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Comments

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Passwords: Too Much and Not Enough

gbjbaanb Re:Why so high? (208 comments)

I know plenty. The whole point is that a hashed password is simply one that takes a little time to decrypt. For example, it was reported a year or so ago that someone had built a machine from commodity hardware that could crack a NTLM password in about 5 minutes. Now a better encryption algorithm is good, but it just kicks the can further down the road. Its not a solution, just more of a sticking plaster solution.

The best security is not to allow the attacker to get the passwords at all. How many sites have you heard of that have announced security breaches that inform all their users to immediately change all their passwords? 1? 2? Oh yeah, loads. Do you think these very large sites had security experts too?

The point of saying "keep passwords in plaintext" is not a truly valid suggestion - everyone should encrypt them, but they should not imagine for a second that it will keep the passwords secure from attackers, that job is down to architectural decisions, the idea that you store them plaintext is to make people really think about their architecture. If your passwords are plain text, you think "how else can we secure these". Leave them encrypted you think "job done, that's secure!", and then sometime later you find your password DB downloaded and is being decrypted by some arsehole off 4chan and you have to tell the media that all your users should change their passwords.

Once I worked at a financial services company and the security guy gave us a little presentation. He opened up IE (for we worked with Windows at that place, like many financial services companies) and entered the URL for the web server, then types in a string of characters into the browser address bar. And we saw it open a command prompt that had full administrative access to the webserver box. That was an exploit that Microsoft fixed... but I always wonder when another one just like that will be discovered.. for all you know, it already has been and is being used right now.

That's why you do not rely on bcrypt as the only answer to the security of your passwords (I hope you use bcrypt, last time I saw PHP it still used MD5..... crackable in minutes)

Of course, you didn't mention salting, so I hope they told you about that too. Unsalted password hashes... about as useless as chocolate teapots.

So I hope I don't use sites you coded. Its not as if 3-tier architectures are a bad thing anyway, but if your webserver has direct access to the DB, its only a matter of time before someone has all your passwords and will happily cracking them open.

9 hours ago
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Passwords: Too Much and Not Enough

gbjbaanb Re:Why so high? (208 comments)

lol, no. It meant that there was more of a layer between the web server and the DB server than just a php page with the DB credentials in it chmodded to 700.

Assume an attacker has taken over your web server with an exploit and now has full admin access to it. If there is no direct connectivity to the DB, all he can do to get at your DB is call the methods on the middle-tier services that the web server called. These are not "download all passwords" but small and tightly targetted services that only provide a smallpiece of the puzzle that ends up providing the end-user experience.

So, in practice there is nothing the attacker can do to really break your DB. He can attempt to hack the application server, and that is a fair point, but he still has to break it and if you're really doing security the app tier is running a different OS that the web tier, and is firewalled down so only specific ports can be accessed anyway and there are no similar services running on it (such as apache or IIS) that are the usual attack vectors. You also have more leeway in rejecting requests from the webserver that you do not have on the web side of things - whereas a webserver has to respond to anything the user sends to it, you can trust your webserver to only send you specific requests - and if your webserver sends you a mangled request you can rightly assume its been compromised and start to refuse all requests from it (this works best if you have multiple web servers). you raise a big alarm to the admin who can then investigate. Webserver hacks can often go un-noticed if the attacker is careful.

Assume the attacker is really skilled and has hacked your web server *and* your application server... he *still* cannot download all the passwords as they are store in tables that the app tier cannot read, all it can do is fire stored procedure requests at the DB which will only respond with what they were designed for. (none of which allow 'download all passwords')

So you see that while its not impossible to be secure in such an architecture, its damn right difficult for an attacker to really get at your precious data, So difficult they'll either be unable to do it (eg most kiddies with their downloaded apache or IIS hack cookbooks) or will find it so difficult they'll get caught, or they'll just move on to another target.

