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U. S. Healthcare Industry Claims Debunked

garg0yle Post hoc, ergo propter hoc? (1 comments)

Interesting that countries with "socialized medicine" (UK, Canada, etc.) have a higher life expectancy, and (as OECD statistics show) lower costs. I'd hate to draw any rash conclusions here, but it is certainly interesting, no?

more than 4 years ago
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Man Takes Up Internal Farming

garg0yle So, we could say... (136 comments)

...he's achieved inner peas?

more than 4 years ago
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Man takes up internal farming

garg0yle Lighten up on the poor guy! (1 comments)

Hey, come on now, the guy was just trying for inner peace. Unfortunately, there was a typo...

more than 4 years ago
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CYA techniques for self-employed techs?

garg0yle Why are you asking here? (1 comments)

Laws vary by jurisdiction - your ONLY option is to talk to a lawyer within your jurisdiction. Any advice you get from here is not legally binding or valid.

more than 4 years ago
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Duke Nukem Forever.... Alive?

garg0yle So, zombies? (3 comments)

Given that this game keeps somehow coming back to life, I'm assuming it will prominently feature zombies?

more than 4 years ago
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Brain Training Games Don't Train Your Brain

garg0yle How useless... (The article, that is) (151 comments)

The article says, in essence, that the study found that using Brain Academy type software for six weeks did not improve cognitive function. However, nowhere does the study prove, as the article alleges, that use of such software could not slow the rate of cognitive decay. These are two entirely different things - the second one would require a long-term study tracking both users and non-users over, say, 20 or 30 years.

more than 3 years ago
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Photos of Chinese Sweatshop Used By Microsoft

garg0yle Summary is wrong (539 comments)

The /. summary refers to "US-made products" - in a factory in China? Really? Somehow, I doubt that, especially if you actually RTFA.

more than 4 years ago
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Digital Photocopiers Loaded With Secrets

garg0yle And this is news, how? (3 comments)

Seriously. These things can store and retrieve documents. How did people THINK that happened? Magical fairies living inside the copier wrote everything in pixie dust that magically evaporated every time the thing was turned off? Yes, there's a hard drive. Yes, things get deleted (usually), but the usual caveats about being able to read "deleted" documents off a hard drive apply. This is not news.

more than 4 years ago
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History Repeats Itself, Mac & the iPad

garg0yle Re:Soul of a New Machine (2 comments)

Soul Of A New Machine is a great book - and one that most of the younger set here have probably never read. For those who might be interested, it was written by Tracy Kidder back in 1981 (and yes, they had computers back then).

more than 4 years ago
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computer error kills only 21

garg0yle The error didn't kill anybody (2 comments)

The error involved incorrectly recording whether people wanted to donate organs after death. How you leap from that to stating that the computer error killed 21 people is beyond comprehension - it's not like there were harvesting teams taking people down for their kidneys. "Oh, he's been marked as a donor, nab him, we need a liver!"

more than 4 years ago
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North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad

garg0yle The obvious response... (1 comments)

http://xkcd.com/114/

more than 4 years ago
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Time travel insurance?!?

garg0yle Unfortunately... (1 comments)

...the global economic crash of 2460 has wiped out (will wipe out) your funds.

more than 4 years ago
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Deleted facebook wall posts return to haunt

garg0yle Better advice... (3 comments)

Don't post anything on Facebook that you wouldn't want your grandmother, potential future mates, and potential future employers to read! Think before you hit that "submit" button, or risk ending up on failbooking.com!

more than 4 years ago
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Apple Selling Contract-Free iPhones in U.S.

garg0yle Re:Did I miss something? (4 comments)

A month or so ago? http://www.gsmworld.com/newsroom/press-releases/2010/4636.htm

more than 4 years ago
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Making large diamonds?

garg0yle I doubt it (1 comments)

If it went past the sun, as it melted the surface carbon would be blown off, basically shrinking it away to nothing. Even if you had a big-enough chunk of carbon that the core did get liquid and then solidify again without being shrunk to nothing, diamonds usually require pressure as well as heat.

more than 4 years ago
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Microsoft OfficeTalk to take on Twitter?

garg0yle What, no link? (2 comments)

Like the title says... Can't drive traffic to your (undoubtedly spammy) website without a link.

more than 4 years ago
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Oracle/Sun enforces pay-for-security-updates plan

garg0yle Sigh... (1 comments)

I want to mod this as "stupid", but it's not the submission that's stupid, it's what Sun is doing. Too bad there's no mod tag for that.

