran on Linux is all that interesting. According to my wife (who does this kind of thing for a living, albeit in Japan and on a smaller scale) most of the libraries that she needs to run her algorithms can be found on Solaris or Linux and she (and her group) are quite happy to use either: to some extend OS just isn't all that important.

more than 2 years ago
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Linux Played a Vital Role In Discovery of Higgs Boson

frostilicus2 Fanboys... (299 comments)

No, Linux didn't play a vital role; computing, brains, mathematics and a big-ass particle accelerator did. On the computational side, BSD, Windows, Aix, Irix, Solaris could have all done exactly the same thing. I thought Mac Fanboys were bad, but Linux uncovering the fundamental nature of the universe? Wow.

more than 2 years ago
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Tux and the God Particle

frostilicus2 Fanboys (1 comments)

Yes, but Windows, Irix, AIX, BSD, Mac OS X, Solaris, etc could also have done this (with the right hardware and a bit of tweaking). Linux didn't discover Higgs: brains, mathematics, computing and a big-ass particle accelerator did.

more than 2 years ago
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Members of the European Parliament back remote safety trackers in cars

frostilicus2 Re:That's just what it is. (2 comments)

I wouldn't call it a stupid question as such. At the moment, the system functions as a beacon when a crash occurs but in normal operation there's no tracking going on: it really isn't a tracker in the conventional sense of the word. The real question is would it ever be possible to activate the beacon remotely without a crash occurring (which really would turn it into a giant tracking device). It would be desirable to have safeguards at a hardware level to prevent this. Maybe OP should have titled it "Members of the European Parliament back remote safety beacons in cars" to eliminate any confusion.

more than 2 years ago
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US Gov't Demands For Google Data Up 37% Over the Last Year

frostilicus2 Odd (77 comments)

Given the massive increases in domestic surveillance, you'd expect that demands would decrease. This is very worrying. Perhaps the government needs more surveillance powers to catch teh pedo-terrorists.

more than 2 years ago
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My thoughts on getting my own DNA tested:

frostilicus2 Been there, done that (244 comments)

Turned out to be A, C, G,T something. Oh wait, that was my report card...
Never mind...

more than 2 years ago
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Proposed UK Communications Law Could Be Used To Spy On Physical Mail

frostilicus2 Re:Does anyone actually believe that what's... (125 comments)

It's been quite private though because no one's ever taken the time to look at it. Now it can all be logged, stored, processed, lost, stolen or used for blackmail. How about a Tory MP buying a DVD from a known source of Fetish porn? Even in this case you'd expect an obscured return to sender address.

more than 2 years ago
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Proposed UK Communications Law Could Be Used To Spy On Physical Mail

frostilicus2 Re:Be very afraid... (125 comments)

Those sneaky bastards... :)

more than 2 years ago
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Proposed UK Communications Law Could Be Used To Spy On Physical Mail

frostilicus2 Re:Stop depending on classic mail and Post offices (125 comments)

Fedex and DHL will also be bound by the law and will always know sender and recipient. Stamps can still be bought with cash though. It's also illegal to withhold encryption keys from the government (senility or internet induced ADHD isn't a defense either).

more than 2 years ago
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Proposed UK Communications Law Could Be Used To Spy On Physical Mail

frostilicus2 Re:Hmm... (125 comments)

Silk Road? Bath Salts? Snail mail would also become an attractive method of communication amongst bad guys if the internet surveillance bill goes through (and it probably will).

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Instead of a Laptop, a Tiny Computer and Projector?

frostilicus2 Re:You'll regret it (339 comments)

Difficult to say. If you've got AppleCare, it should be easy (and fast) to get a replacement or recover your data. I think my point was that a Raspberry Pi will break (I've got one and it and it's associated peripherals don't exactly fill me with confidence: mine gets upset if I try to use both a mouse and an ethernet connection and likes to reboot randomly). A MacBook air, on the other hand, is a very well engineered machine: all solid state storage, aluminum unibody case and LED backlight (more reliable than CCFL) should mean that it'll run for many, many years without fault. My plastic cased MacBook is six years old has put up with all kinds of abuse but still runs like new. From what I hear, this isn't the exception to the rule.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Instead of a Laptop, a Tiny Computer and Projector?

frostilicus2 Re:You'll regret it (339 comments)

Apple tech support is genuinely excellent. Raspberry Pi tech support doesn't exist and I doubt that getting a (surprisingly) expensive projector fixed at short notice is much easier. My day-to-day machine is a beat up six year old MacBook. Bits are breaking off the case, it's been dropped, had a bottle of ink spilled on the keyboard, gotten wet and been through all kinds of abuse but it still works as well as the day I got it. A MacBook air with a unibodied aluminum case, LED backlight and all solid state storage should last a lifetime.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Instead of a Laptop, a Tiny Computer and Projector?

frostilicus2 Re:You'll regret it (339 comments)

But an Apple genius might.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Instead of a Laptop, a Tiny Computer and Projector?

frostilicus2 You'll regret it (339 comments)

It'll break, you won't be able to fix it, the ergonomics will be terrible, you'll get hassled in airport security. This is a recipe for you getting pissed. Just get a MacBook air: built to last, lightweight and usable.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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UK Government finally specifies plans for Internet Monitoring

frostilicus2 frostilicus2 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

frostilicus2 (889524) writes "The Register reports that Home Secretary Theresa May has finally specified her plans to monitor all UK internet and digital communications. The release generated so much interest that the Home Office's website went down for several hours. Sign the government e-petition in opposition, perhaps? ;)"
Link to Original Source
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frostilicus2 frostilicus2 writes  |  more than 8 years ago

frostilicus2 (889524) writes "The Register is reporting that a pair of Canadian students have waited in line for two days to purchase a PS3, before promptly smashing it with a sledgehammer outside of the store. When questioned by local media, they described the act as a "Social Experiment"."

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