We used to have a linux web tiier, and a windows middle tier. We encrypted the DB credentials in a web.config and ran the services, each on a different user. The DB sprocs also were allowed access to only those services that required it. I would never encrypt the web tier access to the DB, because I would never allow it. An attacker could take that credential file offline and hack it at his leisure. Its best if he is not given the chance to read it at all. But worse, if he can logon as that user then he can access the DB without even knowing the password. Storing it on the easily-hacked box is the flaw here. Make it hard for them, and assume your webserver is already hacked when you code your site.

As for employees, there's not a lot you can do about that other than monitor their activity on the production server and restrict access. ensure they work in pairs perhaps and maybe (and this is radical for a lot of companies), treat them well so they don't become disgruntled!

yesterday
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Verizon Injects Unique IDs Into HTTP Traffic

gbjbaanb Re:Is there a way to prevent this? (198 comments)

bullshit. They bought it from the government, whose representation of its citizens occurs roughly every 5 years for a fortnight. Apart from that time, they do what they like. And even in that fortnight they just tell you what you wanted to hear anyway.

yesterday
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Verizon Injects Unique IDs Into HTTP Traffic

gbjbaanb Re:Is there a way to prevent this? (198 comments)

sure, but covertly serving gays have been there since.. well, shortly after the Greek empire ended.

yesterday
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Passwords: Too Much and Not Enough

gbjbaanb Re:Why are we still using passwords? (208 comments)

Because its wrong.

If you treat each word as a symbol, rather than each letter, then you find the average vocabulary is about 10000 symbols and you have just generated a 4-character password (admittedly in base-10000 rather than base-26) but you'll find its still easily crackable, especially if the hacker uses pre-generated rainbow tables.

Or to put it another way, your xkcd password, if the user has a vocabulary of 10k words, being cracked by a CPU that can manage a trillion hashes per second (easy) means your password can be brute forced in less than 3 hours. For reference, 16 random characters would take 2.5 billion years (ie 64^16 = 8*10^28, which is 8*10^16 trillion seconds, or 2512 million years). Ok probability says your chances are on average half that.. only 1.25 million years.

The best password is a random one, use a tool to generate and store them and let it type them into the password field. If you must use a xkcd style password, at least stick a digit between each word.

yesterday
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Passwords: Too Much and Not Enough

gbjbaanb Re:Why so high? (208 comments)

Its not about entering passwords on the web login page, but securing the back-end system so that the password database cannot be stolen.

I am constantly amazed at the reports that hackers have accessed the passwords of every user on some site or other. I used to work at a financial company where the web server didn't have physical connectivity to the DB, every request had to go through a service that was not only secured itself, but also could only run stored procedures which were in turn secured. The net result was that is (or rather when) the web site got hacked, all the hacker could do *at best* was access some public data for a single user, which never included the stored password. (incidentally, the developers didn't have access to production servers either)

So sites like ebay et al have direct DB connectivity to their DBs, so if any hacker exploits some zero day that gives them access to the OS, they can simple "select * from user" and download every password, hashed or not, and crack them at their leisure.

Personally, I think passwords should be stored in plain text in the DB as a reminder to all developers that they need to be protected in other ways so the hacker cannot access them in any circumstance.

However, what I do find strange is that web devs do not know this, I wrote the above for an ArsTechnica comment and the "security editor" promoted a criticism of it where the concept of a 3-tier architecture was "too expensive" an d"inefficient", suggesting that storing your DB credentials in your web code was OK as long as you "secured" it. If this is the level of comprehension of security in the web dev community, then I'm not only unsurprised at the number of hacks, but will be using a randomly-generated password for every website that asks me for a password.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: Aging and Orphan Open Source Projects?

gbjbaanb Re:Options... (154 comments)

and CodePlex, which although hosted my Microsoft does a better UI job of the overall thing than Google Code (which has dropped support for binary releases, telling you to use dropbox or something instead), and has a pretty poor tracker.