more than 4 years ago
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Violence-Adverse Effect Of Global Warming

garg0yle Hang on... (1 comments)

Isn't the researcher saying this, the same guy who says video games cause violence? I think *this guy* causes violence, wherever he goes. That's where the research is leading me, anyway...

more than 4 years ago
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Enterpise ERP - 3 clicks only to find information

garg0yle Department of Redundancy Department (1 comments)

Enterprise ERP? So, Enterprise Enterprise Resource Planning? Are the spammers getting dumber, or did my caffeine just kick in?

more than 4 years ago
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How do I cool a home without air conditioning?

garg0yle dehumidifier? (2 comments)

How much of the heat is actually humidity? Air conditioners work in two ways, by reducing the heat but also by reducing the humidity. If you reduce the humidity in a highly-humid environment, you won't be "cool", but at least you won't be as uncomfortable.

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

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Amazon v North Carolina?

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "Amazon is suing the Department of Revenue (DOR) for the state of North Carolina, after that government body attempted to get records of its citizens' purchases through the e-tailer.

Sales records are one thing, says Amazon. "But the DOR has no business seeking to uncover the identity of Amazon's customers who purchased expressive content, which makes up the majority of the nearly 50 million products sold to North Carolina residents during the audit period, let alone associating customers' names and addresses with the specific books, music, and video content that they have purchased during the past seven years."

While I can understand the state wanting to know how much its citizens spend with Amazon (for sales tax purposes), I can't see any legitimate reason for the state to know exactly what books and videos its citizens bought."
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IPCC "peer reviewed" report not so much

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "In November, IPCC chairman Rajendra Pachauri disparaged non-peer-reviewed research in an interview with the Times of India:

IPCC studies only peer-review science. Let someone publish the data in a decent credible publication. I am sure IPCC would then accept it, otherwise we can just throw it into the dustbin.

Sure sounds like they ONLY use peer-reviewed material, right? Except that a recent audit of the IPCC AR4 found that, of approximately 18,500 references in the report, 5,600 were "grey material" that did not undergo a peer-review process. The reason this is important is because a lot of the noise around the AGW debate has been regarding which material is "peer-reviewed". If the UN's IPCC can't be bothered to stick to its own chairman's claim of only using peer-reviewed material, then that drives a stake into anyone's complaint that Ross McKittrick's or Steve McIntyre's work hasn't been peer-reviewed."
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Years-old privacy hole to be closed in Firefox?

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "Firefox developers have announced they're close to plugging a security hole which allows websites to find out what other sites you visit — a hole which plagues virtually all browsers, and has been around for years (Microsoft categorized it as a bug in 2002). The fix won't actually completely remove the possibility, but it will make it a lot harder to exploit.

From the article: "It's also worth noting that most of the attacks can be eliminated by blocking a site's ability to run Javascript. That means users of the NoScript add-on for Firefox will in many cases be protected against the attack. ... Any site that has the ability to run code also has the ability to silently pilfer your browsing history.""

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Yet another vulnerability in IE 6, 7

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "If anyone is still using Internet Explorer versions 6 or 7, there's another new vulnerability which could allow an attacker to execute code on a computer with the same privileges as the local user.

From the bulletin, "The vulnerability exists due to an invalid pointer reference being used within Internet Explorer. It is possible under certain conditions for the invalid pointer to be accessed after an object is deleted. In a specially-crafted attack, in attempting to access a freed object, Internet Explorer can be caused to allow remote code execution.""

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Is cryptome laundering money? Paypal thinks so

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "The question as to why PayPal is suddenly holding onto Cryptome.org's donations just got weirder — apparently, PayPal is preparing to file a "Suspicious Activities Report" (SAR) as required by the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) for cases of suspected money laundering."
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A different perspective on "phone home DRM"

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "Over here, we take our "always-on" Internet connections for granted. But what about if you're somewhere where the Internet is flaky, or you have to pay high prices for an external provider? I'm speaking of soldiers on overseas tours of duty. The article provides an interesting perspective to the recent debate about "phone-home DRM"."
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Action movies are mathematically better?

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "Over at The Register there's an article claiming that action movies are better than other genres because the directors and editors of those movies have learned how to take advantage of the "1/f fluctuation" to keep our attention better. So, the next time you're riveted to the screen by a movie, thank a mathematician!"
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Intel also hit in "Google hack attack"

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "Intel is now admitting that it was also hit in the January attacks that hit Google, Adobe, and other companies. Security firm iDefense has said 34 companies were hit during the attacks, but most of them have not publicly come forward to date."
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Zero-day Firefox exploit in the wild

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "It's being reported that a zero-day exploit for Firefox is "in the wild", after it was released by a Russian security researcher as a module for Vulndisco, an add-on to the Immunity Canvas automated exploitation system sold to security professionals. The exploit is currently only available to licensees of that product, but it's likely only a matter of time before it's more widely available.

Mozilla, meanwhile, is saying "Mozilla takes all security vulnerabilities seriously, and have as yet been unable to confirm the claim of an exploit. We value the contributions of all security researchers and encourage them to work within our security process, responsibly disclosing vulnerabilities to ensure the highest level of security and best outcome for users."

Generally, in the security community, it's considered bad practice to release a vulnerability like this without disclosing it to the manufacturer first and giving them time to confirm and fix the issue. It's unknown if that was done in this case, but it doesn't seem likely on the basis of the above quote."

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Interstellar hydrogen prevents light-speed travel?

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "As if relativity wasn't enough to prevent us travelling at light speed, Professor William Edelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is now claiming that the interstellar hydrogen, compressed in front of the ship, would bring the journey to a shocking end. From the article, 'As the spaceship reached 99.999998 per cent of the speed of light, "hydrogen atoms would seem to reach a staggering 7 teraelectron volts", which for the crew "would be like standing in front of the Large Hadron Collider beam".'"
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Video of anti-missile laser test released

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "Last Thursday, it was announced that the US had successfully tested an airplane-based laser against a ballistic missile. Now, video has been released of the test. Interestingly, after the debate on the Slashdot submission last week, it appears from the video and the write-up that this was a real "kill", not a simulated one."
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Flying aircraft carrier's crash site now historic

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "The USS Macon is not well-known in the history books, but that might change, now that her final resting place has been designated a historic site. Sounding more like something out of a last-century "speculative fiction" novel, the Macon was a flying aircraft carrier."
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Microsoft wins WGA court case

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "After more than three years (and untold millions in legal fees), a court has dismissed the lawsuit against Microsoft over "Windows Genuine Advantage" with prejudice. The lawsuit alleged that WGA was distributed under the guise of a "critical security update" and thus was no better than spyware. Last month, an attempt to certify the lawsuit as a class-action suit was also discarded by the courts."
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First Chevy Volt off the line Nov 1

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "GM is poised to begin production of the Chevrolet Volt in November of this year. Dealers have until September to submit pre-orders, and will find out in November how many they'll actually receive. Looks like the cars will be built in Detroit at the Hamtramck plant."
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Jedi group seeking new leader

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "A group of Jedis in England are seeking a new leader after their previous one was forced to step down due to health concerns. Prospective candidates should have a martial arts background and be steeped in the teachings of the Force. I'm assuming you just send your resume to Coruscant to apply?"
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Pharmacies not to sell unlicensed "natural" meds

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "Pharmacies in Canada have been ordered not to sell unlicensed "natural health remedies" by regulators. From the article: 'The National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities (NAPRA) says pharmacists cannot be assured the products are safe until they are granted a government licence, and should not sell them in those circumstances. "Pharmacists are obliged to hold the health and safety of the public or patient as their first and foremost consideration," said the association's recently issued position statement.'"
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Fruit bats can drink humans under the table?

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

garg0yle (208225) writes "It's known that animals in nature (including fruit bats) will seek out fermented fruit in much the same way humans seek out anything containing alcohol. But do they get drunk in the way that humans do? Researchers in Canada decided to find out, and the results were surprising. Even with enough alcohol in their bloodstream to make most humans wobbly-kneed, the bats were able to fly through an obstacle course without difficulty. From the article, "the authors think that it is more likely that they are simply hard drinkers.""
Link to Original Source

Journals

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Never forget...

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

...technology is a young man's (or woman's!) game. Eventually, the effort to re-invent yourself to keep up with the next big thing will overwhelm you. At that time, it's best to move on to management, change fields entirely, or (if you got lucky with stock options) retire.

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Just for convenience...

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

...can we assume that anything submitted to Slashdot between (say) 12:01am and 6:00am Eastern time is spam, unless proven otherwise? It would simplify things greatly.

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Got Jule!

garg0yle garg0yle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Okay, I'm a day late on that, but Happy Yule anyway. Or happy Saturnalia. Or, if you're into subverting the holidays and symbolism of others for your own needs, then Merry Christmas. Or, if you're into completely made-up holidays (as if there are any other kind), Happy Kwanzaa. Etc., etc., etc.

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