I found github to be a bit 'meh' too in terms of usability, though still better than google code.

I'm not sure what the best one to use is, based on functionality and usability rather than something that has 'git' in the name or some vague "startup coolness". If anyone can enlighten us, I'd appreciate it.

3 days ago
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More Eye Candy Coming To Windows 10

gbjbaanb Re:how pretty (209 comments)

I thought they'd turned off all extraneous 'eye candy' to get a slim, lean, 'clean', look that was very efficient... and so I fully expect them to start making some tiles translucent in the next release, and then with shiny graphical highlights too.

Maybe one day they'll make buttons that look like buttons so you know where to click!

4 days ago
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Help ESR Stamp Out CVS and SVN In Our Lifetime

gbjbaanb Re:I am not going to convert (243 comments)

You have the same log history in git as you do in Svn - a linear chain of commits. What you describe as a tree is due to the branching and merging. SVN has the same thing, you branch just as much as you do with git, the difference is how the 2 store this information internally.

eg where I work, we use feature branches for independant development. Then the final fixes get merged to the product release branches and trunk. Not too dissimilar from how you tend to use git.

I worked at a place that used git (alas, not me, I was in the Windows team and had to use TFS :( ) and too many people used ot have to call the git guru over because they would munge up their repos. I don't know how they did it, but the fact that they did it too often for my tastes suggests git is a tool that is only for advanced, or experienced users only. Unfortunately that means nowhere near enterprise development.

Today, I'd never suggest git, I'd go with Fossil if I needed a DVCS.

4 days ago
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Help ESR Stamp Out CVS and SVN In Our Lifetime

gbjbaanb Re:I am not going to convert (243 comments)

the trouble with DVCSs is there is no repository to backup. Everyone has their copies and a vape in one can (and will) be propagated to the others. Restore your repo from backups and watch as someone then commits the vape when they push their changes to you - the system doesn't know that it shouldn't take that commit.

Its not like a centralized system where you can have proper backups.

4 days ago
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Help ESR Stamp Out CVS and SVN In Our Lifetime

gbjbaanb Re:I am not going to convert (243 comments)

you can have a pop at SVN for many things (hell, you can have a pop at anything for the same reasons) but seriously, you're trying to use those arguments?

SVN's security is like all the others, except for servers like VIsualSVN that implement active directory auth. Its not unstable at all, more people complain about it not being more bleeding edge, but of course its job is to be stable. They updated to serf, 3 years ago? and there were issues in the betas. Whoop, what did you expect.

And the 'philosophy' that you cannot ever obliterate history is a good one, one that all other SCMs should follow. If you commit something you shouldn't, it should be a serious thing to remove that history - otherwise everyone will screw your SCM up, and your SCM is the one thing you do not ever want screwed up.

4 days ago
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Help ESR Stamp Out CVS and SVN In Our Lifetime

gbjbaanb Re:I am not going to convert (243 comments)

Exactly. I don't know why there's such nerdage against SVN except that git is hard, so therefore its better somehow. Despite the fact you can lose your history (irrevocably if you try) and screw things up even if you don't.

If something is working, there's no point in trying to break it. And if you were to go break it, you'd go with Fossil anyway, git done right.

5 days ago
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An Algorithm to End the Lines for Ice at Burning Man

gbjbaanb Re:Obvious solutions (341 comments)

of course an even more obvious solution is to open your own ice franchise at Burning Man, there's obviously the demand if queue's are an hour long, and £3 for a bag of water.... and he can implement his idea, make a fortune *and* post smugly about how great he is for thinking it up!

5 days ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

gbjbaanb Re:Some Sense Restored? (520 comments)

but if Debian drops systemd, what will "automagic" Ubuntu do, seeing as its very much based on Debian?

What it will do is divide the Linux distros into systemd and dependencies, and those without (or with something better). If projects like Gnome become more tied into systemd, will this mean they won't work on non-systemd distros?

about a week ago
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Bill Gates: Piketty's Attack on Income Inequality Is Right

gbjbaanb Re:The Middle Class is the Bedrock of Society (838 comments)

Production is essential to the mix here, we tried the concept of simply driving an economy by selling each other non-produced things (typically services, like mortgages and loans) and you saw what happened there around 2007/2008.

An economy cannot be spun out of thin air, we need to sell stuff to each other - sure, but we need to sell stuff we need to buy and make sure its regulated so we don't go into another spiral of 'profits' generated out of our imaginations. After all, my house is worth a million dollars, so I'm incredibly rich.

There is an issue with investment - as you noted. As the rate of return drops due to too much investment money chasing yields, investors demand more interest-bearing investments, which is why housing (as 1 example) has gotten out of control. Instead of investing in productivity, they are simply inflating a bubble (again). This can't be healthy for an economy.

about two weeks ago
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If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

gbjbaanb Re:incremental backups (150 comments)

The colo server - if the provider goes bust, you might turn up att heir doors only to find it locked down and facing a lengthy battle with the administrators to prove its your kit. Even then, when you get it back both hardware and data will be obsolete.

about two weeks ago
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If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

gbjbaanb incremental backups (150 comments)

This is the same problem we've always had, whether its someone's website on a shared host or a colo server. You need to back it all up and doing a naive dump of the entire thing will take too long and cost too much in bandwidth, so you take a dump of the entire thing once (preferably when you have the thing you're deploying locally) and then take incremental backups from there.

The big question is what's the best backup tools to do this, and do they work on cloud systems that don't look like real servers? eg. I recall rsoft that did very good incrementals based on disk blocks changing so the backups were also continuous. Not sure if that'd fly on AWS.

about two weeks ago
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Windows Users, Get Ready For a Bigger-Than-Usual Patch Tuesday

gbjbaanb Re: IE 6? (63 comments)

the difference is: when Linux has a critical bug, its front-page news; when Windows has a critical bug, its just another Tuesday.

about two weeks ago
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The Greatest Keyboard Ever Made

gbjbaanb Re:Still being made... (304 comments)

Its not about the flexibility, its about the solidity. I want the keyboard to stay still, even if I knock it sideways or with the palm of my hand accidentally. A heavy keyboard sits there and takes it, a cheapo one bounces around slightly, its annoying.

I do have a build machine at work that sits on some drawers between desks, the keyboard is just too wide to sit nicely on the drawers so one end is always raised. A good keyboard would improve that situation, but its so little used directly that we live with it.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Dear Apple, pay tax or we'll sue you

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  about a month ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "The EU is to decry Apple's tax arrangements with Ireland, Luxembourg and Holland tomorrow, stating that their tax deals amount to "illegal state aid". Penalties if found guilty are massive fines (probably still less than if Apple had paid the 'expected' amount of tax). It suggests an interesting way of making companies pay tax, and I imagine Google, Microsoft et al will be next if this case succeeds."
Link to Original Source
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Why Banana skins are slippery wins IgNobel

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  about a month ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "This year's Ig Nobel prize was won by Japanese researchers investigating why banana skins produced a frictionless surface compared to apple and orange peels.
(apparently "The polysaccharide follicular gels that give banana skins their slippery properties are also found in the membranes where our bones meet." so its not all fun and jollity)

Other prizes were awarded for noting that dogs only defecate when aligned with north-south magnetic fields, and that 'night owl' people are more likely to be psychopaths than early risers. Yes, that probably includes you."

Link to Original Source
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So black you can't see it.

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  about 3 months ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "A British company is developing a new material that’s so black it absorbs all but 0.035 percent of the visual light, making it the darkest material ever created.

Of course, apart from making album covers, it conducts heat 7 times better than copper and is 10 times stronger than steel.

the pictures are the best, it looks like its sitting on some foil, but its grown on the foil which is all crinkled and bent — only people who have seen it say that it looks smooth because so little light is being reflected."

Link to Original Source
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AMD's new gfx API Mantle offers 40% framerate improvement over OpenGL and Dx

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  about 9 months ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "AMD has a new low-level graphics API to take on OpenGL and DirectX. It works by reducing the amount of overhead involved in most graphics operations and getting closer to the metal which results in some substantial frame rate improvements, especially on CPU bound systems.

AMD have been talking about the possibility to hand over control to Khronos Group in the future and that they have a SDK scheduled later this year which will make it possible for Intel and Nvidia to start working on support for Mantel if they want to."

Link to Original Source
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Fight ash dieback disease.. on facebook

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  about a year ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "Remember folding@home and similar massively distributed programs that tried to get enough computing power to help fightr diseases, the latest one is a little different. In the UK, Ash Dieback disease is has been imported from the continent and is killing all the native ash trees, so researchers have created a crowd-sourced game to match genetic sequences of resistant trees.

Computer systems to match thousands of sequences are difficult to do, but humans are very good at pattern matching, which is why the game was created.

And released on Facebook to reach a wide community, who can play an entertaining puzzle game without having to pay for a single f*** sheep (or leaf). About time."

Link to Original Source
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Interplanetary Internet tested on the ISS

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  about 2 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "At last — we have a new Internet protocol (eat your heart out IPv6) — called DTN (for disruption tolerant networking).

This "interplanetary internet" has been used by an astronaut at the International Space Station (ISS) to send commands to a robot on Earth and will be used primarily for communication with distant nodes."

Link to Original Source
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Windows 7 finally overtakes XP

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "Microsoft Windows 7 has finally overtaken the 11-year-old Windows XP operating system on web-based market share figures from Netmarketshare

So what does this mean for Windows 8? Another 5 years before it has as many installations as Windows 7, does that mean that writing Metrp-only apps on a OS that doesn't have critical mass will be as successful as Silverlight?"

Link to Original Source
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Nokia sells Qt to Digia

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "Finnish software company Digia announced today that it is acquiring the Qt software business from Nokia. Digia plans to pick up where Nokia left off, continuing Qt development but renewing the toolkit’s focus on cross-platform support."
Link to Original Source
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Apple assisting the trade in stolen iPhones

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "Need a new iDevice? Simple — first steal one, then 'accidentally' break it and take it to your nearest Apple store and present it for warranty repair, and an Apple 'genius' will hand you a brand new one, no questions asked.

So Apple could help make stolen iPhones useless to the thief by locking them, or they could be encouraging thieves who know they'll get a brand new one to sell on. More worryingly, this will invalidate your insurance:

Charlie Durrant was a victim of iPhone theft. After her handset was stolen last year she reported the theft to Apple and her insurer. However, when she requested a replacement phone, her insurer told her that one had already been issued in her name. The thief had taken advantage of Apple's lack of checks. ... "someone had just gone in and got a brand new one, making my insurance invalid.""

Link to Original Source
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European eID announced

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "On Wednesday, the European Commission published a strategy document aimed at setting up systems to protect children online. In the document — but not in the accompanying press release nor the citizens' summary — the Commission mentioned that it will soon propose a "pan-European framework for electronic authentication", full details will be announced on 30th May.

The launch of the strategy follows a push to strengthen internet security in the EU. It also outlined legal measures to make it easier for people to use a single e-ID for online services across borders, which would underpin a move toward a pan-European framework for electronic identification, authentication and signature (Pefias) framework."

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Amazon accused of bullying small firms, and inflat

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "Online shopping giant Amazon has been accused of artificially inflating prices by banning firms that trade on its website from selling goods more cheaply elsewhere on the internet.

Amazon has ordered them to ‘maintain parity between the terms on which you offer or sell each item through Amazon’ and the amount they charge for the same product on other sites."

Link to Original Source
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Nokia sells 12 phones per second

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "no, don't worry Windows Phone hasn't taken over the world... this is the S40 "burning platform" success story.

What surprised me: To make S40 phones attractive to them, the software — and the hardware it runs on — now supports a wide range of apps, from the wildly popular Angry Birds game to instant messaging and apps to connect with social networks. Ms McDowell says that "a lot of work is being done to get such marquee apps" on to the S40 platform, to boost its attractiveness.

So why run a smartphone when a 'dumb' phone can do everything you want, including 3.7 million app downloads per day.

Last year, this low-margin business contributed about half of Nokia's profits."

Link to Original Source
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Spanish bank BBVA to use Google's cloud

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "Spanish banking giant BBVA is switching its 110,000 staff to use Google's range of enterprise software.

The bank told the BBC it would use Google's tools only for internal communication, but the deal can be seen as a breakthrough in corporate adoption.

The customer and bank data will still be held on internal systems, but all communication will be via Google services, mainly driven by a need to serve the bank's increasingly mobile workers."

Link to Original Source
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Winner of Microsoft Excel World Championship

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 3 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "The world of competitive computing has another winner to add the the honour-rolls. This time its UK student Rebecca Rickwood who has beatuen 78 other finalists to be crowned best user of Microsoft's spreadsheet software, Excel 2007.

Sincere congratulations to Miss Rickwood, but please — find out about boys soon."

Link to Original Source
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the Longhorn dream reborn

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 3 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "Early this month, Microsoft dropped something of a bombshell on Windows developers: the new Windows 8 touch-friendly immersive style would use a developer platform not based on .NET. Cue howls of outrage from .NET developers everywhere, but here Ars Technica descibes what's more likely to have been going on and why Microsoft is finally getting its act together for developers."
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New runtime for native Android apps on Windows

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "A startup called BlueStacks has developed an Android runtime environment for the Windows operating system.

BlueStacks has overcome the performance barrier by building a native x86 Android runtime that doesn't have to rely on emulation. The company says that Android applications running on its stack will be highly responsive on Windows and won't suffer from the kind of lag that developers are accustomed to experiencing when using Google's emulator.

No product is availablefor download to the great unwashed, but partner Citrix showed a demo of the system at Citrix Synergy conference. An alpha of the runtime will be available for download in July."

Link to Original Source
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Skylon spaceplane passes key review

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 3 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "A revolutionary UK spaceplane concept has been boosted by the conclusions of an important technical review.

Skylon is a design for a workign spaceplane that uses revolutionalry engines that work as normal jets near the ground and switch to rocket propulsion in the upper atmosphere. The concept means the plane will not have to carry as much fuel and so will not need disposable stages.

Its estimated the cost of delivering payloads to orbit will drop from $15000 per kilo to $1000 making this the best prospect for commercialisation of orbit."

Link to Original Source
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Web standard gets EU funding

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 4 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "The BBC is reporting news of project Webinos, an initiative to provide a common platform for web applications that would sidestep current operating systems and allow devs to create web-based apps that would run anywhere — PCs, TVs, cars, mobiles.

The project aims to sidestep operating systems and proprietary app stores by providing a web-based approach.

The idea would enable a given app to work, for example, on a web-ready television, in a car and on a mobile, no matter the makers of the devices... Companies can afford to have an app on two or at most three platforms — they're extremely costly to develop and ensure the user experience..


Makes sense for all, except companies that thrive on having their own, proprietary systems to 'differentiate' themselves from the other proprietary systems."

Link to Original Source
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ISP's top data hog gobbles 2.7TB of data in a mont

gbjbaanb gbjbaanb writes  |  more than 4 years ago

gbjbaanb (229885) writes "In a rare turn of events, a Belgian ISP has released figure for its "super users" by bandwidth usage not to demonise them, but to show how good their network and plans are! 1 User downloaded more than 2TB, 7 others hit the 1TB mark.

Its only a matter of time before there's a competition for who can clog this network up with the most traffic :)"

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